Chinese chinese 110 non-intensive elementary chinese I



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2014 Spring Courses Schedules are subject to CHANGE.

Please check SPIRE for the most current information.





asian languages & Literatures

spring 2014 courses
Chinese
CHINESE 110 NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE I

This is a beginning course of modern Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior exposure to the language. The content of this course includes: 1) An introduction to the Romanization phonetic system of Chinese (Pinyin); 2) Essential sentence structures and basic vocabulary in the area of greeting, self-introduction, family, hobbies and visiting friends; 3) Approximately 180 characters in simplified form. The major goal of this course in to help students develop the basic skill in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Equivalent to the first half of Chinese 126 in content. No prerequisites. 3 credits. *Offered in Spring only.

CHINESE 138 Religion in Chinese Culture (General Education G and I)

In this course we will explore the profound and important religious traditions of China – the Three Teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism – and their relationships to Chinese civilization and culture. You will meet Confucian sages, Chan/Zen Buddhist monks, and Taoist hermits and magicians as we study some of the world’s greatest meditations on the nature of both the Divine and the human. Along the way we will experience many of the riches of Chinese art and literature as we seek to understand their significance as religious expressions. Readings will be in English translation.




CHINESE 150 PEOPLES AND LANGUAGES OF CHINA

Social and cultural diversity in Chins through the elns of language. Three foci: classification of the minorities and their languages, language language contact and the formation of Chinese dialects, and the role of language in identifyling in identity ethnic groups and in maintaining distinct cultures. Conducted in English. No prerequisites and no knowledge of Chinese is required.



CHINESE 197Q Late Imperial Chinese Literature and Culture

This course is an introduction to the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) through various genres of literature, including the novel, classical short story, bannermen tale (zidishu), and poetry, with an emphasis on the cultural interaction that took place between the Manchu and Han peoples. 3 credits.



CHINESE 241 CONTEMPORARY CHINESE LITERATURE

The development of modern China as seen through its literature covering the period 1915-1989. Exploration of the relationship between writing and political change, the role of dissident writers, and the politics of gender in texts from mainland China and Taiwan. All readings are in English translation. This is a GenEd AL/G course. 3 credits



CHINESE 246 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

This is a continuation of Chinese 120 or 126. The content of this course includes: 1) training in pronunciation and tones, accuracy and fluency in speaking; 2) Approximately 350 Chinese character in simplified form; 3) Essential grammar and sentence structures; 4) Basic vocabulary and conversations in both formal and informal settings, and 5) Various aspects of Chinese culture, lifestyle and social-cultural conventions. The major goal of this course is to further develop students’ communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: Chinese 120/126. 6 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



CHINESE 247 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY CHINESE II: READING & WRITING (6 Credits)

This is a continuation of Chinese 127 designed for students with significant Chinese background in listening and speaking. This course provides advanced-beginning students with Mandarin Chinese language skills training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Reading and writing will be emphasized. Students will learn both Chinese language culture through content-based teaching materials and task-oriented activities. By the end of the semester, students will be able to comprehend and engage in basic conversations, to read simple authentic materials, and to write sentences and paragraphs. 6 credits.

Prerequisite: Chinese 126/127/120 or instructor’s permission. * Offered in spring semester only.

CHINESE 285 THATCHER LANGUAGE HOUSE

The Thatcher Chinese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course. To qualify for the Chinese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Chinese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor.

Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application. 2 credits.

CHINESE 327 INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II

Develops student's reading and speaking ability in Mandarin. Students should recognize approximately 1800 characters by year's end. Course will be centered around reading, as well as viewing and discussing several short plays from the People's Republic of China. Other assignments include frequent quizzes, unit exams, homework assignments, and class attendance. Prerequisite is Chinese 326 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



CHINESE 391G JUNIOR YEAR WRITING

All undergraduates are required by the University to complete a course in their major for the Junior Year Writing program in order to graduate. The principal thrust of the course will be toward the development of the student's skill in writing English academic and analytical prose, as well as the research that accompanies this writing. Prerequisite for the course is the successful completion of the University's College Writing (CW) requirements (English 112 or 113). 3 credit (1 credit as add on).

CHINESE 394PI CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE

This comprehensive survey of popular culture in modern China has two main purposes: first, providing a structured context for students to reflect on their learning in Chinese language, literature, and culture; second, enabling the students to explore and integrate the connections between their lived experience of Chinese culture and training through General Education in literature, film, history, sociology, political science, anthropology and communications. Students will engage with learning and experience through multiple ways. We will examine various forms of popular culture: newspaper, magazines, advertisements, popular literature, film, television, music, theater, folk arts, posters, fashion, festivities, digital media, etc. We will apply theories to actual cases and look at these cases contextually through a multifaceted perspective: cultural, socio-political, psychological, and ideological. Issues to consider throughout this course will cover: how to define popular culture in modern China? What is the relationship between popular and elite culture? How does popular culture work in structuring and shaping Chinese life? What role does popular culture play in Chinese pursuit of modernity and global membership? Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.




