Criminal Justice (vcrimj)


Embedded English Language Arts and Literacy



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Embedded English Language Arts and Literacy


CVTE Learning Standard Number

Strand Coding Designation Grades ELAs
Learning Standard Number


Text of English Language Arts Learning Standard

2.B.01

(WHST)8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

Performance Example: Student will research, prepare, and present a paper on the history of the Massachusetts Trial Court and the importance of the system in the administration and enforcement of the law in our state.    

2.C.01

Writing 9-12 #4


4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)


Performance Example: Students will prepare a clear and coherent written investigative report demonstrating the use of appropriate police procedures, relevant data and accurate field notes.

2.B.01


2.B.02

2.B.03


2.C.01

2.C.02


2.C.03

Writing 9-12 #1 a-e



Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.



Performance Example: Students will analyze a crime scenario to determine whether probably cause or reasonable suspicion standards have been met, and present their findings in well-organized, objective writing.

2.B.02

2.B.03


2.C.02

Speaking 9-10 #3, 4, 6

3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.


Performance Example: Students will participate in a Moot Court and will present information, findings, and supporting evidence in a mock trial.

2A – 2E

WHST 9-10 #2 a-b

Writing Grades 11-12 #1


Speaking 9-10 #4



2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

a. Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
1. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task


Performance Example: Students will create a crime scene notebook explaining the proper procedures in investigating and processing a crime scene. Some entries will be one time reflective experience based entries. Some entries will be over a longer duration such as components to a research study including background information, data collection, and analysis.

2E

WHST 11-12 #6

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Performance Example: Students will work as part of a cooperative team to prepare one lesson plan and one public service announcement to promote safe technology use.

2.D.01

2.C.07


RI Grades 11-12 #1

  1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Performance Example: Students will select an article that relates to case investigation and witness interviews, and create an open response question that aligns to the article, including what it directly states and what is inferred and or left uncertain. 

2.2.B.04

W2 a-b

2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.


Performance Examples: Using a selected case study, students will apply the Massachusetts Rules of Evidence and write an informative/explanatory essay that includes a well-developed topic using facts, definitions, and concrete details and quotations as examples for clarification.

Embedded Mathematics


CVTE Learning Standard Number

Math Content Conceptual Category and Domain Code
Learning Standard Number


Text of Mathematics Learning Standard

2A.01

6.RP1

N.Q.1


Understand the concept of a ratio & use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship between two quantities.
Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

Performance Example:  Students will record, monitor and compare the weekly body fat-to-muscle ratio of a family member over a month and determine body fat-to-muscle gain or loss for the month and prepare a presentation that includes graphs and data displays.

2.C.02

4.G.3

7.RP.1 
4. MD (Measurement and Data)



Recognize a line of symmetry for a two dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

Compute unit rates associated with ratios of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas, and other quantities measured in like or different units.

Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit.

Represent and interpret data.

Geometric measurement: Understand concepts of angle and measure angles.


Performance Example: Students will use symmetry and proportion to identify and apply the principles of three-dimensional documentation in a crime scene investigation.

2.C.02

G-CO.3

G-GPE.6

G-CO.9
4. MD (Measurement and Data)


Know precise definitions of angle, circle, perpendicular line, parallel line, and line segment, based on the undefined notions of point, line, distance along a line, and distance around a circular arc.
Find the point on a directed line segment between two given points that partitions the segment in a given ratio.
Prove theorems about lines and angles. Theorems include: vertical angles are congruent; when a transversal crosses parallel lines, alternate interior angles are congruent and corresponding angles are congruent; points on a perpendicular bisector of a line segment are exactly those equidistant from the segment’s endpoints.

Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit.

Represent and interpret data.

Geometric measurement: Understand concepts of angle and measure angles.




Performance Example: Students will review a motor vehicle crash scenario, analyze skid marks and use precision measurements to calculate the direct distance from the point of striking impact to where the vehicle landed.

2.C.01


7.SP

S-IC.3, 4, 5, 6.




Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.

1. Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.

2. Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an unknown characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the same size to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions.
Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.

Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion; develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling.

Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant.

Evaluate reports based on data.



Performance Example: Students will work in a cooperative group to develop and implement a sample survey to find out where their classmates generally stand with respect to the death penalty; students will prepare a brief presentation to present their findings.



Embedded Science and Technology/Engineering

Life Science (Biology)


CVTE Learning Standard Number

Subject Area,
Topic Heading and
Learning Standard Number


Text of Biology Learning Standard

2.C.02

Genetics

3.1 Describe the basic structure (double helix, sugar/phosphate backbone, linked by complementary nucleotide pairs) of DNA, and describe its function in genetic inheritance.

