Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana a drop Around the World Recommended for Grade 2



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Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana A Drop Around the World Recommended for Grade 2


Title/Author: A Drop Around the World

Suggested Time to Spend: 8 Days (eight 30-minute sessions)

Common Core grade-level ELA/Literacy Standards: RI.2.1, RI.2.2, RI.2.3, RI.2.4, RI.2.5, RI.2.6, RI.2.7; W.2.2, W.2.8; SL 2.1; L.2.1, L.2.2, L.2.4

Lesson Objective:

Students will use literacy skills to able to understand how the water moves through the water cycle as it goes around the world.


Teacher Instructions

Before the Lesson

  1. Read the Big Ideas and Key Understandings and the Synopsis below. Please do not read this to the students. This is a description to help you prepare to teach the book and be clear about what you want your children to take away from the work.

Big Ideas/Key Understandings/Focusing Question

Students will understand the importance of the water cycle and how water changes as it flows throughout the world.

Focusing Question – What changes happen to a drop of water over time?

Synopsis

This text is about what happens to a single drop of water over time. The drop of water travels from the coast of Maine, across Europe, Africa, Asia and back to the United States. During its travels, the drop of water goes through the various stages of the water cycle. The rich language and vivid vocabulary make this book complex and interesting. Note: It is important that students understand the water cycle and these specific terms prior to this lesson: “evaporation,” “condensation,” “precipitation,” and “collection.”



  1. Go to the last page of the lesson and review “What Makes this Read-Aloud Complex.” This was created for you as part of the lesson and will give you guidance about what the lesson writers saw as the sources of complexity or key access points for this book. You will of course evaluate text complexity with your own students in mind, and make adjustments to the lesson pacing and even the suggested activities and questions.

  2. Read the entire book, adding your own insights to the understandings identified. Also note the stopping points for the text-inspired questions and activities. Hint: you may want to copy the questions, vocabulary words and activities over onto sticky notes so they can be stuck to the right pages for each day’s questions and vocabulary work.


The Lesson – Questions, Activities, and Tasks

Questions/Activities/Vocabulary/Tasks

Expected Outcome or Response (for each)

FIRST READING:

Display book with document camera if possible.

Read aloud the entire book with minimal interruptions. Stop to provide word meanings or clarify only when you know the majority of your students will be confused.

The goal here is for students to enjoy the book, both writing and pictures, and to experience it as a whole. This will give them some context and sense of completion before they dive into examining the parts of the book more carefully.



SECOND READING:

Display a world map that is large and that you are able to manipulate. Make sure each student has a blank copy of a world map and a colored pencil to mark the places that the drop of water appears.


As you reread each page, indicate the location on the display map. Mark the location with some kind of symbol that will make it easy to see the locations. Display the book under a document camera if possible.
If you have a globe, you could extend this activity to follow drop on a more concrete model.

Page 2 - the coast of Maine

Page 3 - southern Spain

Pages 4 – 8 - Switzerland

Page 9 - Sahara Desert

Pages 10 & 11 - African rainforest – Jungle

Pages 12 & 13 - Mumbai, India ( Mumbai is a city on the western coast of India)

Page 14 - Indian Ocean

Page 15 - Australia

Pages 16 – 18 -- Japan

Page 19 – Pacific Ocean

Pages 20-21 – Northern Alaska

Pages 22 – 23 -- Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Pages 24 – 25 -- New England (perhaps Maine)


Question: Turn to your elbow partner and discuss what you notice about Drop’s travels.

Teacher may benefit by having a premade PPT or flipchart that shows Drop’s moves around the world.


Students will mark their personal maps at the same time. They should check their elbow partner’s paper to make sure they both have their maps marked in the same location as the display map.


Teacher Notes: Students will have to use reference skills on page 14 to decide which ocean Drop is in. The journey on pages 19-20 requires discussion with students for them to understand that the world is round in order to decide where Drop lands next.

