Cultural diversity literature reviewer index



Download 48.88 Kb.
Date29.05.2016
Size48.88 Kb.

ELED 472

Fall ’02

CULTURAL DIVERSITY LITERATURE

REVIEWER INDEX
Abucevicz: Kay, H. (1957). City springtime. (RURAL/URBAN LIVING)

Baker: Ammon, R. (1996). An Amish Christmas. (AMISH)

Beal: Mosel, A. (1968). Tikki tikki tembo. . (CHINESE)

Beeman: Mosel, A. (1968). Tikki tikki tembo.. (CHINESE)

Benjamin: Franco, Betsy. (2000). Why the frog has big eyes.

Bishop: Martin, R. (1992). The rough-faced girl. (ALGONQUIN INDIAN)

Burgess: Say, A. (1999). Tea with milk. (JAPANESE)

Clingerman: Goingback, O. (1997). The gift. (KIOWA INDIAN)

Clise: Bunting, E. (1995). Cheyenne again. (CHEYENNE INDIAN)

Corbin: Bell, L. (1996). The Sea maidens of Japan. (JAPANESE)

Cromer: Cohen, B. (1983). Molly's pilgrim.

Dicken: Seeger, P. (1986). Abiyoyo. (SOUTH AFRICAN)

Dyson: Wisniewski, D. (1991). Rain player.

Ewing: Winter, J. (1991) Diego. (MEXICAN ARTIST)

Folk: dePaola, T. (1988). The legend of the Indian paintbrush.

Francella: Mitchell, R. (1997). The talking cloth. (AFRICAN-AMERICAN)

Frantz: Ardema, V. (1975). Why mosquitos buzz in people’s ears. (W. AFRICAN)

Helmstetter: dePaola, T. (1988). The legend of the Indian Paintbrush. (NATIVE AM.)

Hopkins: Tompert, A. (1998). Saint Patrick. (IRISH)

Kennedy: Kroll, V. (1997). Masai and I. (KENYA; MASAI)

Ketterman: dePaola, T. (1988). The legend of the Indian Paintbrush. (NATIVE AM.)

Kuhn: Martin, R. (1992). The rough-faced girl. (ALGONQUIN INDIAN)

Lockard: Yolan, J. (1992). Encounter. (N. AMERICAN & COLUMBUS)

Manley: Rosen, M. (1995). Bonesy and Isabel. (EL SALVADOREAN)

McDonald: Say, A. (1993). Grandfather's Journey. (JAPANESE-AMERICAN)

McKenzie: Burton, V. (1978). The little house. (RURAL/URBAN LIVING)

Miller: Mosel, A. (1968). Tikki tikki tembo. (CHINESE)

Nelson: dePaola, T. (1988). The legend of the Indian Paintbrush. (NATIVE AM.)

Orndorff: dePaola, T. (1983). The legend of the bluebonnet. (N. AMERICAN)

Petersheim: San Souci, R. (1994). Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella story. (NATIVE AM.)

Pickar: Wing, N. (1996). Jalapeño bagels. (HISPANIC & JEWISH FAMILY)

Quesenberry: Uchida, Y. (1993). The bracelet. (JAPANESE-AMERICAN)

Raines: Tompert, A. (1990). Grandfather Tang's story. (CHINESE)

Robertson: dePaola, T. (1983). The legend of the bluebonnet. (NATIVE AMERICAN)

Sagal: Miles, M. (1971). Annie and the old one. (NAVAJO INDIAN)

Saturday: Wisniewski, D. (1994). The wave of the sea-wolf. (NATIVE AMERICAN)

Shirk: Cohen, B. (1983). Molly's pilgrim. (RUSSIAN-AMERICAN)

Spivey: Bunting, E. (1999). I have an olive tree. (GREEK)

Stark: Say, A. (1993). Grandfather's Journey. (JAPANESE-AMERICAN)

Sugar: Mayer, M. & Mayer, G. (1992). A very special critter. (PHYSICAL DISABILITY)

Sweeney: Goingback, O. (1997). The gift. (KIOWA INDIAN)

