California State Service Delivery Plan for the Migrant Education Program September 2010 California Department of Education Sacramento table of contents a message



Download 1.01 Mb.
Page1/8
Date02.06.2016
Size1.01 Mb.
#78585
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8



California State Service Delivery Plan for the

Migrant Education Program
September 2010

California Department of Education

Sacramento

TABLE OF CONTENTS


A MESSAGE FROM THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS iii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY vii
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 1
OVERVIEW OF THE REPORT AND ITS DEVELOPMENT

MIGRANT STUDENTS IN CALIFORNIA

LEGISLATIVE MANDATES

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP


CHAPTER 2: STATE SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN 5
COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT

STATE SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN COMPONENTS

SCHOOL READINESS ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS MATHEMATICS

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

HEALTH

OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH



PARENT INVOLVEMENT

IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
CHAPTER 3: EVALUATION PLAN 43
APPENDIX A: “A-G” ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 48
APPENDIX B: STANDARDIZED TESTING AND REPORTING PROGRAM 50
APPENDIX C: TITLE III ACCOUNTABILITY 51
APPENDIX D: OVERVIEW OF THE CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAMINATION 56
APPENDIX E: QUALITY INDICATORS AND BEST PRACTICES FOR SUMMER AND 57
OUT-OF- SCHOOL TIME PROGRAMS

APPENDIX F: FEDERAL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS 59
APPENDIX G: QUALITY INDICATORS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS PROGRAMS 61
GLOSSARY 63
SELECTED REFERENCES 67

History will judge societies and governments — and their institutions — not by how big they are or how well they serve the rich and the powerful, but by how effectively they respond to the



needs of the poor and the helpless.”

-- Cesar Chavez

A Message from the State Superintendent of Public Instruction
I am pleased to present the 2009-2014 California State Service Delivery Plan for Migrant Education, a plan that will provide essential guidance for Migrant Education regional and district programs in helping our migrant students reach the academic standards we have set for all students in California.
California is home to over 200,000 migrant students, the largest migrant student population of any state in the country. Migrant parents work in our agricultural fields and forests across the state, moving with the harvests throughout the year. The largest group of migrant families moves between California and Mexico, but families also move within California and between California and other states.
The Migrant Education Program is funded by Title I, Part C, with the mission of providing supplementary services to ensure that migrant children meet the same challenging academic standards that all children are expected to meet. The Migrant Education Program in California has provided a wealth of services to migrant students since 1968, including home and center- based preschool programs, emergency medical and dental services, referrals to health care providers, tutoring and extended instructional time, comprehensive summer school, and support for out of school youth. Services such as these have been essential in preparing and supporting migrant students to be successful in school. Nevertheless, a significant achievement gap

persists between migrant and non-migrant students in California, and this State Service Delivery

Plan is designed to close that gap.
The development of the State Service Delivery Plan for Migrant Education involved stakeholders from every part of the program. I would like to thank the parents, staff, and directors in the Migrant Education Program, researchers and practitioners in the content areas, and consultants from the California Department of Education who gave generously of their time and resources to complete this Plan. These participants reviewed the findings of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment for the California Migrant Education Program, analyzed data and consulted researchers in seven areas of migrant education: English Language Arts, Mathematics, graduation from High School, School Readiness, Health, Out of School Youth, and Parent Involvement.
The State Service Delivery Plan for Migrant Education will serve as the guidance document for program planning and development, monitoring and evaluation of the Migrant Education Program for the next several years. It shares the goals of the California Department of

Education for all students in the core content areas, and provides measurable outcomes that will help target and prioritize resources most effectively. The Plan also outlines strategies to address the needs of migrant students that often create obstacles to academic achievement. It is my hope that this Plan will serve as a useful and practical tool for educators at all levels for improving education for some of our neediest students in California.

