Desarrollo de las colonias



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Grade 5

Social Studies

Unit: 02

Lesson: 01



Suggested Duration: 4 Days
Desarrollo de las colonias

Lesson Synopsis:

In the previous unit, students learned about European exploration and colonization in the Western Hemisphere. Students were introduced to the English colonial regions (New England, Middle and Southern colonies) and reasons for coming to the New World. This lesson investigates where and why the English colonists settled in America. The lesson also looks at leaders who had an impact on the development of the colonies and their reasons for founding the colonies.
TEKS:

5.1

History. The student understands the causes and effects of European colonization in the United States beginning in 1565, the founding of St. Augustine.


5.1A

Explain when, where, and why groups of people explored, colonized, and settled in the United States, including the search for religious freedom and economic gain.

5.1B

Describe the accomplishments of significant individuals during the colonial period including William Bradford, Ann Hutchinson, William Penn, John Smith, John Wise, and Roger Williams.


5.9

Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:


5.9A

Describe how and why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present.

5.9B

Analyze the positive and negative consequences of human modification of the environment in the United States, past and present.


5.11

Economics. The student understands the development, characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in the United States. The student is expected to:

5.11A

Describe the development of the free enterprise system in colonial America and the United States.


5.14

Government. The student understands the organization of governments in colonial America. The student is expected to:


5.14A

Identify the systems of government of early European colonists; including representative government and monarchy.

5.14B

Identify examples of representative government in the American colonies, including the Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses.


5.22

Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the United States. The student is expected to:


5.22A

Identify the similarities and differences within and among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States.

5.22C

Summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity.


Social Studies Skills TEKS:

5.24

Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:


5.24B

Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions


5.25

Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:


5.25D

Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies;




Getting Ready for Instruction

Performance Indicator(s):

  • Create a 3-column chart summarizing the political (government), economic (industries), social (religion), and geographic (natural resources, climate, landforms) attributes of a chosen colony from each region (New England, middle, southern). Explain with an illustration the colonies’ uniqueness. (5.1A, 5.1B; 5.11A; 5.14A, 5.14B; 5.22A, 5.22C; 5.24B; 5.25D)

1C, 1E, 5F

Key Understandings and Guiding Questions:

  • La interacción entre las personas y la geografía llevaron a diferencias políticas, económicas y sociales en las colonias.

      • ¿Qué factores de atracción y repulsión motivaron a las personas a emigrar y a establecerse en la América Colonial?

      • ¿Qué papel jugó la geografía física de la región colonial en el establecimiento de las colonias?

      • ¿Cuáles eran las principales diferencias políticas, económicas y sociales entre las colonias?




Vocabulary of Instruction:

  • características políticas

  • características económicas

  • características sociales

  • características geográficas

  • libertad religiosa

  • persecución

  • colonia




Materials:

  • Refer to the Notes for Teacher section for materials.


Attachments:

  • Handout: Biographies

  • Handout: Colonial Leaders

  • Teacher Resource: Handout: Colonial Leaders KEY

  • Handout: 3-Tab Graphic Organizer

  • Handout: Comparing Colonies

  • Teacher Resource: Handout: Comparing Colonies KEY




Resources and References:

    • William Penn: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/colonial/jb_colonial_penn_1.html




Advance Preparation:

  1. Become familiar with content and procedures for the lesson, including why various people came to America during the colonial period.

  2. Refer to the Instructional Focus Document for specific content to include in the lesson.

  3. Select appropriate sections of the textbook and other classroom materials that support the learning for this lesson.

  4. Preview available resources and websites according to district guidelines.

  5. Prepare materials and handouts as needed.




Background Information:

People migrated to the colonial region of what is today the United States for political, economic, and religious reasons. Persecution continued in England and as the Anglican Church grew stronger, religious toleration became a major issue for those that did not agree with the Church of England’s doctrine. Religious freedom and economic gain were two vital factors that pulled colonists to the different regions of colonial America.


