Calvert County Public Schools Instructional Lesson Plan English Language Arts



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Calvert County Public Schools

Instructional Lesson Plan

English Language Arts


Grade: 4 Unit Title: Introduction to Greek Mythology Length: 3-6 days



Lesson Overview:

  • Students will be introduced to Greek Mythology

  • Students will explore different gods, goddesses, and heroes as they explore different myths through a variety of print/non-print resources

  • Students will analyze the characteristics of a Greek hero

Essential Question:

  • What is Greek Mythology?

  • What are the many facets of heroism in Greek myths?

Essential Understanding: (Student Outcomes)

  • Students will explore gods, goddesses & heroes in Greek Mythology

  • Students will make inferences and draw conclusions about characteristics Greeks admired in heroes

CCSS Grade Level Standards Applicable to Lesson

RL.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL.4.3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

RL.4.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

RL.4.9 Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

W.4.9a Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).

SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.


Materials:

Student copies of Greek Mythology Heroes graphic organizer

Online access to websites and databases


  • http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/worldhistory/greekgods/ (BrainPop Video Introducting Mythology)

  • http://www.abc.net.au/arts/wingedsandals/storytime1.htm (Perseus and Medusa video)

  • http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/frontpage (SIRS Discoverer)

  • http://mythweb.com/heroes/heroes.html (Website)

  • http://www.worldbookonline.com/kids/home (Online Reference Database)

  • http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/home (Online Reference Database, World Book)

  • http://www.school.eb.com (Online Reference Database, Britannica)

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RYGQQ_qybY (Trojan Horse Video)

  • http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/trading_cards_2/ (Trading Card)

Print resources from media center (Use Destiny to pull books). Some examples are:



  • Perseus the Prophecy in the book Greek Gods and Heroes by Alice Low

  • Perseus and the Gorgon’s Head in comic-strip format, Greek Myths for Young Children by Marcia Williams

  • The Trojan Horse by Catherine Storr

  • The Wooden Horse in the book Greek Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean

  • The Trojan Horse attachment from Greek Mythology Unit by Nichole Shelby




Teacher Planning and Preparation:

  • Read entire lesson plan before starting

  • Decide which lesson path you will take regarding Day 3

  • Collect a variety of print/non-print digital resources

  • Provide any graphic organizers to support thinking and learning

  • Provide age appropriate myths/text

  • Organize students in differentiated cooperative groups

  • Provide computer access to students

  • Provide assistive technology (text to speech, recording devices, concept maps, etc)

Lesson Pre- Assessment:

  • Show an image or watch a short video of Superman and ask students what they know about this character

  • Ask students if Superman possesses qualities/characteristics of being a hero. (You should receive responses like selfless, smart, loyal, and courageous, however, you may get responses about him having super-human power, super speed, x-ray vision, etc.) Guide students to discuss the characteristics of heroism they analyzed during their Shiloh Unit.

  • For further discussion, ask students when they think of the word “hero,” what else comes to mind (Flash Gordon, policeman, teacher, parent, or pet)? Who would they consider being their hero and what characteristics does he or she possess?




Lesson Procedure:
Day 1:

  • Before jumping into Greek Mythology, ask students what they know about myths/mythology

  • Create a web on the SMART Board or chart paper with myths/mythology written in the center

  • Allow students to discuss in small groups what they believe are the key points or examples of mythology and chart their answers (Gods, goddesses, heroes, deities, powerful, immortal, Mt. Olympus, Olympians, ruler, natural phenomena, fiction, Percy Jackson, etc. )

  • Explain to students that they will be introduced to gods, goddesses, and heroes as they explore Greek Mythology. View an introduction to Greek mythology using Brain Pop, Greek Gods at http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/worldhistory/greekgods/ (Not all schools have Brain Pop Subscriptions)

    • Review Greek Mythology with students (ology = study of)

    • Allow students to add on to the web

    • Have students create their own definition of Greek Mythology


Day 2:

  • Teacher will introduce 1-3 different Greek heroes: Perseus, Odysseus (Ulysses), and/or Heracles (Hercules)

    • Pass out the Greek Mythology Heroes graphic organizer so as students research these different heroes, they can take notes. Review questions before introducing first Greek hero.




  • Teacher will first introduce Perseus using a video and/or text.

    • View Perseus and Medusa video at http://www.abc.net.au/arts/wingedsandals/storytime1.htm

    • Perseus and Medusa attachment from the Greek Mythology Unit by Nichole Shelby

      • Other example resources that can be used are:

Print:

        • Perseus the Prophecy in the book Greek Gods and Heroes by Alice Low

        • Perseus and the Gorgon’s Head in comic-strip format, Greek Myths for Young Children by Marcia Williams

Non-Print:

  • SIRS Discoverer at http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/frontpage

  • Perseus and the Gorgon Medusa online at http://mythweb.com/heroes/perseus/index.html

  • World Book Online at http://www.worldbookonline.com/kids/home or http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/home

  • Britannica School online at http://www.school.eb.com



  • Teacher will model the first two questions for students as he/she pulls information from the video/text.

  • Teacher will help guide students as they work cooperatively in small groups to fill out the rest of their graphic organizer.

  • Teacher and students will review answers and discuss any inferences/questions they may have.

  • Teacher will collect Greek Mythology Heroes graphic Organizer


Note: If you feel another Greek hero needs to be modeled, another example could be:

Heracles (Hercules):

Print:

      • Heracles The Hero Who Became Immortal in the book Treasury of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters by Donna Jo Napoli

      • The Twelve Tasks of Heracles in comic-strip format, Greek Myths for Young Children by Marcia Williams

      • The Twelve Labors of Heracles attachment from Greek Mythology Unit by Nichole Shelby

Non-Print:

  • Hercules online at http://mythweb.com/hercules/herc01.html (I had a parent complain about the “killing of children” and in Labor 8 “Heracles pacified the beasts by feeding them their own master. In another, they satisfied their appetites on the hero's squire, a young man named Abderus.”