Whitehurst: Ringgold, F. (1992). Aunt Harriet's underground railroad in the sky. (AF-AM)

Windsor: Gerson, M. (1995) People of corn: A Mayan story. (S. AM. NATIVES)

Yommer: Wisniewski, D. (1991). Rain player. (NATIVE AMERICAN)


SUBJECT INDEX



AMISH:

Ammon, R. (1996). An Amish Christmas. (AMISH)


AFRICAN/AFRICAN-AMERICAN:

Ardema, V. (1975). Why mosquitos buzz in people’s ears. (W. AFRICAN)

Kroll, V. (1997). Masai and I. (KENYA; MASAI)

Mitchell, R. (1997). The talking cloth.

Ringgold, F. (1992). Aunt Harriet's underground railroad in the sky.

Seeger, P. (1986). Abiyoyo. (SOUTH AFRICAN)


CHINESE:

Mosel, A. (1968). Tikki tikki tembo.

Tompert, A. (1990). Grandfather Tang's story.
DISABILITIES:

Mayer, M. & Mayer, G. (1992). A very special critter.


GREEK:

Bunting, E. (1999). I have an olive tree.


HISPANIC:

Wing, N. (1996). Jalapeño bagels. (MEXICAN)

Rosen, M. (1995). Bonesy and Isabel. (EL SALVADOREAN)
IRISH:

Tompert, A. (1998). Saint Patrick.


JAPANESE/JAPANESE-AMERICAN:

Bell, L. (1996). The Sea maidens of Japan.

Say, A. (1999). Tea with milk.

Say, A. (1993). Grandfather's Journey.

Uchida, Y. (1993). The bracelet.
JEWISH:

Wing, N. (1996). Jalapeño bagels.


MEXICAN:

Seeger, P. (1986). Abiyoyo. (SOUTH AFRICAN)


NATIVE AMERICANS:

Bunting, E. (1995). Cheyenne again. (CHEYENNE)

dePaola, T. (1983). The legend of the Bluebonnet.

dePaola, T. (1988). The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush.

Gerson, M. (1995) People of corn: A Mayan story. (S. AMERICAN)

Goingback, O. (1997). The gift. (KIOWA)

Martin, R. (1992). The rough-faced girl. (ALGONQUIN)

Miles, M. (1971). Annie and the old one. (NAVAJO)

San Souci, R. (1994). Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella story. (OJIBWA)

Wisniewski, D. (1991). Rain player.

Wisniewski, D. (1994). The Wave of the Sea-Wolf.

Yolan, J. (1992). Encounter.


RURAL/URBAN LIVING:

Burton, V. (1978). The little house.

Kay, H. (1957). City springtime.
RUSSIAN-AMERICAN:

Cohen, B. (1983). Molly's pilgrim.




AUTHOR INDEX WITH DESCRIPTIONS



Ammon, R. (1996). An Amish Christmas. New York: Aladdin Paperbacks.
The story is about the Christmas traditions celebrated by the Amish.
Ardema, V. (1975). Why mosquitos buzz in people’s ears. New York: Scholastic, Inc.
This West African tale is about a mosquito who annoys one animal and because of that causes a lot of mischief in the jungle, but the mosquito gets what’s coming to him in the end. (Brandon Frantz)
Baquedano, E. (1993). Aztec, Inca & Maya. New York: Eyewitness Books.
This book gives a lot of information on the Aztec, Inca and the Mayans. It talks about the food they eat, shelter, clothing, head gears, cookware and a lot of

other great information. (Laura Windsor)


Bell, L. (1996). The sea maidens of Japan. Tennessee: Hambleton-Hill

Publishing, Inc.

