Chi4u essay Assignment



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CHI4U Essay Assignment

Answer Section
ESSAY
1. ANS:

Student’s answer might include such considerations as the sophisticated confederacy of the Iroquois peoples that required a high level of cooperation at the international level, the formal (if oral ) political constitution that governed the people, the political involvement of all the people ( indicating democracy) and the formal method of selecting a chief (political).

Student’s answer might also include the sophisticated trade network, the farming as well as hunting and gathering, the relatively comfortable standard of living (economic), the longhouse as the basis of social and political interaction, the importance of women in society and decisions, the respect for children, the profound spirituality and the development of leisure times and games (social).

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 30-36 OBJ: T/I | C

TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Communication
2. ANS:

Student’s answer might include such pieces of information as the involvement of women in society, the cooperation and mutually supportive societies, the firm and moral value system including concepts like sharing, respect, politeness and generosity, the development of leisure, time and games and art (social) , the intricate trade patterns that existed, the defined economic roles according to gender, the farming, fishing and hunting ( economic ), the international alliances and confederacies, the longhouses and decision making at local and national levels, the defined process of selecting a ruler and the responsibilities of the ruler and, the existence of democracy.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 64-84 OBJ: T/I | C

TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Communication


3. ANS:

Student’s answer might mention the material and selfish view of the environment, the inability to respect or live in harmony with other beings, the greed and exploitation demonstrated in trading, the presumptive notion of superiority in considering different values and beliefs, the criminal acts of abductions and murders that they engaged in or other offences committed during first contact.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate REF: pages 64-84 OBJ: T/I | C

TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Human Rights


4. ANS:

Student’s answer might mention the introduction of more developed technology (mirrors, cooking utensils, as an example) and the support against traditional enemies in the form of alliances and weapons as advantages and disease, warfare, loss of land and culture, alcohol, betrayal and near extermination as some of the disadvantages.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate REF: pages 64-84 OBJ: K/U | T/I

TOP: Communication | Colonial Canada


5. ANS:

Student’s answer with respect to motivation might include the notion of collectivity (sharing resources and production ), the respect and use of the resources (particularly game), the notion of being a part, rather than being master, of the environment and the concern for conservation rather than depletion.With respect to practices, the student might comment on the subsistence level of production for most of the peoples, the presence of trade and leisure time, demonstrating a slightly higher level of development in some societies, the clearly defined roles and responsibilities with respect to hunting, farming, fishing and food-gathering, the ability to store and preserve food, the effective and ingenious use of resources, the concept of an economic “safety-net” for those unable to provide for themselves and the respect for the environment that was a part of hunting and farming.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 64-84 OBJ: K/U | C

TOP: Culture and Identity | Aboriginal Peoples


6. ANS:

Student’s answer might include such circumstances as France’s involvement because of concern with competition from other European nations, the new and profitable demand for the beaver fur, the Church’s desire to convert the Aboriginals, Champlain’s cultivation of harmonious relations with the Aboriginal Peoples, the partnership with the Aboriginal Peoples ensuring their support during difficult times and the improved communication and connection to France because of improvements in navigation.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 90-109

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Colonial Canada


7. ANS:

Student’s answer might include such factors as the lack of diversified manufacture and farming, the focus on trade for export rather than the local market, the presence of Aboriginal Peoples, the harsh environment, and the added responsibility of the Church to convert as well as to tend to the settler’s spiritual needs.

PTS: 1 DIF: easy REF: pages 92-109

OBJ: T/I TOP: Communication | Colonial Canada


8. ANS:

Student’s answer would mention such factors as the increased population, the establishment of a viable settlement along the St. Lawrence, the effectiveness of the military presence with respect to both the Iroquois and the English, the development of a Canadian clergy and bureaucracy that maintained close ties with the mother country, the foundations of political, social and economic institutions in Canada and the continuing fur trade. The student’s answer might also mention that New France was still vastly inferior to the thirteen colonies in terms of population and that the Iroquois menace was still a daily dilemma for the settlers.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate REF: pages 112-134

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Colonial Canada


9. ANS:

Student’s answer would include such considerations as the patience demonstrated by the English, their forbearance when the Acadians refused to take the oath, the accepted rights of a victorious nation to establish conditions, the constant danger posed by the allies of the Acadians, and the on-going struggle with France and the desire of English settlers in New England and those coming to Atlantic Canada to have England deal with the Acadians.

