Csgr/cigi/unu-cris annual Conference Abstracts



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CSGR/CIGI/UNU-CRIS Annual Conference Abstracts


BOOK GROUP 4

Martin Albrow and Colin Bradford 4

Kennedy Graham 6

Patricia M. Goff 7

Mely Anthony(Panel Proposal) 8

PLENARY 9

Ramesh Thakur and Luk Van Langenhove 9

CSGR INVITES 10

Rita Giacalone 10

T.J. Pempel 12

Takashi Terada 14

CSGR ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS 15

Karoline Postel-Vinay 15

Brigitte Young 15

UNU-CRIS INVITES 17

Dr. Brigid Gavin 18

Ms. Tania Felicio 19

Golam Robbani 20

CIGI INVITES 21

Dr. Bessma Momani 21

CSGR STAFF & ASSOCIATES 22

HISTORY PANEL 23

Leandro Prados de la Escosura 23

Albert Carreras and Xavier Tafunell 23

Stephen Broadberry and Bishnupriya Gupta 24

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PANEL 25

Alan M. Rugman 25

Ben Rosamond 26

Alex Warleigh 27

Claudia Fabbri 28

CSGR STAFF, ASSOCIATES & VISITORS 29

Peter Newell 29

Professor Franklyn Lisk 31

Heribert Dieter 32

Lin Jue 33

Nicole Jackson 35

Rosalba Icaza Garza 36

Mzukisi Qobo 37

ABSTRACT GROUP I 38

Dr Jean F. Crombois 38

Epia Oke Edward 40

Par Engstrom 41

Shashank Krishna 43

Thomas G. Moore 44

Shaun Narine 45

Adam Sneyd 46

Kevin Young 47

ABSTRACT GROUP II 50

Mokbul Morshed Ahmad 50

Universität Bielefeld 51

Fakultät für Soziologie 51

Lehr- und Forschungsbereich Politikwissenschaft 51

David Camroux 53

Jillian Dowding, MA 55

Daniel Drache 57

T.Huw Edwards 58

Engelbert Altenburger 59

Carina Gerlach 61



Randall D. Germain 63

Myriam Martins Gistelinck, 64

Shintaro Hamanaka 65

Asma Hashmi 66

Lelio Iapadre 68

Mirjam Kars 70

Paulette Lloyd, PhD 73

Derek McDougall, 74

George Mavrotas 76

Andreas Nabor 77

Dr Helen E S Nesadurai 78

Peter North 79

Austina J. Reed 80

Reuben Martine 81

Aaron Schneider 84

Aparna Shivpuri Singh 85

Yul Sohn 86

Charalambos Tsardanidis 89

Ernesto Vivares 90

Douglas Webber 92

Paul D. Williams 93

CO-AUTHOR GROUP 94



Omano Edigheji 96

Jules Duchastel, Raphaël Canet and Simon Perrault 97

Ana Paula A. Silva** 99

PANEL PROPOSAL 113

Dr Nicholas Thomas 113

Stefan Wolff 116

Stephen Woolcock 119

LATE SUBMISSION 129

Sujata Jhamb 129

Robbie Robertson 130

Paul Close 131

Irina Semenenko 137



BOOK GROUP

Warwick paper prospectus


Regions after Globalization:

the Challenge of Global Goals



Martin Albrow and Colin Bradford

There are two major distinct discourses that feed into the debate about global regionalization. One surrounds the economic forces that promote defensive regional responses to globalization, or alternatively aggressive alliances to promote regional interests in a global economy. The other originates in strategic thinking about civilizational divides and the potential for global conflict roughly coterminous with a geographic North/West South/East split. The two discourses merge in the argument that globalization is the driver of geo-political conflict. This is an argument deserving of the serious consideration it gets from both left and right leaning theoreticians and activists. But we hold that this scenario is deterministic and accords undue importance to economic drivers.


We advance a view, not just of an alternative future, but one that suggests a different agenda for policy makers and globally concerned citizens. As Sachs argues globalization per se offers no determinate outcome for any particular country; the policy mix for countries, and e fortiori regions, may be very different depending on their specific relation to the global economy and their cultural concerns. Regional integration is not then determined only by economic circumstances. But neither does it depend simply on cultural affinities and historical ties. China and Japan have as many reasons to be disengaged as engaged with each other; the same applies to Mexico and the United States. Here too policy choices matter. Here too the WTO in particular has to acknowledge the inevitable existence of the non-economic determinants of regional barriers
We then offer policy as an alternative to either economic geography or civilizational affinities. And the policy may reflect power and purposes as much as economic interests or cultural heritage. Here we regard regional responses in respect of the Millennium Development Goals as a test case for our thesis. They have been established as goals for humankind, in some cases repairing, in other cases utilizing economic globalization, but equally transcending cultural difference. Yet manifestly there are regional differences in relation to those goals. The United States and European approaches differ distinctly; Asian countries have specific concerns, while Africa for all is the most important beneficiary.
In the attainment of goals power is the first requirement, in two respects, the first to ensure the underlying security and stability without which no goal attainment is possible, the second to supply some of the means to the chosen ends. But not all goals require the same kind of military power; also necessary is knowledge and value commitment. In the global field the United States has military domination, and it falls to others to secure such goals as environmental sustainability. Currently the rhetoric of European leaders reflects such a functional division of responsibilities on a global scale as they make sustainability a core idea for the European Union. In doing so they acknowledge the effective monopoly of security issues exercised by the US. How Asian countries respond to global challenges is less defined, but emphasis on family and health values may increasingly reflect their contribution to the MDGs.
We propose to write a paper exploring economic, cultural and policy distinctions with an eye to regional perspectives which contribute to taming globalisation or to fragmenting global society and politics, or to shaping unique roles in a global division of labor in achieving global goals or to some other outcome which impacts upon conceptualising the interrelationship between regionalization and globalization and to understanding regionalisation, multilateral institutions and the shaping of the global polity.
Martin Albrow Colin Bradford

albrowm@hotmail.com cbradford@brookings.edu

Visiting Fellow Visiting Fellow

Centre for the Study of Global Governance Economic Studies

London School of Economics The Brookings Institution

London Washington



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