December 2015 / January 2016 Teacher's Guide for a moldy Situation: Chemistry Cleans Up Table of Contents



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December 2015 / January 2016 Teacher's Guide for
A Moldy Situation: Chemistry Cleans Up
Table of Contents



In-Class Activities 18



About the Guide

Teacher’s Guide editors William Bleam, Regis Goode, Donald McKinney, Barbara Sitzman and Ronald Tempest created the Teacher’s Guide article material. E-mail: bbleam@verizon.net


Susan Cooper prepared the anticipation and reading guides.
Patrice Pages, ChemMatters editor, coordinated production and prepared the Microsoft Word and PDF versions of the Teacher’s Guide. E-mail: chemmatters@acs.org
Articles from past issues of ChemMatters can be accessed from a DVD that is available from the American Chemical Society for $42. The DVD contains the entire 30-year publication of ChemMatters issues, from February 1983 to April 2013.
The ChemMatters DVD also includes Article, Title and Keyword Indexes that covers all issues from February 1983 to April 2013.
The ChemMatters DVD can be purchased by calling 1-800-227-5558.
Purchase information can be found online at www.acs.org/chemmatters.

Student Questions


    1. What are the symptoms displayed by a person with an allergy to mold?

    2. What type of organism is mold?

    3. What are the three basic conditions needed for mold to grow?

    4. What are some of the common food sources for mold growing in a warm and humid house?

    5. How does a person develop an allergy in general and specifically to mold?

    6. What steps can be taken to eliminate mold spores in a house?

    7. What happens as steam is cooled and condenses to liquid water?

    8. How does sweating cool the body?



Answers to Student Questions


      1. What are the symptoms displayed by a person with an allergy to mold?

The symptoms displayed by a person with an allergy to mold include a runny nose, itchy eyes, sneezing and coughing.

      1. What type of organism is mold?

Mold is a type of fungus that can be found almost everywhere on Earth.

      1. What are the three basic conditions needed for mold to grow?

Mold needs warmth, moisture and food to grow.

      1. What are some of the common food sources for mold growing in a warm and humid house?

Some of the food sources for mold include the paper surface of wall board (sheetrock), wood, carpet backing, soap scum, and dust as well as just about any food that people eat.

      1. How does a person develop an allergy in general and specifically to mold?

A person’s immune system reacts to foreign bodies, producing antibodies that “fight” (react against) the foreign bodies, such as mold spores. Included in this reaction is the production of histamines, which causes vasodilation (widening of blood vessels) in the nose to block the entry of the foreign particles. Overreaction in the blood vessels produces runny nose, sneezing, and watery eyes.

      1. What steps can be taken to eliminate mold spores in a house?

Ideally, one should eliminate the three conditions for mold to grow—warmth, moisture, and food for the mold. A house with cool air contains less atmospheric moisture than a house with warm air. In addition, the use of a dehumidifier will reduce the moisture in the air. And fans will help to dry the house interior. The source of the moisture in a previously flooded house such as rugs, furniture coverings and cushions, books and magazines should be discarded. All hard surfaces such as walls, floors, furniture in a house that provide food for mold should be disinfected [added by editor].

      1. What happens as steam is cooled and condenses to liquid water?

As steam is cooled and condenses, hydrogen bonds begin to form between the molecules.

      1. How does sweating cool the body?

Molecules of water in the liquid water droplets from sweat are warmed by body heat. Their increased kinetic energy allows some of the water molecules to break the intermolecular forces of attraction and evaporate. These warmer molecules leave and take their extra heat with them, cooling the remaining sweat and thus lowering body temperature.

Anticipation Guide


Anticipation guides help engage students by activating prior knowledge and stimulating student interest before reading. If class time permits, discuss students’ responses to each statement before reading each article. As they read, students should look for evidence supporting or refuting their initial responses.
Directions: Before reading, in the first column, write “A” or “D,” indicating your agreement or disagreement with each statement. As you read, compare your opinions with information from the article. In the space under each statement, cite information from the article that supports or refutes your original ideas.


Me

Text

Statement







  1. Scientists estimate that fewer than 100,000 mold species exist on Earth.







  1. Most molds thrive in temperatures we have in our homes.







  1. Molds can use soap scum and dust for food.







  1. The blood vessels dilate unnecessarily in allergy sufferers.







  1. A histamine molecule has 3 nitrogen atoms.







  1. Sweat evaporates more readily when the humidity is high.







  1. Sweat helps cool your body when it evaporates.







  1. Cool air can hold more moisture than warm air.







  1. Removing energy causes water vapor to condense.







  1. Dehumidifiers are not very effective in controlling mold.



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