JACK O’CONNELL

State Superintendent of Public Instruction



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Migrant, Indian, and International Education Office of the California Department of Education (CDE) is grateful to all of the participants who gave so selflessly of their time and talents to create this plan. Appreciation is extended to members of the State Plan Task Force and Management Team.
Members of the Management Team provided leadership for the entire project:
Deborah Abello, Director, Migrant Education Program, Region 1

Margit Birge, Facilitator and Editor, California Comprehensive Center at WestEd

Ruben Castillo, Director, Migrant Education Program, Region 4

Suzanne Falzone, Facilitator and Consultant, Learning Designs

Ada Hand, Early Childhood Education Consultant

Linda Rivera, Consultant, Migrant, Indian, and International Education Office, CDE

Peggie Rodriquez, Consultant, WestEd

Olivia Sosa, Project Lead and Director, Migrant Education Program, Region 23

David Sul, Evaluator, Senior Partner, Sul & Associates

Armando Tafoya, Research Associate, Evaluation Research Program, WestEd

Sharon Wieland, Principal Writer, Wieland Consulting
The core of the work was accomplished by members of the seven work groups:
School Readiness
Lily Gorban, Preschool Program Specialist, Migrant Education, Region 9

Jack Hailey, Consultant, California State Senate

Ada Hand, Work Group Lead, Early Childhood Education Consultant

Yolanda Mendoza, Early Education Specialist Migrant Education, Region 2

Julio Mora, Parent, Migrant Education Region 18

Mary Anne Riehl-Campos, Consultant, First Five California

E. Sheli Silva, Director, Migrant Education, Region 8

Adriana Simmons, Work Group Co-Lead, Director, Migrant Education Even Start

Maria Torres, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 11

Maria Trejo, Administrator, Even Start Office, CDE

Marie Vitoria, Elementary Services Specialist, Merced County Office of Education
English-Language Arts
Maria Alvarez, Instructional Services Coordinator, Migrant Education Region 3

Rachel Ehlers, Senior Analyst, Legislative Analyst’s Office, State Legislature

Beatriz Esqueda, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 7

Claudia Lockwood, Director, San Joaquin County Office of Education

Chris McIntire, Principal, McKinley Primary School, Gridley

Olivia Sosa, Work Group Lead, Director, Migrant Education Region 23

Soledad Ruiz, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 17

Lilia Sanchez, Consultant, Language Policy and Leadership Office, CDE

Lorena Tariba, Coordinator, Gilroy Unified School District, Gilroy, California
Mathematics
Rosa Alejandre, Instructional Services Coordinator, Migrant Education, Region 3

Margit Birge, Facilitator and Consultant, California Comprehensive Center at WestEd

Angelica Estrella, Mathematics Teacher, Andrew Hill High School

Robert Forbes, Director, Migrant Education, Region 24

Hortencia Garcia, 7th Grade Pre-Algebra Teacher, Manteca Unified School District

Francisca Hernandez, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 5

Kathleen Latimer, Education Programs Consultant, Mathematics/Science Leadership Office, CDE

Bertha Ochoa, Mathematics Teacher, Wilson Jr. High, El Centro, California Julio Pardo, Coordinator, Valdes Math Institute, Evergreen Valley College David Sul, Work Group Lead, Evaluator, Sul and Associates, Tracy, California Elizabeth Valdez, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 6

Manuel Jauregui, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 3
High School Graduation
Deborah Abello, Work Group Lead, Director, Migrant Education Program, Region 1

Susanna Cooper, Principal Consultant, Office of State Senator Darrell Steinberg

Dolores Coronado, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 1

Jacinta Flores, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 12

David Kopperud, Counseling, Student Support and Service Learning Office, CDE Suny de Leon, Program Coordinator, California State University Sacramento Anthony J. Martinez, Director, Antelope Valley Union High School District

Margaret Salazar-Huerta, Director II, Migrant Education, Region 23

Armando Tafoya, Project Evaluator and Research Associate, WestEd
Health
Rosario Alberro, Associate Director, California-Mexico Health Initiative, UC Berkeley

Monica Cano, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 16

Ruben Castillo, Work Group Lead, Director, Migrant Education Program, Region 4

Maria Chavez, Director, Migrant Education, Region 9

Sandi Goldstein, Director, California Adolescent Health Collaborative

Javier Hernandez, Senior Special Programs Assistant, Migrant Education, Region 10

Holly Pauls, Healthy Start Director, River Delta Unified School District

Adriana Paulson, Specialist, Migrant Education, Region 9

Angelica Rosales, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 4

Salvador Vazquez, Specialist, Migrant Education, Region 3

Out-of-School Youth
Rosa Coronado, Director, Migrant Education, Region 16

Ofelia Gamez, Director, College Assistance Migrant Program, Fresno

Sofia Gutierrez, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 7

Ruben Patron, Director, Migrant Education, Region 3

Ruben Piña, Program Specialist, Merced County Office of Education

Peggie Rodriguez, Work Group Lead, Consultant, WestEd

Marcos Sanchez, Consultant, CDE

Nicolas Uicab, Parent, Migrant Education, Region 1
Parent Involvement
Santiago Avila-Gomez, Attorney, California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. Joanna Basulto, Attorney, California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc.

