Course: Global Studies Theme: Revolution



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Course: Global Studies Theme: Revolution


Focus/Big Idea(s):

Social unrest

Nationalism

Resistance


Enduring Understanding(s):

Causes and outcomes of conflict.


Situations that require violent or non-violent actions by a nation/people.
Evaluating success of revolutions.
How would you define an unjust government?

Culminating Assignment:

Culminating Assessment:



  • Critical Response

  • DBQ

  • Essay

  • Imaginative Writing

  • Project




Essential Question(s):

What situations justify violent or non-violent methods for revolution?

How is the success of a revolution measured?

Are revolutions inevitable?








PPS Standards:

H.S. 2.1

H.S. 1.1

H.S. 5.1






Academic Vocabulary: (Content to Know)
Revolution, war, freedom, ideology, institution, regime, estates/classes, reign of terror, coup d’etat, guerilla, nationalism, communism, dictator, totalitarianism, propaganda, civil disobedience


Skills to learn:
Have students complete a DBQ using the primary source documents from Gandhi’s “Hind Swaraj” and “The Origin of Nonviolence” on text page 454. What do Gandhi’s writings suggest about his view of suffering?
Have students analyze examples of propaganda using the critical response rubric.


Time Frame: (in Hours)

Instructional Design: Outline of lessons, in step-by-step progression. Attach additional pages.


  1. Journal write or brainstorm about the essential question, “How would you define an unjust government?” Then discuss how should unjust governments be held accountable? From this discussion come up with a working definition of revolution.

  2. Introduce Crane Briton’s six stage “Model of a Revolution” on text page 273. Review the French Revolution text book pages 217-241. As they are reading students should keep a journal/take notes on how the French Revolution fits into “the model”. Encourage students to question the validity/accuracy of “the model”. Do they see things that don’t fit? How would they change “the model”?

  3. Lessons on the revolutions in Russia, refer to text pages 433-439 or History Alive! Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union. Have students create a Venn diagram comparing the French Revolution and the revolutions of Russia.

  4. Define propaganda and refer to the examples on text page 446. Have students analyze examples of propaganda using the critical response rubric.

  5. Lessons on the fall of imperial China and communist revolution of 1949. Refer to text pages 448-452 or History Alive! Communist China. Create a Venn diagram or T-chart to compare the communist revolution in Russia and the communist revolution in China.

  6. Analyze the ideas of modernization and nationalism as causes for revolution. What were the effects and were these revolutions successful in Russia and China?

  7. Lessons on the resistance movement in India refer to text pages 453-457.

  8. Have students complete a DBQ using the primary source documents from Gandhi’s “Hind Swaraj” and “The Origin of Nonviolence” on text page 454. What do Gandhi’s writings suggest about his view of suffering?

  9. Review the visual summary of Revolutionary leaders on text page 458. Have students create a chart of the revolutions studied including causes, events, key people and goals. Using the chart and previous notes they have taken, students could write a compare/contrast essay or an essay on the essential question, “Are revolutions inevitable?”



Resources and materials: (Text, links, videos, speakers, etc. Please note if available district-wide)
McDougall Littell Modern World History Text
History Alive!

Additional supports and extensions: (TAG, SPED, ESL, etc.)






Amanda Alonzon, 1/16/2021

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