Getting Ready for Instruction Supplemental Planning Document

Instructors are encouraged to supplement and substitute resources, materials, and activities to differentiate instruction to address the needs of learners. The Exemplar Lessons are one approach to teaching and reaching the Performance Indicators and Specificity in the Instructional Focus Document for this unit. Instructors are encouraged to create original lessons using the Content Creator in the Tools Tab located at the top of the page. All originally authored lessons can be saved in the “My CSCOPE” Tab within the “My Content” area.

Instructional Procedures




Instructional Procedures

Notes for Teacher

ENGAGE – America as a Refuge

NOTE: 1 Day = 50 minutes

Suggested Day 1 – 10 minutes

  1. Sketch a graphic organizer (see the modified Frayer Model organizer in Notes for Teacher) for students to copy. Put the word “refuge” in the middle. Provide students with a definition of the word. (One optional definition is: Refuge: a place where you can find relief, help, safety, and comfort in times of trouble)




  1. Facilitate a class discussion about “refuge” based on the description provided. Students provide examples seeking refuge from personal experiences, current events, bullying, etc. (Examples might include seeking shelter in a storm, going to parents when troubled, going to a teacher for advice, going to the school counselor, etc…)




  1. After a few minutes of discussion on the word refuge, relate the word to the experience of the colonists. Many colonists were seeking refuge when they came to America.

  • Why do people seek refuge when leaving a country (their homeland)? (war, hunger, no future, etc.)

  • Why might colonists from England be seeking refuge?

  • What were they escaping? What were their fears?




  1. Students, individually or in pairs, read information about William Penn. Include the article from the Library of Congress: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/colonial/jb_colonial_penn_1.html




  1. With a partner, students discuss and add information to the vocabulary activity graphic organizer.

  • In the next few days we will read and explore differences between the colonies including their leaders, government, economies, social attributes (religion) and geography.




Purpose:

To get students to think about oppression and the choices some early colonists made that resulted in their coming to America seeking refuge.


TEKS: 5.1A, 5.1B; 5.25D
Vocabulary Activity organizer


Instructional Note:

  • The vocabulary graphic organizer may be sketched on the board for students to draw.

  • The article from the Library of Congress may be projected or printed for each student to read.




EXPLORE – Colonial Leaders

Suggested Day 1 (cont’d) – 40 minutes

  1. Form groups of six students (some groups may have more than six). These groups are the Home Groups. Students gather in their home groups to meet and greet the other members, introducing themselves to each other so they will remember who is in their Home Group.




  1. Students number off (1-6) within their home group.




  1. The number 1s meet in a specified area of the room. Repeat the procedure with number 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s and 6s.These groups are the Expert Groups.




  1. Distribute to each Expert Group member a map of colonial America and the page from the Handout: Biographies for the colonial leader they will learn about. Students also access additional information about their leader, from the textbook, other classroom materials, and the internet.




  1. Each Expert Group investigates their colonial leader to become experts on the leader, taking notes on the information they gathered, especially information that helps them describe the accomplishments of the significant individual during the colonial period. They discuss information gained and work together to create a complete portrait of the leader, including identifying on the map where the leader lived.




  1. Teacher circulates, probing with questions, correcting and clarifying information and providing additional information as needed.




  1. Distribute the Handout: Colonial Leaders.




  1. Students return to their Home Groups. In turn, each home group member shares what was learned about the leader studied, beginning with location on the map.




  1. As each member reports, the other group members take notes on the Handout: Colonial Leaders.




  1. Teacher circulates, probing with questions, correcting and clarifying information and providing additional information as needed.




Materials:

  • Map of colonial America

  • Information on colonial leaders


Attachments:

  • Handout: Biographies (6 copies)

  • Handout: Colonial Leaders (1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Colonial Leaders KEY


Purpose:

Students become experts on one Colonial Leader to share with their Home Groups.


TEKS: 5.1A, 5.1B, 5.24B, 5.25D
Instructional Note:

A map of Colonial America is needed for this activity. It is recommended that the map shows the three regions and names for each of the colonies.




EXPLAIN – Colonial Leaders

Suggested Day 2 – 15 minutes

  1. Students choose a colonial leader they learned about on Day 1 and write three sentences that tell how the leader influenced the colony and whether his/her impact or influence was economic, political (government), or social (religion).