Students should notice that “Drop” travels all the way around the world.


Teacher’s Note: An anchor chart will be completed throughout the unit. A sample is included at the end of this document. The columns for the anchor chart should have three labels: “Drop’s Location in World,” “Drop’s location on the Page,” and “Stage of the Water Cycle.” Fill in the first column during reading or before each reading.

THIRD READING:

  1. Create an anchor chart with large chart paper to be displayed in the front of the room. The chart paper should have three columns labeled: “Drop’s Location in World,” (this information should be filled in from 2nd reading), “Drop’s location on the Page,” and “Stage in the Water Cycle.” Fill in the first column during reading or before each reading. You may also want to display a water cycle visual in the classroom so students can easily decide which stage of the cycle Drop is.


Teacher’s Note: Use the icons as a text features to support student understanding of the stages of the water cycle. Explain to students that some texts include graphics or illustrations to help them understand the information.



  1. Reread page 2

Where is Drop on the Page? In what stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know? Record on the anchor chart.



  1. Reread page 3

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?

“Sizzles” is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss. It directly connects to evaporation and heat. Ask students if they have ever heard sausage or bacon frying in a pan. Make the connection to the sizzling grease in a pan.





  1. Reread page 4

Where is drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?

“Airy” is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss.





  1. Reread page 5

Where is drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know? Record on the anchor chart.
“Meandering” is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss.



  1. Reread page 6

Where is drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
“Reservoir” is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss.

“Filtered” and “purified” are vocabulary words that you may choose to discuss.





  1. Reread page 7

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
“Spigot is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss.”
“Quench” is a vocabulary word that you may choose to discuss.



  1. Discussion Task - Students will work in groups to write short summaries of the page they are assigned.

The purpose of the summary of each page is for the students to have a model when writing their culminating writing task.

Divide students into 6 groups. Each group should receive a page of text that has already been read for this reading they can refer back to. The anchor chart and water cycle should be displayed so students can easily refer back if necessary. Students will write a few sentences summarizing what happened on their page. All summaries should be displayed on a flow map for a student to easily reference.




  1. The anchor chart will allow for student to have discussion at the end of the story showing how Drop travels through the water cycle.




  1. Drop is in the cloud near Maine. Drop is in the condensation and evaporation stage: “sailing in the ocean cloud.”



  1. Drop is a drop of rain. Drop is in the precipitation and evaporation stage: “Drop has grown, it’s time to rain” & “evaporating in retreat.”




  1. Drop is in the air. Drop is in the precipitation and collection stage: “the vapor freezes in mid-air” and “invite the snow to spend the night” or “drifts down on a frozen lake.”

Reread the sentence. Ask which words in the sentence help us to understand what “airy” means.





  1. Drop is a frozen liquid. Drop is in the collection phase: “One April day it melts away” or “Icy nights re-freeze the drop” or “stop-and-go, stop-and-go.”

You could explain what “meandering” means and have students act out the vocabulary word.





  1. Drop is in the pipe. Drop is in the collection stage. “Drop’s dumped into a man-made lake” or “Pumped and filter-purified.”

Explain that a “reservoir” is a man-made lake to hold water. Reread the first sentence and discuss how the information in the first sentence helps the reader to know what a “reservoir” is.


You can reread the stanza with “filtered” and “purified” to have students use context clues to discuss the meaning of these words.



  1. Drop is in the cow. Drop is in the collection stage: “to glands that “milkify” somehow.”

Have students look at the illustration and look on the page of something that the sentence would be describing.



You can reread the stanza with “quench” to have students use context clues and discuss the meaning of quench.


  1. Student summaries will be used to start the Fourth Reading to have students recall what was read in the previous reading.

FOURTH Reading:

  1. Have anchor chart with large chart paper to be displayed in the front of the room. The chart paper should have three columns labeled: “Drop’s Location in World,” (this information should be filled in from 2nd reading) “Drop’s location on the Page,” and “What Stage in the Water Cycle?” Fill in the first column during reading or before each reading. You may also want to display a water cycle visual in the classroom so students can easily decide which stage of the cycle Drop is.