This book delves into the culture shared by the Ama women of Japan, and the culture that they wish to continue through their daughters. The story deals with the challenges one girl faces. She is torn between the identity that her mother hopes she will come to embrace, and the identity which she struggles to live up to. (April Corbin)


Bunting, E. (1995). Cheyenne again. New York: Clarion Books.
This book is about a young Cheyenne boy who is forced to accept a different way of life, yet refuses to give up his dreams. (Linda Clise)

Bunting, E. (1999). I have an olive tree. USA: Harper Collins.
Sophia travels to Greece after her Grandfather dies, to discover her roots and heritage. (Jen Spivey)
Burton, V. (1978). The little house. Houghton Mifflin Co.
This book showed how the city was build-up around the country. (Amy McKenzie)
Cohen, B. (1983). Molly's pilgrim. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group.
Molly mother makes her a pilgrim doll for her class but is made fun of because her mother made a doll of herself since she is a modern pilgrim from Russia. (Joni Shirk)
Students in Molly’s class make fun of her for being different but they learn to accept her after discovering that she and her family are modern day pilgrims through a Thanksgiving assignment. (Sarah Cromer)
dePaola, T. (1983). The legend of the bluebonnet. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.
To often in life we walk around and take for granite what we have and never really count our blessings. This great American folk tale shows the consequences of

pride through a Comanche tribe. However, one girl who is willing to humble herself breaks the famine curse on her land and no longer is known as She-Who-Is-Alone.



(Brian Orndorff).
This book is the story of a brave Native American girl and how she made the bluebonnets bloom. (Tania Robertson).
dePaola, T. (1988). The legend of the Indian paintbrush. New York:

G.P. Putnam’s Sons.
This engaging book about the flower Indian Paintbrush tells the legend of a Native American boy, his place in his tribe as an artist and his quest to create the perfect painting of a sunset. (Cheri Helmstetter)
The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush is a Native American legend that tells about how a young boy receives the colors of the rainbow to use in his paintings.

(Teddy Ketterman)
This is a story is about a Naitive American legend about the Indian Paintbrush--the state flower of Wyoming. (Tiffany Nelson)
This is the story of how a Texas and Wyoming wildflower received its name through an Indian legend. (Mandi Folk)

Franco, B. (2000). Why the frog has big eyes. New York: Harcourt, Inc.

This book is a fairy tale written about a frog who enters a staring contest which is what gave him such big eyes. (Marian Benjamin)



Gerson, M. (1995). People of corn: A Mayan story. Canada: Little,

Brown & Company

This book is about several unsuccessful attempts to create grateful creatures, the Mayans used corn to create people that would be thankful. (Laura Windsor)


Goingback, O. (1997). The gift. Washington: The Wright Group.
This book about Kiowa Indians, one of the main tribes of the Southwest Plains, tells the story about a boy who struggles to find his "gift" or special talent, which is a common belief among the Indian people. (Shelly Clingerman)
The Gift was a great book that helps children to understand that you do not always know what your gift is and sometimes is takes an outsider to identify your gifts. (Shannon Sweeney)
Kay, H. (1957). City springtime. New York: Hasting House.
City Springtime is about taking a trip from the country to the city, and shows the diversity of rural living, urban living, and suburban living. (Amber Abucevicz)
Kroll, V. (1997). Masai and I. New York: First Aladdin Paperbacks.

This story is about a little girl named Linda who is studying about a country in East Africa called Kenya and a group of people called Masai. Linda imgaines imagine what her life would be like if she were Masai.and compares and contrasts her American lifestyle to the culture of the Masai people and experiences a wonderful "kinship" that makes her proud of both cultures. (Beth Kennedy)


Martin, R. (1992). The rough-faced girl. New York: Scholastic.

This is the Indian version of Cinderella; she is an Algonquin Indian.



(Christine Kuhn)
A young Native American girl learns that having a kind heart is a rewarding gift. (Carmen Bishop)
Mayer, M. & Mayer, G. (1992). A very special critter. New York:

Western Publishing Company.
A Very Special Critter is about a critter in a wheelchair who is

new to school; it deals with perceptions and misconceptions of the

other children. (Nichole Sugar)
Miles, M. (1971). Annie and the old one. Canada: Little, Brown and

Company.

Annie, a modern Navajo child, comes to terms with the inevitable death of her grandmother after trying unsuccessfully to sabotage the weaving done by her

mother. (Phyllis Sagal)
Mitchell, R. (1997). The talking cloth. New York: Orchard Books.
This is a realistic fiction story about the African American culture, relating to the Ashanti people of Ghana. (Mary Francella)
Mosel, A. (1968). Tikki tikki tembo. New York: Holt, Rinehart,

and Winston..