Monica Cano, Secretary, State Parent Advisory Council, Region 16

Ruben Castillo, Migrant Director, Region 4

Lisceth Cruz, Ph.D. Student

Jerry Cummings, Consultant, Title I Accountability and Partnerships Office, CDE

Dolores Coronado, Vice President, State Parent Advisory Council, Region 1

Carol Dickson, Consultant, Title I Accountability and Partnerships Office, CDE

Maria Martinez, Interpreter and Translator, Region 4

Maria Mendez, Treasurer, State Parent Advisory Council, Region 3

Maria Medina, President, State Parent Advisory Council, Region 4

Jose Pineda, Sargent of Arms, State Parent Advisory Council, Region 5

Maricela Ramirez, Consultant, CDE

Ignacio Rojas, Facilitator and Program Coordinator, Los Angeles County Office of Education

Faris M. Sabbah, Migrant Director, Region 11

Josefina Viramontes, Parent Education Specialist, Los Angeles County Office of Education
We would like to extend special appreciation to the researchers and scholars who gathered data and prepared presentations for the work groups:
Bonnie Benard, Senior Program Associate, WestEd

Margaret Gibson, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Anthropology, UC Santa Cruz

Laura Hill, Ph.D., Research Fellow, Public Policy Institute of California Virginia Mann, Ph.D., Professor of Cognitive Sciences, UC Irvine JoAnne D. Martin, Researcher, Parent Teacher Association

Eduardo Mosqueda, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education, UC Santa Cruz

Miguel Perez, Ph.D., Professor of Health Science, California State University, Fresno

John Shefelbine, Ph.D., Teacher Education, California State University, Sacramento
We would like to recognize and thank the migrant students from Migrant Education–Region 23 who gave their time and shared their personal stories:
Abel Afaiza Juventian Rocha Armando Gomez Aldama Marisol Ruiz Karla Ceja Michele Villada Dulce Martinez Oscar Zamora
A special appreciation to the translators and interpreters who made it possible for everyone to be included in the conversation:
Josefina Aguilar, San Joaquin County Office of Education Sylvia Bello, San Joaquin County Office of Education María Martinez, Fresno County Office of Education

Ruby Parra, Santa Clara County Office of Education
The Administrative Assistants who provided essential technical, administrative, and fiscal support:
Laura Chavarria, San Joaquin County Office of Education

Rita Contreras, Fresno County Office of Education
CDE Administrators provided administrative oversight for developing and completing the plan:
Deborah V.H. Sigman, Deputy Superintendent, Curriculum, Learning, and Accountability

Branch


Anthony Monreal, former Deputy Superintendent, Curriculum, and Instruction

Phil Lafontaine, Director, English Learner and Curriculum Support Division Hector Rico, former Director, Language Learner and Curriculum Support Division Brian Centeno, Administrator, Migrant, Indian, and International Education Office

Gloria Guzmán-Walker, Interim Administrator, Migrant, Indian, and International Education

Office


Ernesto Ruiz, former Administrator, Migrant, Indian, and International Education Office

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The State Service Delivery Plan (SSDP) is mandated by federal law for all migrant programs, and it marks an important step forward in meeting the needs of migrant students in California. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), outlines the minimum requirements for the plan’s content, and California’s plan includes additional sections. The Plan provides guidance for the work of the Migrant Education Program (MEP) in California for the next five years, as the program works on supporting migrant students to achieve high academic standards and closing the achievement gap between migrant and non-migrant students.
California is home to over 200,000 migrant students, the largest migrant student population of any state in the country. One out of every three migrant students in the U.S. lives in California. Migrant families in California work primarily in agriculture, and they move frequently in order to remain employed. The biggest group of workers moves between California and Mexico. Migrant students face many economic, social, and educational challenges. However, they also gain knowledge and skills from their experiences. With sufficient and appropriate support, these experiences can serve as a foundation for success in school.
The purpose of the SSDP is to guide the MEP in planning and service delivery, at the state, regional, and local levels. MEP services are supplemental to those provided by school districts and local schools, and range from preschool programs to academic home visits, extended day and summer school classes, and health referrals, among other activities. The foundation of the SSDP is the Migrant Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA), which was completed in 2007. The SSDP Task Force analyzed achievement and other data, interviewed experts and researchers, and involved migrant staff, students, and parents to develop the components of this plan.
The SSDP addresses seven areas:
1. School Readiness