Teacher Note: Use icons as a text features to support student understanding of the stages of the water cycle. Explain to students that some texts include graphics or illustrations to help them understand the information.


  1. Review the summary anchor chart and world map from the third reading.



  1. Reread page 8

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
Display the last sentence, “It’s ‘milkiness’ is left behind – vapor pure, it’s been refined.” Draw students’ attention to the picture for this discussion.

  1. Reread page 9

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
Why did the author choose these words?
Display “But like a tease, our Drop blows by… No, not a cloud stops by to cry.” What does this phrase mean?

  1. Reread page 10

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?



  1. Reread page 11

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
Display, “Camouflaged in a ghostly sky, it collides with a monkey swinging by.” Why did the author use the word “ghostly?”


  1. Reread page 12.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
If Drop is in a cloud on this page, what had to have happened to him after he landed in the water in the Rainforest?
Why did the author use the phrase “Raindrop Army” in the last line?



  1. Reread page 13

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Discuss the scale icon and refer to the glossary for a description. Discuss the force of water.


  1. Discussion Task-Students will write short summaries of their page they are assigned. The purpose in the summary of each the pages read each day is for the students to have a model when writing their culminating writing task.

Divide students into 6 groups. Each group should receive a page of text that has been read for this reading they can refer back to. The anchor chart and water cycle should be displayed so students can easily refer back to them if necessary. Students will write a few sentences summarizing what happened on their page. All summaries should be displayed on an anchor chart or flow map for a student to easily reference.





  1. The anchor chart will allow for student to have discussion at the end of the story showing that Drop continues through the water cycle.



  1. Reviewing the anchor chart and world map allows students to remember exactly where Drop is in his journey.



  1. Drop is in steam. Drop is in the evaporation stage: “Puddle Drop is warmed away”

Note in the illustration that spilled milk looks like the icon. Turn and talk to a partner to discuss the meaning of the phrase. Have students share out their discussion and come to a class consensus about the meaning. (You may use an instructional strategy that you already have established in your classroom.)





  1. Drop is in the cloud. Drop is in the condensation stage:

“to cirrus clouds that fly the sky.”
Have students identify that the words rhyme.

Turn and talk to a partner to discuss the meaning of the phrase. Have students share out their discussions and come to a class consensus about the meaning. (You may use an instructional strategy that you already have established in your classroom.)





  1. Drop is humid air. Drop is in the condensation stage: “this sudden change from warm to cool turns Drop to fog.”



  1. Drop is coming off the monkey’s tail. Drop is in the precipitation stage: “Drop gets a lift on a curly tail to a swimming hole on the jungle trail.”

Turn and talk to a partner to discuss why the author would use “ghostly” to describe the sky. Have students share out their discussion and come to a class consensus about the reason. (You may use an instructional strategy that you already have established in your classroom.)





  1. Drop is in the cloud. Drop is condensation then precipitation: “on electric flight in a thunderhead” and “the Raindrop Army storms July.”

Students should identify that he needed to have evaporated before he could become the condensation in the cloud.


Partner discussion and share out as suggested previously.



  1. Drop is on the boy. Drop is in the collection stage.



  1. Student summaries will be used to start Fifth Reading to have students recall what was read in the previous reading.




FIFTH Reading:

  1. Have large anchor chart displayed in the front of the room. The chart paper should have three columns labeled: “Drop’s Location in World,” (this information should be filled in from 2nd reading), “Drop’s location on the Page,” and “Stage in the Water Cycle.” Fill in the first column during reading or before each reading. You may also want to display a water cycle visual in the classroom so students can easily decide which stage of the cycle Drop is.


Teacher’s Note: Use icons as a text features to support student understanding of the stages of the water cycle. Explain to students that some texts include graphics or illustrations to help them understand the information.