Student’s answer might also include such considerations as the arbitrary manner of dealing with the Acadians, the reality that the Acadians had shown no inclination to support France or the Mi’kmaqs, the lack of consultation in reaching the decision, and the confiscation of property, the hardships, the suffering and the deaths that ensued.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 140-160

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Human Rights | Colonial Canada
10. ANS:

Student’s answer might mention such factors as the determination of the French Canadians who were fighting for their homes and survival, the assistance of the majority of Aboriginal warriors who were feared enemies, the effectiveness of the militia and the Aboriginal Peoples in guerilla fighting, and the early successes of the French in capturing key forts prior to the war (French advantages) as well as the overwhelming numerical superiority of the English colonists, the division in opinion harming the French strategy, the superior leadership demonstrated in strategy and battle, the commitment by England to waging the war in North America rather than Europe, and the naval superiority of England as demonstrated at Louisbourg (English advantages).

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 162-175

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Communication


11. ANS:

Student’s answer might mention his error in underestimating the value of the French-Canadian militia, despite the advice of both his aide-de-campe and the governor of New France, his ineffective use of France’s Aboriginal allies during the war, his miscalculation as to where the British would attack, his inability to integrate the diverse elements of his forces into a cohesive unit, and the swift retreat and defeat of his troops (as well as his death) at the battle of the Plains of Abraham.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate

REF: page 166 | page 167 | page 171 | page 172 | page 173 | page 174

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Colonial Canada | Interpretation and Analysis
12. ANS:

Student’s answer might include such observations as the influx of loyalists and the changes that ensued in identity, geography, and political institutions. Student’s answer might also point out that the loss by Britain transferred the Ohio Valley and the heart of the continent from Canada to the United States. The answer might also mention the retention of the French Canadians despite the participation of France as an ally of the United States.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate REF: pages 196-203

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Transformation of Canadian Identity | Interpretation and Analysis


13. ANS:

Student’s answer would demonstrate the losses experienced by the other three participants. The Aboriginal Peoples lost their great leader, Tecumseh, and more importantly, the last opportunity to secure land rights in North America and to create Aboriginal Nations in the West. Their diminished status was demonstrated by their non-involvement at the peace talks, despite promises and indications by England.

The Americans had their capital burnt, lost virtually all the battles fought in Canada, despite outnumbering Canadians 7 000 000 to 500 000 and failed in their stated objective of taking Upper Canada.

The English were excluded from the West, were drawn to a stalemate by a fledgling nation that did not have the army or the navy that England possessed and were forced to spend money to strengthen the colonial defences.

The Canadians, on the other hand, won virtually all their battles, prevented the stated American aim of conquest, saw the French Canadians join physically in the resistance to the United States, which was to become a theme in Canadian history, saw the arrest of the Americanization of Upper Canada and witnessed the birth of an English Canadian identity.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult

REF: page 208 | page 209 | page 210 | page 211 | page 212 OBJ: C | T/I

TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Transformation of Canadian Identity


14. ANS:

Student’s answer would include such differences as the racial cleavage that dominated events in Lower Canada, the influence of the United States on the reform movement in Upper Canada, the division within the reform movement that existed in Upper Canada as opposed to the unity behind Papineau in Lower Canada, the different issues (education and Anglican Church influence as opposed to control of revenue), and the differences between Mackenzie and Papineau.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult

REF: page 212 | page 213 | page 214 | page 215 | page 216 OBJ: T/I | K/U

TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Communication
15. ANS:

Student’s answer would explain the motives of such reform movements as the temperance and Evangelical responses to changes in society. Student’s answer would describe the conditions that needed attention and reform such as the cholera epidemic, the elitist educational system, the proliferation of alcohol, and the damage to family that it incurred, the charitable organizations responding to the need for warmer clothes, the influx of immigrants, and the slaves seeking refuge in Canada.

