Delaware Recommended Curriculum



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Delaware Recommended Curriculum

This unit has been created as an exemplary model for teachers in (re)design of course curricula. An exemplary model unit has undergone a rigorous peer review and jurying process to ensure alignment to selected Delaware Content Standards.



Unit Title: American Revolution

Designed by: Lisa Prueter

District: Appoquinimink

Modified by: Jeff Twardus and Becky Reed, Red Clay

Content Area: Social Studies

Grade Level: 4

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Summary of Unit

This unit uses the American Revolution as a case study in which students create chronologies using timelines and identify cause-and-effect relationships. In addition, students examine primary documents in order to understand the motives for rebellion.

In Lesson One, students investigate the causes and effects of one event that contributed to tensions between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies. Students share what they have learned with one another. Students then choose the three most important events that led to the Revolution and use a graphic organizer to arrange those events chronologically.

In Lesson Two, students analyze the Declaration of Independence. They compare the grievances listed in the Declaration to the reservations expressed by Delaware Founding Father John Dickinson, who refused to sign the Declaration.

In Lesson Three, students research one battle of the Revolution and consider the battle’s importance in the outcome of the war. Students share what they have learned with one another. Students then choose the three most important battles in the war and use a graphic organizer to arrange those battles chronologically.

Stage 1 – Desired Results

What students will know, do, and understand



____________________________________________________________

Delaware Content Standards

History Standard One 4-5a: Students will study historical events and persons within a given time frame in order to create a chronology and identify related cause-and-effect factors.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.3


Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2


Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7


Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

Big Ideas

  • Chronology

  • Cause and Effect

Unit Enduring Understanding

  • A historian must logically organize events, recognize patterns and trends, explain cause and effect, make inferences, and draw conclusions from available resources.

Unit Essential Questions

  • How can we use historical materials to understand cause-and-effect relationships?

Knowledge and Skills

Students will know…



  • Benchmark vocabulary: chronology, cause-and-effect

  • The events that led to the American Revolution

  • The battles that resulted in American independence

  • The principles and grievances in the Declaration of Independence

Students will be able to…

  • Use a timeline to create a chronology of historical events

  • Use a timeline to apply the concept of cause and effect

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Evidence that will be collected to determine whether or not Desired Results are achieved

___________________________________________________________________

Transfer Task

Students will create an Action Timeline (Handout 1) that begins with the French and Indian War (1763), peaks with the Declaration of Independence (1776), and concludes with the Treaty of Paris (1783).

The graphic organizer includes three causes of the American Revolution and three key battles of the Revolutionary War.

Students will write a short reflection that defends their choices of the three causes and three battles.



Rubric

Scoring Category

This product provides…

Score Point 5

Score Point 3

Score Point 1

A timeline of three causes of the American Revolution and explanations of their historical importance

Three causes are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each cause is clearly explained.

Three causes are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each cause is somewhat clearly explained

Fewer than three causes are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each cause is not clearly explained.

A timeline of three battles of the American Revolution and explanations of their historical importance


Three battles are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each battle is clearly explained.

Three battles are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each battle is somewhat clearly explained

Fewer than three battles are arranged in chronological order; the historical importance of each battle is not clearly explained.


Total Score: _________
Above the Standard: 8-10

Meets the Standard: 6-7

Below the Standard: 0-5

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Design learning activities to align with Stage 1 and Stage 2 expectations

___________________________________________________________________

Lesson One: The Causes of the American Revolution

Essential Question


  • How can using a timeline help us understand cause-and-effect relationships?

Materials Needed

  • Images of Symbols for Class Viewing

  • Class set of Handouts 1-4, 6-6a.

  • Copies of Handout 5 for groups of 2-3 students

  • No More Kings” video

  • Attached Bibliography

Strategy One: Gathering Information – Picture Prediction

Begin the unit by reviewing with students the colonization of the eastern seaboard by European settlers since the early 1600s.

Introduce the lesson by showing students symbols for Great Britain, France, Native Americans, and warfare.

For example:















Ask students to write down any words they think of when they look at these pictures. Tell students to write what they think we will be studying in this lesson. Share responses.

Strategy Two: Gathering Information about the French and Indian War

Tell students that we are beginning this unit in 1754, when the nations of Europe engaged in a long, global conflict called the Seven Years’ War. The part of this war that took place in North America between France and England is called The French and Indian War.