  1. Review the summary anchor chart and map from the third reading.




  1. Reread page 14.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
Display the text, “Weight is heavy on its shoulder, squeezed in darkness, Drop is colder?” Ask, “What is happening to Drop?” and “Why is he getting colder?”


  1. Reread page 15.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?

What will happen to Drop next?


Based on the illustration, what is a moat?



  1. Reread page 16

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?


  1. Reread page 17

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?

“Porous” is a vocabulary word that that you may want to address.



  1. Reread page 18

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?



  1. Discussion Task-Students will write short summaries of their page they are assigned.

The purpose in the summary of each the pages read each day is for the students to have a model when writing their culminating writing task.

Divide students into 5 groups. Each group should receive a page of text that has been read for this reading they can refer back to. The anchor chart and water cycle displayed so students can easily refer back if necessary. Students will write a few sentences summarizing what happened on their page. All summaries should be displayed on an anchor chart or flow map for a student to easily reference.





  1. The anchor chart will allow for student to have discussion at the end of the story showing that Drop continues through the water cycle.



  1. Reviewing the anchor chart and map allows students to remember exactly where Drop is in his journey.



  1. Drop is in the sea. Drop is in the collection stage. The ocean is a large container for the collection of water.

Repeat partner discussion and share out or any discussion strategy that you may already use.





  1. Drop is in shallow water. Drop is in the collection stage: “there is gently laps the sand” or “seadrop fills their castle moat.”

Have students predict what stage will happen next, based on Drop being in a shallow moat.





  1. Drop is in the clouds. Drop is in the evaporation, condensation, and precipitation stage: “Drop does the disappearing trick,” “In stratus style” and “Drenching Drop makes ‘gushy’ dirt.”

Have students confirm or revise their predictions

based on page 15.





  1. Drop is bottom water. Drop is in the collection stage: “Drop runs into a farmer’s well.”

Teacher’s Note: You may want to trace the path of the water with your finger on page 17 to show Drop’s route.

Read the whole sentence and point out that Drop is avoiding stones and bones that block, but is able to pass through porous rock. Ask what that tells us about rock that is porous.





  1. Drop is on clothes. Drop is in the evaporation stage: “Drop ‘hangs on line’ and turns to steam.”


  1. Student summaries will be used to start Sixth Reading to have students recall what was read in the previous reading.




SIXTH Reading:

  1. Have large anchor chart displayed in the front of the room. The chart paper should have three columns labeled: “Drop’s Location in World” (this information should be filled in from 2nd reading), “Drop’s location on the Page,” and “Stage in the Water Cycle.” Fill in the first column during reading or before each reading. You may also want to display a water cycle visual in the classroom so students can easily decide which stage of the cycle Drop is.


Teacher’s Note: Use icons as a text features to support student understanding of the stages of the water cycle. Explain to students that some texts include graphics or illustrations to help them understand the information.



  1. Review the summary anchor chart from the third reading.



  1. Reread page 19.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
You may want to explain “Cumulus” if you have not taught the types of clouds.


  1. Reread page 20.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop?
Display the text, “It flaunts a fancy, frosty face and wears a coat of crystal lace.”

Ask students what type of precipitation the author is describing. “Why would he use these words to describe snow?”




  1. Reread page 21.

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
You may want to discuss what “brilliant” means in this sentence. Display the picture.

  1. Reread page 22

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?

Discuss what the “Jet Stream Express” is.




  1. Reread page 23

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?
You may need to make the connection that Drop is underground from the previous page to get the evidence that Drop was in the collection stage



  1. Reread page 24-25

Where is Drop? What stage of the cycle is Drop? Ask, how do you know?



  1. Discussion Task - Students will write short summaries of their page they are assigned.

Divide students into 5 groups. Each group should receive a page of text that has been read for this reading that they can refer back to. Display the anchor chart and water cycle so students can easily refer back if necessary. Students will write a few sentences summarizing what happened on their page. All summaries should be displayed on an anchor chart or flow map for a student to easily reference.