2. English-Language Arts

3. Mathematics

4. High School Graduation

5. Health

6. Out-of-School Youth

7. Parent Involvement
In each area, the SSDP identifies a performance target, two or three measurable outcomes, indicators, strategies, and topics for parent training and for professional development of migrant staff. The performance targets and measurable outcomes will support California’s efforts to close the achievement gap. The targets and measurable outcomes are aligned with the federal ESEA targets and with California’s annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAO’s) for English learners.
The implementation of the SSDP is based on a cycle of continuous improvement. By federal law, the MEP must provide services first to Priority for Service students, defined as those whose education has been interrupted due to mobility and who are at risk of failing. Interventions for students are designed to work with the Response to Instruction and Intervention (RtI2) model supported by the California Department of Education.

The SSDP also identifies a set of statewide strategies and other recommended strategies. The Migrant regions are expected to implement programs and services aligned with the statewide strategies. As funding permits, the CDE encourages regions to consider the other recommended strategies in their service delivery.


The MEP will monitor progress towards achieving the measurable outcomes at the district, regional and state levels. An external evaluator will conduct formative and summative evaluation of migrant programs and services statewide over the next three to five years.

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND
The State Service Delivery Plan (SSDP) is mandated by federal law and marks an important step forward in meeting the needs of migrant students in California. The Plan provides guidance for the work of the Migrant Education Program (MEP) in California for the next five years, as the program works on supporting migrant students to achieve high academic standards.
The SSDP serves five purposes:
 Guide the state’s 23 migrant regions in program planning and service delivery in accordance with California’s statewide goals for all students.
 Provide a statewide guide in closing the achievement gap that exists between migrant children and non-migrant children.
 Identify strategies and interventions for reaching program goals.
 Set out an evaluation plan to implement the SSDP.
 Fulfill the requirements of the ESEA, Title I, Part C.


OVERVIEW OF THE REPORT AND ITS DEVELOPMENT
Chapter One describes the development of the SSDP as well as background information about migrant students in California, the legislative mandates guiding the MEP, and the current initiative to close the achievement gap in California. Chapter Two describes the comprehensive needs assessment, the SSDP’s seven components, implementation of the SSDP, and plans for professional development. Chapter Three describes the evaluation plan. Appendixes and a glossary of terms are found at the end of the report.
The process of developing the SSDP was led by a management team and involved a 60- member task force in addition to researchers, interpreters, and support staff. The task force initially formed six work groups, one for each component of the Plan, which met over a two-year period. A seventh work group was subsequently formed on the topic of parent involvement.
The work groups met in person and online; they discussed research in their content areas; gathered data on migrant students from the Migrant Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) as well as other sources; analyzed student achievement data of migrant, Hispanic, and English learner students; and gathered input from experts and practitioners working with migrant students and English learners. A panel of migrant students contributed their experiences and provided insights into the needs of migrant students. Each work group also met with a distinguished researcher currently working in their subject area.
The work groups gathered information and agreed on one performance target and two or three measurable outcomes for their component. Then each group prioritized the strategies that met agreed-upon criteria for inclusion in the plan, and identified other elements for their component, including topics for parent training and professional development for migrant staff.

MIGRANT STUDENTS IN CALIFORNIA
California is home to over 200,000 migrant students, the largest migrant student population of any state in the country. One out of every three migrant students in the U.S. lives in California. Migrant workers in California move frequently in order to remain employed, primarily in agriculture. The largest group of migrant families moves between California and Mexico; families also move within California and between California and other states.1 Most migrant workers in California are Latino, primarily from Mexico, and some are from other Central American countries. A small number of migrant workers represent other ethnic groups, such as Hmong.2 MEP staff report that many Latino migrant workers do not speak English well or at all, and some do not speak Spanish either. Some migrant farm workers speak only an indigenous language that prevents oral communication, even with other workers.
Most migrant workers toil long hours and earn low wages that frequently place them below the U. S. poverty line.3 Migrant children often face the challenges of having parents working long and unpredictable working hours; making frequent moves; lacking transportation, and living in oppressive, sub-standard housing conditions.4 Although migrant families may qualify for social services or financial aid, MEP staff report that they may not seek assistance. In spite of these conditions, children of migrant workers come to school with many assets upon which their academic education can be built.



Download 1.01 Mb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2022
send message

    Main page