Ask students to use the BIG strategy as they read about the French and Indian War in Handout 2.

B

List the BOLD words






I

List the words in italics






G

Describe the graphics






Teachers should guide students in completing the Cause-and-Effect Graphic Organizer (Handout 3) for the French and Indian War.

Note to Teachers

Native American groups allied with both the British and the French. French Canadians call this conflict the War of Conquest.

Click Handout 4 for the Check for Understanding.
Rubric

2 – This response identifies Map A with an accurate and relevant explanation.

1 – This response identifies Map A with an inaccurate, irrelevant, or no explanation.

Strategy Three: Extending and Refining through Research

Assign groups of 2-3 students to research one of the following events that led to war between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies. Using books and the Internet (see bibliography for helpful sources), students should complete the Cause-and-Effect Graphic Organizer B (Handout 5) for their event. Students should produce one final graphic organizer per group.



Events

  1. Proclamation of 1763

  2. Stamp Act

  3. Quartering Act

  4. Townshend Acts

  5. Boston “Massacre”

  6. Boston Tea Party

  7. Intolerable Acts

  8. Lexington and Concord

  9. First Continental Congress

  10. Battle of Bunker Hill

For each event on timeline, have students write two headlines - one from the British perspective and one from the colonist perspective.

Rubric for Cause-and-Effect Graphic Organizer

Scoring Category

This product provides…

Score Point 3

Score Point 2

Score Point 1

An explanation of the causes of this event.

The historical causes of this event are clearly explained.

The historical causes of this event are somewhat clearly explained.


The historical causes of this event are not clearly explained.


An explanation of the effects of this event

The historical effects of this event are clearly explained.

The historical effects of this event are somewhat clearly explained.


The historical causes of this event are not clearly explained.


Identification of the Who, What, When, and Where of this event


All four facts about the events are clearly stated.

All four facts about the event are somewhat clearly stated.

Fewer than four facts are clearly explained.

Headlines for this event from the British and Patriot perspectives


Headlines accurately represent the event from British and Patriot perspectives

Headlines somewhat accurately represent the event from British and Patriot perspectives

Headlines do not accurately represent the event from British and Patriot perspectives


Total Score: _________
Above the Standard: 10-12

Meets the Standard: 7-9

Below the Standard: 0-6

Gallery Walk: Hang Graphic Organizers around the room. One student from each group stays with the graphic organizer, while the student(s) rotates through each event, taking notes on the Two-Column Chart (Handout 6). A Teacher’s Guide with suggested answers is provided (Handout 6a).

Once all students have rotated through the gallery, have groups reconvene to compare notes and share information with the student who stayed with graphic organizer.



Check for Understanding

  • “Taxation without Representation” was one major cause of the American Revolution. What is one example of taxation without representation? Explain your answer.

Rubric

2 – This response gives a valid example with an accurate and relevant explanation.

1 – This response gives a valid example with an inaccurate, irrelevant, or no explanation.

Strategy Three: Application

Students consider the 10 causes, then choose only three as the most important. Have students share their selections. Emphasize that students will have different answers; which events are most important is a matter of interpretation.

Review Action Timeline (Handout 1). This is similar to plot diagrams students have used in ELA: Initiating Action, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution. Explain that we can use this same diagram to understand stories in history.

Ask students to complete the left hand - Rising Action - side of the graphic organizer with the three events that they identified. Students explain why these three events are most important.



Check for Understanding #1

  • If you had to choose just one, which event was the most important in leading to conflict between England and the colonies? Explain your answer.

Rubric

2 – This response identifies an event with an accurate and relevant explanation.

1 – This response identifies an event with an inaccurate, irrelevant, or no explanation.

Check for Understanding #2


  • Show students No More Kings (2:59) from Schoolhouse Rock

  • What does the video identify as the main cause of the Revolution? Do you think this is a fair and accurate explanation of the Revolution? Explain your answer.

Rubric

2 – This response identifies taxation with an accurate and relevant explanation.

1 – This response identifies taxation with an inaccurate, irrelevant, or no explanation.

Lesson Two: The Declaration of Independence

Essential Question


  • How can we use primary sources to determine cause-and-effect relationships?

Materials Needed

  • Handouts 7-8 for each student

  • Handouts 9-13 for each group

  • Image of signers of the Declaration

  • Image of Pie chart below

  • For Strategy Four:




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