  1. Have students work with a partner to discuss and then share out what is happening to Drop as he moves around the world.




  1. The anchor chart will allow for student to have discussion at the end of the story showing that Drop continues through the water cycle.




  1. Reviewing the anchor chart allows students to remember exactly where Drop is in his journey.



  1. Drop is swirling. Drop is in the condensation stage: “Cumulus without a care…”




  1. Drop is in the snow. Drop is in the precipitation and collection stage. The discussion of the description of the snowflake should lead to the conclusion that Drop is in the precipitation stage. The collection stage may be described with: “and hibernates with a polar bear.”

Partner discussion and sharing.




  1. Drop is around the seed. Drop is in the collection and evaporation stage: “seeping in the thawing earth” and “ Drop’s exhaled in a vapor flight.”

We think of “smart” when we hear the word brilliant, but within the context of this sentence it means something else. Use the picture to guide students to understand that it is referring to the bright colors of the flowers.




  1. Drop is in the geyser. Drop is in the precipitation and collection stage: “to downpour over Yellowstone” and the evidence that Drop goes in the ground is found on the next page, “sucked up by the roots of an aspen tree.”

The Jet Stream is fast-flowing air currents that affect weather patterns.





  1. Drop is in the tree. Drop is in the evaporation ad condensation stage: “Evaporated one again” and “condensing on a speck of dust.”



  1. Drop is in the rainbow. Drop is precipitation: “Drop brings rain to Cape Cod Bay.”


  1. Student summaries will be used to during discussion for the Culminating Task.




  1. Students should have access to all summaries and anchor charts created.

FINAL DAY WITH THE BOOK - Culminating Task

  • Students will write a narrative where they use what they have learned to create their own book about a drop of water. Students will use what they have learned about the water cycle to retell a drop of water’s experience across the United States (or across their state). Students should be provided with a map of the United States with states labeled and a visual of the water cycle for reference while writing. Consider giving students 2-3 days for the writing task, including revision and editing.

  • Writing Prompt: Design your own book about the travels of a drop of water across the United States (or your state). Use what you learned from A Drop Around the World to make your “Drop” move through the water cycle. Make sure to include as many vocabulary words as you can.

Sample Written Response:

Page 1 - Deep inside the Pacific Ocean, Drop in his collection (body of water) is moving toward the coast.

Page 2 - When Drop comes ashore on the sandy beaches of California, he quickly evaporates (goes away) with the summer heat.

Page 3 - Not a moment too soon, Drop is whisked high above the Colorado Mountains as precipitation (snow) is falling on a mountain peak.

Page 4 - As the sun rises, the snow condenses (melts) into the Arkansas River. Drop moves again. Where will he go next?

Teacher’s Note: Although, students’ final products will take the shape of a narrative, at the heart of the assignment, they are explaining how a drop of water moves through the water cycle (W.2.2)
Vocabulary

These words merit less time and attention

(They are concrete and easy to explain, or describe events/

processes/ideas/concepts/experiences that are familiar to your students )


These words merit more time and attention

(They are abstract, have multiple meanings, and/or are a part

of a large family of words with related meanings. These words are likely to describe events, ideas, processes or experiences that most of your student will be unfamiliar with)


Page 3 – sizzles – the hissing sound water makes when it makes contact with a very hot surface

Page 5 - meandering – moving slowly

Page 7 – spigot - faucet

Page 7 - quench – satisfy a thirst

Page 11 - collides – hits

Page 13 – topples – falls over

Page 18 – hoisted – raise (as a flag)


