Chapter 3 Federalism: Forging a Nation Chapter Outline



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Chapter 3

Federalism: Forging a Nation

Chapter Outline
I. Federalism: National and State Sovereignty

A. The Argument for Federalism

1. Protecting Liberty

2. Moderating the Power of Government

B. The Powers of the Nation and States

1. Enumerated Powers and the Supremacy Clause

2. Implied Powers: The Necessary and Proper Clause

3. Reserved Powers: The States’ Authority

II. Federalism in Historical Perspective

A. An Indestructible Union (1789-1865)

1. The Nationalist View: McCulloch v. Maryland

2. The States’ Rights View: The Dred Scott Decision

B. Dual Federalism and Laissez-Faire Capitalism (1865-1937)

1. The Fourteenth Amendment and State Discretion

2. Judicial Protection of Business

3. National Authority Prevails

III. Contemporary Federalism (Since 1937)

A. Interdependency and Intergovernmental Relations

B. Government Revenues and Intergovernmental Relations

1. Fiscal Federalism

2. Categorical and Block Grants

C. Devolution

1. The Republican Revolution

2. The Supreme Court’s Contribution to Devolution

3. Nationalization, the More Powerful Force

IV. The Public’s Influence: Setting the Boundaries of Federal-State Power




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