Chinese 427 ADVANCED CHINESE II (3 Credits)

This is the second semester of the third-year Chinese language course. It is a comprehensive course at the advanced level that intends to further develop students’ aptitudes in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of Mandarin Chinese, as well as discourse and/or pragmatic competence. In addition, the course focuses on the formal written Chinese.

Prerequisite: Chinese 427 or instructor’s permission. *Offered in fall semester only.



CHINESE 433 BUSINESS CHINESE

Introduction to the terminology and the basic business language skills for doing business in Chinese. Emphasize formal language style in business language use. Develops practical, cultural and social skills in doing business with and in China, as well as fluency in reading authentic texts and documents of business Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 426 or permission of the instructor.



CHINESE 498T PRACTICUM & TUTORIAL

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Chinese are assigned to work with one of the faculty/graduate students and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Chinese by hosting conversation tables outside of class. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1-3 credits.



CHINESE 577 CHINESE DIALECTOLOGY

Develops the ability to use source materials in Chinese linguistics. An historical survey of the nature and developments of Chinese grammatical and phonological students in three stages: Archaic, Ancient and Modern. Prerequisite: Chinese 375 or permission of the instructor.



CHINESE 581 TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Introduction to the theory and research related to Chinese and other foreign language teaching methods with emphasis on their application to Chinese teaching. Other topics include language pedagogy, lesson planning, teaching techniques, materials development, and testing and teacher development.



CHINESE 597K Buddhist and Taoist Literature

In this course we will read some of the greatest literature in the Chinese tradition, Buddhist and Taoist literature, much of which has spread throughout Korea and Japan, and has become increasingly recognized as profound contributions to the history of world literature. First we will explore the classics of the Taoist tradition, philosophers such as Laozi老子, Zhuangzi莊子, and Liezi列子, poets such as Tao Qian陶潛 and Li Bai李白, and the eccentric Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove竹林七賢. Then, we will turn to the classics of Buddhist literature. We will start with passages from crucial sutras (sacred and philosophical writings that convey the teachings of the Buddha) – the Heart Sutra心經, the Lotus Sutra蓮花經, and the Chan/Zen禪宗 Platform Sutra六祖壇經, and the teachings of Linji/Rinzai臨済 – and move on to poets such as Xie Lingyun謝靈運, Wang Wei王維 and Hanshan/Kanzan寒山 (Cold Mountain). The prerequisite for this course is Chinese 450 Elementary Classical Chinese or the equivalent. *This course may be taken as the second semester of pre-modern Chinese required for the Chinese Major.



CHINESE 597P Traditional Chinese Drama and Performing Arts

This course introduces the major aspects of Chinese theater from its origins in early Chinese history to the present.  Through a survey of traditional opera and storytelling, this course aims to explore both the artistic values intrinsic to the Chinese theatrical tradition and the social values or forces related to this tradition. 3 credits.



CHINESE 691A GRADUATE SEMINAR

Topic determined by the fields and interests of the students enrolled in the course. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.




Japanese
JAPANESE 110 NON-INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE

Beginning non-intensive course in modern standard Japanese. Students will develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Equivalent to the first half of Japanese 126 in content. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 1-4). No prerequisites. 3 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE 143 LIT-CLASSICAL & MEDIEVAL

Japanese 143 is a lecture survey course with as much time as possible devoted to discussion. Students will read, in English translation, the supreme masterpiece of Japanese literature, The Tale of Genji (ca. 1010), which is also the world's first novel and the only world classic written by a woman. Startlingly different from Murasaki Shikibu's subtle romance about the elegant Heian court is The Tale of the Heike, a warrior epic inspired by the political intrigues and the horrors of the Genpei War (1180-1185). This second monumental work of Japanese literature was first transmitted orally by blind itinerant monks who recited episodes pitching the rise of a samurai honor culture against the fall of courtly society to the percussive sound of the lute-like biwa. The Tale of the Heike (compiled in 1371) belongs, like Homer's Iliad, to a male oral tradition. Students are encouraged to link humanistic, aesthetic, and religious values to literary expression, visual culture, and cultural transformation. Class participation (depending on class size) and four quizzes; three papers. There are no prerequisites. This is a General Education AL/G course. 4-credits



JAPANESE 197G BUDDHIST CULTURES IN THE WORLD

In this course, students will first examine some of the basic teachings of Buddhism and then look at how Buddhism has been practiced in Tibet, Cambodia, Japan, and the US. As such, the course is also designed to promote logical thinking and broader perspectives. During the first half when we try to understand the basic teachings of this analytical religion, we will be mindful of how logic works. As we examine different Buddhist cultures in the latter half, we will focus on the differences in the cultural contexts on the one hand and the universal human needs that penetrate them on the other.