Page 3 – airy - weightless

Page 5 - filtered – process with a filter

Page 6 - reservoir – man-made lake

Page 6 - purified – cleaned

Page 8 - milkiness - whitish in color

Page 11 - ghostly-characteristic of a ghost

Page 21 – brilliant - shining brightly

Page 17- seep – flow or leak through slowly



Page 17 - porous - having holes




Fun Extension Activities for this book and other useful Resources


  • Create a mini water cycle in a bowl

http://thewaterproject.org/resources/lesson-plans/create-a-mini-water-cycle

  • Making rain with 2-liter soda bottle – scroll down the page to find the description

http://msdsgarden.blogspot.com/search/label/Science%20Experiments

Sample completed anchor chart:

Drop’s Location

Drop’s Location on the Page

Stage of the Water Cycle

Coast of Maine

In the cloud

Condensation and evaporation

Southern Spain

A drop of rain

Precipitation and evaporation

Switzerland

In the air

Condensation and collection

Switzerland

Frozen Liquid

Collection

Switzerland

In the pipe

Collection

Switzerland

In the cow

Collection

Switzerland

Steam

Evaporation

Sahara Desert

In the cloud

Condensation

African Rainforest

In humid air

Condensation

African Rainforest

Coming off the tail

Precipitation and collection

Mumbai, India

In the cloud

Condensation and precipitation

Mumbai, India

On the boy

Collection

Indian Ocean

In the sea

Collection

Australia

Shallow water

Collection

Japan

In the clouds

Evaporation, condensation, and precipitation

Japan

Bottom Ground

Collection

Japan

Clothes

Evaporation

Pacific Ocean

Swirling

Condensation

North Alaska

In the snow

Precipitation and collection

North Alaska

Around the seed

Collection and evaporation

Yellowstone

In the geyser

Precipitation and collection

Yellowstone

In the tree

Evaporation and condensation

New England

In the rainbow

Precipitation


What Makes This Read-Aloud Complex?

  1. Quantitative Measure

Go to http://www.lexile.com/ and enter the title of your read-aloud in the Quick Book Search in the upper right of home page. Most texts will have a Lexile measure in this database.

Most of the texts that we read aloud in K-2 should be in the 2-3 or 4-5 band, more complex than the students can read themselves.

2-3 band 420-820L

4-5 band 740-1010L

820




  1. Qualitative Features

Consider the four dimensions of text complexity below. For each dimension*, note specific examples from the text that make it more or less complex.

The story has an overall message of the same water cycle occurring throughout the world. The theme is implied, but easy to identify. (Moderately Complex)

This adventure is told in chronological order with geographic locations changing on every page. There are icons which are defined in the glossary in the back of the book which help the reader to understand Drop’s adventures. Illustrations help with understanding of each scene. There are also multiple time shifts throughout the text.

Figurative and descriptive language is used throughout the story. Many of the words and phrases supply rhythm in the poem. Beginning on page 2, “Then the adventure starts to blow…on wings of wind, it’s off they go.” Vocabulary: meandering, filtered, purified, quench, collides, hoisted, topples, seep, and porous, in addition to terms that explain the water cycle.

Students will need background knowledge of the water cycle and geography.

The story has an overall message of the same water cycles throughout the world. The theme is implied, but easy to identify. (Moderately Complex)

This adventure is told in chronological order with scenes changing on every page. Illustrations do help with understanding of each scene. There is also multiple time shifts throughout the text.

Figurative and descriptive language is used throughout the story. Beginning on page 2, “Then the adventure starts to blow…on wings of wind, it’s off they go.” Vocabulary: meandering, filtered, purified, quench, collides, hoisted, topples, seep, and porous

Students will need background knowledge of the water cycle and geography.


Meaning/Purpose

Structure




Language

Knowledge Demands




  1. Reader and Task Considerations

What will challenge my students most in this text? What supports can I provide?

Figurative and descriptive language will be challenging. Throughout the lesson student support will be provided with rereading and discussion.


How will this text help my students build knowledge about the world?

This book will help students to understand that the water throughout the world which has been reused for millions of years by way of the water cycle.




  1. Grade level

What grade does this book best belong in? 2nd
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