Crafting a Critical Analysis Text(s) or other formats



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Crafting a Critical Analysis
Text(s) or other formats: Immigrant Kids_& Child Labor in America 1908-1912 ______
Author(s): Russell Freedman & Lewis W. Hine__________________________________
Pages or Chapters: 40-44 & The Factory, Struggling Families______________________


  1. Summarize the main idea or theme of a text with supporting facts, ideas, or details. Give your reader a clear idea of what the author presented in the text.


When immigrants came to live in America, many of the children had to work to help support the family. In order for children to get an education, there were laws about children under the age of fourteen working; however, these laws weren’t enforced so they were broken. Young girls lied about their age so that they could work in stores. Children worked long hours in factories, hiding in wooden cases under shirtwaists whenever the inspector came in. During the busy season, children were often expected to work seven days a week.



  1. Critically examine the author’s presentation of the topic. Discuss the author’s point of view or purpose, craft and structure, and its effect on the reader.


In the beginning of the chapter, the author tells us about immigrants. He points out that an immigrant is someone who is a new to America and plans on staying. He explains that life for the immigrants was difficult so the whole family had to work. He uses this statement to take the reader to the important idea of the chapter, which is child labor. The author points out that there were laws against children working but lets us know that those laws didn’t really matter by telling us that children were seen working everywhere. The author did a nice job of making the information believable by using quotes from actual immigrants to explain what it was like back then. He also helps us visualize what life was like for the children during that time by using adjectives such as “stifling” and “starvation” as he described factory work. Without even saying the word “freedom”, the author leaves us realizing that America may not be the land of the free by ending this section of the text with a statement showing that immigrant children were forced into this way of life.

  1. Evaluate the writer’s theory or information. Remember, not all writing is created equal. Review the evidence in the text and evaluate the strength and validity of the author’s message

or
Evaluate content presented in diverse media or two or more texts that address similar themes or topics in order to compare the authors’ approach.
As I compared the information in Immigrant Kids by Russell Freedman to the photo presentation by Lewis W. Hine, I realized that both sources portrayed child labor in much the same way. They both showed children working for long hours at a very young age because of families struggling to make a living. However, Lewis Hine added some depth to the subject by showing children on their feet for long periods of time and children taking up smoking after working in a cigar factory.

While viewing Child Labor in America, I realized that there were many social issues that came about because of child labor. Children didn’t have the care they needed so many left home or started working at a young age. Working areas were unsanitary causing sickness to spread. These points were not brought up in the chapter that I read in Immigrant Kids.

In Immigrant Kids, the author tried to stay neutral on the subject of child labor. Even though the photographs and much of the information gave you a negative feeling about child labor, he brought up that the work wasn’t difficult and that everyone in the family worked together in order to survive in America. Hine’s photos and captions only presented feelings of sadness and poverty.

I feel that the information presented in Immigrant Kids was valid based on the primary source quotes and photos in the book and the photos and captions in Child Labor in America 1908-1912.

Immigrant Kids & Child Labor in America 1908-1912



Critical Analysis

When immigrants came to live in America, many of the children had to work to help support the family. In order for children to get an education, there were laws about children under the age of fourteen working; however, these laws weren’t enforced so they were broken. Young girls lied about their age so that they could work in stores. Children worked long hours in factories, hiding in wooden cases under shirtwaists whenever the inspector came in. During the busy season, children were often expected to work seven days a week.

In the beginning of the chapter, the author tells us about immigrants. He points out that an immigrant is someone who is a new to America and plans on staying. He explains that life for the immigrants was difficult so the whole family had to work. He uses this statement to take the reader to the important idea of the chapter, which is child labor. The author points out that there were laws against children working but lets us know that those laws didn’t really matter by telling us that children were seen working everywhere. The author did a nice job of making the information believable by using quotes from actual immigrants to explain what it was like back then. He also helps us visualize what life was like for the children during that time by using adjectives such as “stifling” and “starvation” as he described factory work. Without even saying the word “freedom”, the author leaves us realizing that America may not be the land of the free by ending this section of the text with a statement showing that immigrant children were forced into this way of life.

As I compared the information in Immigrant Kids by Russell Freedman to the photo presentation by Lewis W. Hine, I realized that both sources portrayed child labor in much the same way. They both showed children working for long hours at a very young age because of families struggling to make a living. However, Lewis Hine added some depth to the subject by showing children on their feet for long periods of time and children taking up smoking after working in a cigar factory.

While viewing Child Labor in America, I realized that there were many social issues that came about because of child labor. Children didn’t have the care they needed so many left home or started working at a young age. Working areas were unsanitary causing sickness to spread. These points were not brought up in the chapter that I read in Immigrant Kids.

In Immigrant Kids, the author tried to stay neutral on the subject of child labor. Even though the photographs and much of the information gave you a negative feeling about child labor, he brought up that the work wasn’t difficult and that everyone in the family worked together in order to survive in America. Hine’s photos and captions only presented feelings of sadness and poverty.

I feel that the information presented in Immigrant Kids was valid based on the primary source quotes and photos in the book and the photos and captions in Child Labor in America 1908-1912.


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