  • The Labors of Hercules online at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/Herakles/labors.html (Please be cautious of the images in this site. Specifically, the LIONS and the Apples of the Hesperides tab have images that are not appropriate and you should NOT use. However, the main page listed is fine.)







Note: DAY 3 HAS TWO DIFFERENT LESSON PROCEDURES. IT’S UP TO THE LMS TO DECIDE WHAT WILL WORK BEST FOR THE ELA TEACHERS AND FOR THEIR STUDENTS.


Day 3:

  • Pass out the Greek Mythology Heroes Chart

  • Teacher will introduce Odysseus (Ulysses).

  • Show The Trojan Horse video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RYGQQ_qybY (uses Roman name Ulysses)

  • Students will be given a choice to work in pairs, small groups of 3-4, or independently to research Odysseus/Ulysses.

  • Students will research as they rotate through different print/non-print sources. Other example resources that can be used are:

Print:

      • The Trojan Horse by Catherine Storr

      • The Wooden Horse in the book Greek Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean

      • The Trojan Horse attachment from Greek Mythology Unit by Nichole Shelby

Non-Print:

  • Odysseus at http://mythweb.com/odyssey/index.html

  • World Book Online at http://www.worldbookonline.com/kids/home

or http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/home

  • Britannica School online at http://www.school.eb.com




  • Teacher and students will review answers and discuss any inferences/conclusions/questions they may have.

OR

  • Pass out the Greek Mythology Heroes Chart

  • Students will be given a choice to work in pairs, small groups of 3-4, or independently to research their Greek hero (All students must fill out their own graphic organizer even if they work in pairs/small groups)

  • Students will pick a Greek Hero name out of a hat (For example: Jason, Bellerophon, Theseus, Achilles, Hercales, etc.) (Advising that teachers carefully examine all materials being recommended for use with each Greek Hero choice in order to monitor content of material for appropriateness.)

  • Students will research as they rotate through different print/non-print sources. Other example resources that can be used are:

Print:

      • Greek Myths by Ann Turnbull

      • Greek Myths for Young Children by Marcia Williams

      • Greek Gods and Heroes by Alice Low

      • Treasury of Greek Mythology by DonnaJo Napoli

      • The Adventures of Ulysses by Anna Claybourne

      • Attachments from Greek Mythology Unit by Nichole Shelby

Non-Print:

  • Greek Heroes http://mythweb.com/heroes/heroes.html

  • World Book Online at http://www.worldbookonline.com/kids/home

  • or http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/home

  • Britannica School online at http://www.school.eb.com

  • SIRS online at http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/frontpage

  • http://www.classicsunveiled.com/mythnet/html/grehero.html

Teacher will review answers and discuss any inferences/conclusions/questions students may have.


Day 4:

  • Teacher will introduce ReadWriteThink’s Trading Card Creator at http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/trading_cards_2/ (or use Pixie)

  • Students will use their graphic organizer and print/non-print resources to create their Greek Hero trading card.

  • When finished, print trading card out and have students draw a picture of their Greek Hero.If you decide to let students insert a graphic from Google, it may be best to select a few images to link to the Destiny Home Page to avoid encounters with inappropriate images for elementary students. Once the student selected the image, it had to be saved to “Pictures” before it could be used on the trading card. Maybe there is a better way to do this but I did not know about.

  • Allow students to share their trading cards. Have them discuss any differences/similarities in the hero’s characteristics. Discussions should include if they agree/disagree, why is one character more heroic than the other, etc.

  • Students can also share their trading cards with their ELA teacher during their Greek Mythology Unit.


Extension:

Some different lesson ideas to extend Greek Mythology Introduction:



Compare/Contrast Activity

  • Print out the article or read aloud “Superman and Hercules” from SIRS http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/article?urn=urn%3Asirs%3AUS%3BARTICLE%3BART%3B0000309277 (There is a compare and contrast activity, however, the article lists answers at the end)

  • Have students compare and contrast Superman and Hercules or you can decide to have students choose their own super hero vs. Greek god/goddess/hero

    • Use the Venn Diagram information/text at http://printables.scholastic.com/printables/detail/?id=41270&query=superman+and+hercules+compare+and+contrast+essay&N=0&Ntk=printables_minibooks&Ntt=superman+and+hercules+compare+and+contrast+essay&_fq=fff&No=0&spellcheck=false


Letter Generator

  • Research other beings that students may consider to be heroes

  • For example: Christopher Reeves, an actor who played the part, Superman, who unfortunately had a paralyzing accident. Students can view different articles, videos, interviews and discuss whether or not he was considered a modern day hero.

  • You can use and modify this lesson at ReadWriteThink to fit your students’ needs

    • http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/activities-projects/celebrate-heroes-30154.html?main-tab=1#tabs

    • Students can use the interactive Letter Generator and notes to write a letter to his or her hero. This letter can explain why the child thinks the person is a hero and how he or she hopes to be like that person.




Lesson Post-Assessment:

Students will use ReadWriteThink’s Web 2.0 tool to create a Greek Mythology Hero Trading Card.



Lesson Closure:

Students review their definition of Greek Mythology and discuss all the elements. Students will think about how Greek Heroes came to be and discuss if the Greek heroes are truly heroes in their eyes.







Calvert County Public Schools Draft Lesson Plan Template



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