In this book two Chinese brothers fall into a well, but the first and honorable son has such a long name that his brother Chang might not be able to get help in time to save him. (Mandy Beeman)
The story of two young Chinese boys who do not listen to their mother and get into trouble. Mentions Chinese custom of using short names. (Mindy Miller)
This book focuses on Chinese traditional names, and how the

traditional naming of the first son has changed over history. This

book gives information from a child's perspective and on a child's

level of understanding. (Laura Beal)


Ringgold, F. (1992). Aunt Harriet's underground railroad in the sky. New

York, New York: Crown Publishers, Inc.
This is a creative story telling of a little girl’s journey to find her little brother, following the underground railroad her ancestors traveled. (Emily Whitehurst)
Rosen, M. (1995). Bonesy and Isabel. New York: Harcourt, Brace, and

Company
This is about the friendship that an adopted girl from El Salvador and

her adopted family's twelve year old black lab have. It is a real tear jerker.



(Frank Manley)
This book related a Native American version of the Cinderella story, allowing students to

make predictions and compare the book to the version of a story that they already knew.




San Souci, R. (1994). Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella story. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group.
This book related a Native American version of the Cinderella story, allowing students to

make predictions and compare the book to the version of a story that they already knew. (Steve Petersheim)


Say, A. (1999). Tea with milk. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
This book is about a Japanese girl moving to Japan with her family for the U.S. and she tries to adapt to the culture and living in Japan. (Erica Burgess)
Say, A. (1993). Grandfather's Journey. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
The author writes a story about his grandfather living in Japan

and eventually traveling to the New World to live. (Rick McDonald)


This book is about a Japanese immigrant who loves the land of both Japan and the United States; he grows to love and appreciate not only the mountains and rivers of each country but also the memories associated with them. (Lori Stark)
Seeger, P. (1986). Abiyoyo. New York: Scholastic.
ABIYOYO is adapted from a South African lullaby and folk

story. The book is about a father and son that are shoved out of the

community until they make the monster that haunts the village disappear.

(Chad Dicken)

Tompert, A. (1990). Grandfather Tang's story. New York: Crown


Publishers, Inc.
An integral part of Grandfather Tang's Story is the supernatural power of transformation by the fox fairies, which is illustrated with tangrams (ancient Chinese puzzles). (Janice Raines)
Tompert, A. (1998). Saint Patrick. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press.
This book talks about how Saint Patrick was born and grew up in Britain, then became the Bishop and patron saint of Ireland. The students will love this story, not because of what Saint Patrick did, but because Saint Patrick lived, and really was the bishop of Ireland. (Amy Hopkins).
Uchida, Y. (1993). The bracelet. New York. Philomel Books.

Emi, a Japanese-American, and her family are forced by the American government to live in a concentration camp because America is at war with Japan. (Kelli Quesenberry)


Wing, N. (1996). Jalapeño bagels. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
The book is about a boy whose parents are both Hispanic and Jewish, and he finds that jalapeño bagels represents them both. (Rachel Pickar)
Winter, J. (1991) Diego. New York: Dragonfly Books.
This is a book about the life of Diego Rivera, a famous Mexican artist. (Chris Ewing)
Wisniewski, D. (1991). Rain player. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
A Native American boy challenges the rain god to a game of pok-a-tok to try receive rain for the his people. (Carrie Yommer)
This book is about the Mayan Civilization. The story revolves around an

ancient Mayan game. (Jenn Dyson)


Wisniewski, D. (1994). The Wave of the Sea-Wolf. New York: Clarion Books.
A Native American princess fights the god of the sea to save her people from destruction and then the sea turns around and saves her people from the enemy (white English selttlers). (Jessica Saturday)
Yolan, J. (1992). Encounter. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

This book is a legend of a young Native American boy telling his story of when Chistopher Columbus arrived on his land changing his life forever.



(Kathy Lockard)


Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page