3.2 Describe the basic process of DNA replication and how it relates to the transmission and conservation of the genetic code. Explain the basic processes of transcription and translation, and how they result in the expression of genes. Distinguish among the end products of replication, transcription, and translation.




Performance Example: Students will work in cooperative groupings and use presentation media, such as PowerPoint, to diagram the basis structure of DNA and how the process of DNA replication is applied in criminal investigations.

2.C.02

8.SP

4. Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables.

Performance Example: Students will design and conduct a scientific investigation demonstrating how ratios and proportions can be used to figure out someone’s height based on their footprints.


Physical Science (Physics)


CVTE Learning Standard Number

Subject Area,
Topic Heading and
Learning Standard Number


Text of Physics Learning Standard

2.C.02

Motion and Forces


1.2 Distinguish between displacement, distance, velocity, speed, and acceleration. Solve problems involving displacement, distance, velocity, speed, and constant acceleration.

1.3 Create and interpret graphs of 1-dimensional motion, such as position vs. time, distance vs. time, speed vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time where acceleration is constant.



Performance Example: Students will participate in a speed detection demonstration and research the technology used in radar and lidar.

2.C.02

Scientific Inquiry Skills (SIS)


SIS2. Design and conduct scientific investigations.

Employ appropriate methods for accurately and consistently



    • making observations

    • making and recording measurements at appropriate levels of precision

    • collecting data or evidence in an organized way

Performance Example: Students will work as a team to evaluate a crime scene and apply accepted professional protocol in documenting and preserving evidence.

2.D.01

Scientific Inquiry Skills (SIS)

Observe the world from a scientific perspective.

Pose questions and form hypotheses based on personal observations, scientific articles, experiments, and knowledge.

Read, interpret, and examine the credibility and validity of scientific claims in different sources of information, such as scientific articles, advertisements, or media stories.




Performance Example: Students will research a local case involving juvenile crime and prepare hypothetical outcomes of the case.



History

CVTE Learning Standard Number

Subject Area,
Topic Heading and
Learning Standard Number


Text of History Learning Standard

2.B

2.C


2.D

USG.5.9

Together with other students, identify a significant public policy issue in the community, gather information about that issue, fairly evaluate the various points of view and competing interests, examine ways of participating in the decision making process about the issue, and draft a position paper on how the issue should be resolved.

Performance Example: Students will work as a team to identify a law that should be changed or a law that needs to be passed and prepare a position paper highlighting their collective view points.

2.B

2.C


2.D

USG.5.10

Practice civic skills and dispositions by participating in activities such as simulated public hearings, mock trials, and debates.


Performance Example: Students will work attend committee hearings and legislative sessions to give testimony and assist in passing new legislation.

2.B

2.C



USG.5.7

Analyze and evaluate decisions about rights of individuals in landmark cases of the United States Supreme Court such as Whitney v. California (1927), Stromberg v. California (1931), Near v. Minnesota (1931), Brandenburg v. Ohio (1969), Texas v. Johnson (1989), and Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1997).

Performance Example: Given a crime scene scenario of a landmark case, students will complete a thorough investigation of the facts and prepare a brief synopsis (200–350 words) detailing their findings to be used in a five minute persuasive oral presentation.


DESE Statewide Articulation Agreements

No Statewide Articulation Agreements at this time.


Industry Recognized Credentials (Licenses and Certifications/Specialty Programs)
National Academies of Emergency Dispatch Certification (911 Dispatch)
American Heart Association CPR/AED, First Aid – Adult, Child, Infant
FEMA Leadership in Emergency Management Certification
OSHA
Potential Certifications
FEMA Leadership in Emergency Management Train the Trainer
ISAFE (Internet/Computer Safety Certification)
Iris Scan Certified
Youth Court Certified
ICS 100 Certified (Incident Command System)
NIMS 700 Certified (National Incident Management System)
E-911 Telecommunicator http://www.mass.gov/eopss/crime-prev-personal-sfty/report-emergency/e911/
Accredited Legal Professional (ALP)   from NALS…the association for legal professionals

1 Note: Although most Framework Teams provided information for the “Appendix”, not all teams did. Therefore, sub-headings within the “Appendix” without information have been deleted.

Disclaimer: Reference in the Appendices Section to any specific commercial products, processes, or services, or the use of any trade, firm or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.


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