Student’s answer might suggest altruistic motives by showing that the reformers did not need the changes for themselves or their families, but rather, were responding to a call to their consciences through such clarions as Methodism.

Student’s answer might also suggest selfishness was the driving force by mentioning that Strachan and his followers used the rejection of America to install themselves as the Family Compact, that British officials wanted to bolster social forces to preserve the British connection and that the upper class regarded the immigrants as a cheap labour pool.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 230-239

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Social Programs and Policies


16. ANS:

Student’s answer would outline the development of a distinctively French-Canadian perspective expressed by Garneau in his Histoire du Canada. This work emphasizes the achievements of the average French Canadian and glorifies the exploits of the French Canadian heroes like Champlain who faced tremendous challenges.It glorifies the French Canadian personality (“loftier character or more holy nature”). The newspaper Le Canadien also emphasized the unique features of Quebec (“our religion, our language, and our laws”)

Student’s answer would outline the pioneer community of Upper Canada as portrayed by the Strickland sisters and demonstrate that this added to the myth of a courageous people facing daunting odds, yet forging a new society in the face of adversity. The Canadian identity also emerges in such works as Wacousta.

Student’s answer would mention the enduring image of Sam Slick, a product of the Maritimes literary culture.The newspaper articles that were intended to elevate Canadians and the Stepsure Letters represent a long-standing literary tradition in Canada of humour and satire.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult

REF: page 240 | page 241 | page 242 | page 244 | page 243 | page 245

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Culture and Identity | French Canadian Identity
17. ANS:

Student’s answer would consider such external factors as Britain’s desire to lessen her involvement in North America, her adoption of free trade and her implementation of responsible government as well as such internal considerations as the Baldwin-LaFontaine alliance, the struggles with the governors and the passage of the Rebellion Losses Bill.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 250-257

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Interpretation and Analysis | Transformation of Canadian Identity


18. ANS:

Student’s answer would outline such developments as England’s adoption of free trade and the subsequent need for the colonies to be more economically interdependent, the British desire to lessen her involvement in North America, the crucial role of the governors in facilitating talks of union, particularly in persuading recalcitrant Maritime colonies to join the endeavour and the role of England in hosting the last conference prior to Confederation and passing the necessary legislation.

Student’s answer would then outline the impact of the Civil War and the deterioration of relations between Canada and the United States. Such events or episodes as the Trent affair, St. Alban’s raid and American talk of annexation might be mentioned as well as the Fenian threat.

PTS: 1 DIF: difficult REF: pages 257-268

OBJ: T/I | C TOP: Transformation of Canadian Identity | Interpretation and Analysis
19. ANS:

Student’s answer would explain how representatives met at Charlottetown and agreed to abandon Maritime Union for the broader possibility of union of all the British North American colonies. Student’s answer might also note that the advantages of union were summarized and presented to delegates from all colonies and that these advantages were publicized for all colonial peoples.

Student’s answer would explain that at Quebec, the actual terms of the union were agreed upon, with the constitution of Canada essentially created. Also, this conference established a procedure for ratification of the terms and spoke of the possibility of a transcontinental railway.

Student’s answer would indicate that London represented the final step in the process, with the presence of British involvement and the formal ratification of the terms agreed upon in Quebec.

PTS: 1 DIF: moderate

REF: page 263 | page 264 | page 265 | page 266 | page 267 | page 268



OBJ: K/U | C TOP: Communication | Transformation of Canadian Identity
Directory: ~jleatch -> CHI4U


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