JAPANESE 197L Manga/Anime

After antagonizing much of the rest of the world in World War II, and then waging a struggle for economic supremacy in the 1980’s, Japan now finds itself in the curious position of being a phenomenally successful exporter of pop-culture.  The face of this wave of cultural exports has been manga (cartoons, comic books, and graphic novels) and anime (animation).  This course has three fundamental aims.  First, to give students tools to understand manga and anime on their own terms.   Second, to investigate the role manga and anime play in Japan.  Third, to examine the ways that manga and anime flow from one place to another and see what assumptions control or constrain that flow.  To that end, we will examine manga and anime in their various forms such as newspaper comics, serialized graphic novels, made-for-television animation, OVA (original video animation), and feature length cinematic animation.   




JAPANESE 246 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 120 and 126. Students will further develop basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing with an emphasis on the practical use of the Japanese language in various contexts. Textbook: Genki I (Lessons 9-12) & Genki II (Lessons 13-16). Prerequisite: Japanese 120 or 126. 6 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE 285 LANGUAGE SUITE CONVERSATION

The Thatcher Japanese Language House offers the opportunity to live in a residence hall dedicated to learning and exploring foreign cultures. Participants live together on a floor which includes a classroom/lounge, where they can socialize in the language. Also, they meet regularly during the week for a specially‐designed, two credit conversation/culture course. To qualify for the Japanese Language Program, you must have some proficiency in Japanese and a willingness to become more fluent. You must make a year’s commitment to the program; enroll in a 2 credit conversation/culture course each semester, taught on the floor; enroll concurrently in a 3‐credit departmental course; speak the language as much as possible on the floor. Email rap@acad.umass.edu for an application. 2 credits.



JAPANESE 327 INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 326. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at an intermediate level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion of cultural and contemporary issues. Textbook: Tobira. Prerequisite: Japanese 326. 6 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE Course# TBD MODERN JAPANESE POETRY

Scott Mehl

This course covers major works in modern Japanese lyric poetry, beginning with the earliest Meiji-era long-form poems and ending with Wago Ryoichi's poems on the disasters of March 11, 2011. We will pair the poems with critical essays that highlight crucial issues in modern poetics. All readings are available in English, although graduate students will have the opportunity to engage with the poems in the original.

JAPANESE 375 INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE LINGUISTICS

Introduction to the nature of Japanese phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Following a brief survey of basic linguistic concepts, the course focuses on the structure of modern Japanese, comparative linguistics, Japanese language acquisition, and controversial issues in Japanese linguistics. Prerequisite: Japanese 326.



JAPANESE 391T Tokyo through Literature and Film



JAPANESE 494SI SHINBUN: NEWSPAPERS AS MODERN CULTURE

Since the late 19th century newspapers have been a vital element in the shaping and dissemination of culture as well as news. Mass media in Japan are now entering a new phase shaped by the internet and attendant technologies. Major topics will include: technology transfer and its impact on culture; the role of mass media in script and education reform; nationalism, latent and overt; censorship and political involvement; the newspaper novel; coverage of sports and celebrities; reader presence on newspaper pages; the cultural and economic role of the newspaper publisher; and the debate about the place of print media in the internet era. We will also pay attention to comparative aspects, reading coverage of historic and contemporary events and topics in U.S. newspapers as well. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Japan majors.



JAPANESE 497C READINGS IN MODERN JAPANESE II

Longer readings from a selection of authentic modern Japanese literary materials, essays, and newspaper articles; also integratingreadings from textbook covered in Japanese 497D. Emphasis continues from Japanese 497A on readingcomprehension, kanji acquisition, and development of independence in grammatical and lexical analysis. Prerequisite: Japanese 497A or permission of instructor. 3 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE 497D CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 497B. Students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing at an intermediate-high level with an emphasis on natural communication in various contexts and discussion on cultural and contemporary issues. Further emphasis on oral fluency and development of compositional skills. Preparing students for working exclusively with authentic materials. Instruction and discussion are in Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 497B. 3 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE 498T TUTORIAL AND PRACTICUM

Non-native advanced students or native speakers of Japanese are assigned to work with one of the faculty and assist in teaching beginning or intermediate Japanese. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1-3 credits.