  1. Students support their responses.




  1. Facilitate a brief class discussion to provide students an opportunity to share information they found interesting and to make connections.




TEKS: 5.1A, 5.1B, 5.22A, 5.24B, 5.25D


EXPLORE – Comparing Colonies

Suggested Day 2 and 3 – 50 minutes

  1. Students create a 3-Tab Organizer for the three colonial regions.




  1. Distribute the Handout: 3-Tab Graphic Organizer Instructions and a piece of paper. Students create their organizer by following the instructions on the handout.




  1. On the front of the organizer, students draw a map of the thirteen colonies (number 7 on the instructions page) in such a way that the regions align with the tabs.




  1. In small groups (4 or fewer), students work together and use classroom resources, the textbook, and the internet to gather information about the colonies, focusing on political (government), economic (industries), religious, and other social factors. They also note geographic factors (natural resources, climate, landforms) of the colonies on the map (use call-out boxes as needed). (When considering geographic factors, include adaptations and/or modifications made to their environment.)




  1. To deepen their understanding of life in the colonies and the colonies’ differences and unique characteristics, students read appropriate sections of the textbook or other classroom resources. (This can be completed as homework.)




Materials:

  • Information on colonial life in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies

  • Paper for graphic organizer



Purpose:

Students read, compare, and contrast various aspects about the colonies.


TEKS: 5.9A, 5.9B, 5.11A, 5.14A, 5.14B, 5.22A


EXPLAIN – Comparing Colonies

Suggested Day 3 (cont’d) – 15 minutes

  1. Facilitate a discussion where students share information on their 3-tab organizer as they discuss the colonies, the leaders, and the colonial regions (including geographic characteristics), answer the guiding questions and support the Key understanding. Students adjust the information on their 3-tab organizer.

  • The interaction between people and the geography led to political, economic, and social differences of the colonies.

      • What push and pull factors motivated people to migrate and settle in colonial America?

      • What role did the physical geography of the colonial region play in colonial settlement?

      • What were the major political, economic, and social differences between the colonies?




Attachments:

      • Handout: 3-Tab Graphic Organizer Instructions


TEKS: 5.9A, 5.9B, 5.11A, 5.14A, 5.14B, 5.22A

ELABORATE – Comparing Colonial Times to Today

Suggested Day 3 (cont’d) – 20 minutes

    1. Students think about similarities between activities in colonial times and today and jot down some talking points.

  • What do we do today that is similar to the way it was done in colonial times? (push-pull factors related to choosing where we live, conducting economic activities related to geographic factors, why we choose certain leaders to make rules)




    1. Students form two concentric circles (one inside the other). Students in the circles face each other. (Make sure that each student has one partner across from them; if an odd number in the class, teacher may participate.)




    1. As music plays, the two circles walk in opposite directions. When the music stops, students pair up with the person across from them and share ideas about we do today that is similar to the way it was done in colonial times.




    1. Repeat several times.




    1. Students return to their seats and several student volunteers share the ideas they heard.




Purpose:

Students find commonalities between important factors in colonial times and today.


TEKS: 5.1A, 5.1B, 5.22A, 5.22B, 5.24B, 5.25D


EVALUATE

Suggested Day 4 – 50 minutes

  1. Create a 3-column chart summarizing the leader of the colony, its political (government) economic (industries), social (religion), and geographic (natural resources, climate, landforms) attributes of a chosen colony from each region (New England, middle, southern). Explain with an illustration how an individual or a geographic feature contributed to the colonies’ uniqueness. (5.1A, 5.1B; 5.11A; 5.14A, 5.14B; 5.22A, 5.22C; 5.24B; 5.25D)

  • 1C, 1E; 5F




  1. If desired, distribute the Handout: Comparing Colonies for students to use. (Students can create their own chart that meets the criteria.)




  1. In each box students describe the appropriate factors and illustrate the colony’s uniqueness.

Attachments:

  • Handout: Comparing Colonies (optional, 1 per student)

  • Teacher Resource: Handout: Comparing Colonies KEY


TEKS: 5.1A, 5.1B; 5.9A; 5.9B; 5.11A; 5.14A, 5.14B; 5.22A, 5.22C; 5.24B; 5.25D



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