Core values


Some Practical Applications for Honesty



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Some Practical Applications for Honesty:

• Don’t lie.

• Don’t cheat.

• Don’t steal the personal property or ideas of others.

• Keep your word.

• Be trustworthy.

• Do what you say you will do.

• Tell the whole truth regardless of the consequences.

Be loyal to your family, friends, religion, and country.

• Don’t gossip, spread rumors, or talk behind people’s backs.


Academic and Sports Program


Keep the Academic and Sports Program as part of your den meeting planning and demonstrating that it being honest by following the rules and not cheating makes the game fair for all. Information on the requirements for the various sports belt loops and pins can be found on-line at



http://www.scoutstuff.org/BSASupply/images/pdfs/34299_07_CS_SA_Guide.pdf and http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Cub%20Scouts/UniformsAndAwards/sanda.aspx

Discussion point: Honesty earns the trust of others.



http://www.kidsofintegrity.com/lessons/honesty/hands-options/honest-kid

An athlete’s honesty or lack of honesty plays a part in sports. The following article on Honesty in the sporting world can serve as a basis for your discussions with the scouts.

Share this true story of a seven-year-old boy named Tanner Munsey whose honesty in T-ball gained him a mention in Sports Illustrated magazine.

Tanner’s reputation for being honest earned him a mention in the “Scorecard” column in the July 10, 1989, issue of Sports Illustrated magazine.

During a T-ball game in Wellington, Florida, Tanner attempted to tag a player leaving first base. When the umpire called the player out, Tanner immediately informed the umpire that he hadn’t managed to tag the runner.

Two weeks later, Tanner encountered the same umpire in another T-ball game. This time, Tanner was playing short-stop and tagged a runner as they approached third base. When the umpire called the player safe, Tanner didn’t say a word, but the umpire noticed his surprise at the call.



“Did you tag the runner?” she asked Tanner. When Tanner affirmed that he had, the umpire changed her decision and called the player out. When the coaches and other parents protested, the umpire stood by her decision, informing them that she had learned to trust Tanner, because of his honesty.

Ask your Webelos what they would have done in Adam’s situation?




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