JAPANESE 498Y PRACTICUM

JAPANESE 499D HONORS THESIS SEMINAR: REBELS AND MARTYRS

This is the second half of the yearlong honors thesis seminar JAPANESE 499C/D. For a description of the first half, see under JAPANESE 499C. The spring half of the honors thesis seminar addresses issues of rebellion and martyrdom in Premodern and Modern Japan under the rubric of “sacrifice.” We will analyze primary and secondary literature as well as films on a variety of topics. For Premodern Japan, we will focus on human sacrifices in Noh drama, rebels following the Way of Tea, Japanese Christian martyrs, blood avengers, children as rebels and martyrs, peasant rebels, social rebels committing double suicide, and common folk calling the shots through religious world-renewal movements. For Modern Japan, we will explore the motivations of assassins in the late Tokugawa (Bakumatsu) and Meiji periods, of rebels in 20th-century feminist and proletarian movements, and of soldiers in the Pacific War.

JAPAN 499D fulfills the IE (Integrative Experience) requirement. No prerequisites. 4 credits

JAPANESE 537 ADVANCED MODERN JAPANESE II

A continuation of Japanese 532 and 536. Students will further develop skills in reading and analyzing quality Japanese texts, listening to conversations and debates, and expressing opinions clearly and logically in writing and in verbal discussions. As such, this course is designed to help students gain proficiency in academic situations. Prerequisite: Japanese 532/536. 3 credits. *Offered in Spring only.



JAPANESE 557 INTRODUCTION OF CLASSICAL JAPANESE II

Pre Requisite: Japanese 556

Students must enroll in JAPANESE 597A.

JAPANESE 556 (or 556K ) or permission of the Instructor


JAPANESE 570 INTRO JAPANESE REF& BIBLOGR



JAPANESE 591T S-Tokyo Through Lit & Film



JAPANESE 592 PROSEMINARS GRADUATE FACULTY

Various proseminars are offered by faculty as a requirement for the Master’s degree in Japanese, sometimes in parallel with existing undergraduate courses. Enrollment is open to graduate students only.



JAPANESE 593B S-INTRODUCTION TO JAPANESE LINGUISTICS

Introduction to the nature of Japanese phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Following a brief survey of basic linguistic concepts, the course focuses on the structure of modern Japanese, comparative linguistics, Japanese language acquisition, and controversial issues in Japanese linguistics.



JAPANESE 597A ST-MANUSCRIPT JAPANESE

A repeatable 1-credit course that may be taken in conjunction with both Japanese 556H and Japanese 557H. Designed as a critical supplement to the study of bungotai, this course introduces the script forms and orthography that most Japanese texts—whether manuscript, woodblock printed or moveable type—used prior to the twentieth century. Students will become familiar with the basic elements of that script system, from derivation and method to deciphering letters (fall semester) and reading complete texts (spring semester). Prerequisite: enrolment in/completion of J556 or knowledge of classical grammar.



JAPANESE 597C PROBLEMS AND METHODS IN TRANSLATION

Advanced training in practical techniques associated with the translation of modern Japanese; familiarization with appropriate glossaries, dictionaries, and other translator’s tools. Discussion of specific problems in Japanese-English translation and practice with a variety of prose styles used in journalistic, political, commercial, literary and other forms of modern writing. For undergraduate students only.



JAPANESE 660 PROBLEMS AND METHODS IN TRANSLATION

Advanced training in practical techniques associated with the translation of modern Japanese; familiarization with appropriate glossaries, dictionaries, and other translator’s tools. Discussion of specific problems in Japanese-English translation and practice with a variety of prose styles used in journalistic, political, commercial, literary and other forms of modern writing. For graduate students only.




Korean
ASIAN-ST 197C ST-Beginning Korean II

This course is the second part of the Beginning Korean sequence, which is designed to teach the fundamental skills to read, write, listen and speak in elementary level Korean. Prior to taking this course, students are expected to read Hangul and to be able to talk about simple daily activities and carry a limited conversation with memorized phrases. Compared to the first semester, more advanced vocabulary and grammar patterns will be introduced, and the students will learn how to integrate them into developed forms of application. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks successfully and will be able to ask a few formulaic questions. In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and activities will be used in class.



ASIAN-ST 297C ST-Intermediate Korean II

This course aims at the acquisition of language skills to read, write, listen, and speak in intermediate-level Korean. It is designed for students who have taken Intermediate Korean I (Asian-St 297B at UMass, KOR 201 at Smith, or Asian ST 262 at MHC) or proven to be at the equivalent level by the placement test. In addition to the textbook study in the classroom, audio-visual materials and class activities are employed by the instructor.



Asian Studies

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ASIAN-ST 491A SENIOR SEMINAR

Required of all students working toward the completion of the Certificate in Asian and Asian American Studies. Contact the Certificate Advisors for details. Professor C.N. Le in the Sociology Dept., in Thompson Hall or Professor James Hafner in the Geosciences Dept., in Morrill Science Center.



Printed on 11/8/2013



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