Being Australian



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Being Australian

This unit has been written for a multistage classroom. The activities are designed to complement the learning in Stages 1, 2 and 3 of the HSIE syllabus and have students work towards the achievement of outcomes relevant to each stage. The unit can be taught as a multistage unit or as a separate unit for one of the stages. It can also be used in a class across two stages.


The green shading indicates teaching activities for all stages, while the yellow shading indicates teaching activities for students in stages one and two and the turquoise shading indicates teaching for students in stages two and three. There are also many activities that are specific to one stage and allow for group work and the development of skills and content from the HSIE syllabus. These multistage units provide an example of the ways the mandatory subject matter and outcomes can be incorporated into teaching and learning in HSIE K–6.
Being Australian provides the opportunity to develop background knowledge using a wide range of oral, visual and written text types, including discussion. Teachers can further develop this material to support the teaching of the Talking and Listening, Reading and Writing outcomes of the English syllabus.
Syllabus links

Stage 1 Outcomes

Stage 2 Outcomes

Stage 3 Outcomes

Cultures

CUS1.3 Identities

Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families.



CUS1.4 Cultural diversity

Describes the cultural, linguistic and religious practices of their family, their community and other communities.


Environments

ENS1.5 Patterns of place and location

Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features.



Cultures

CUS2.3 Identities

Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities.



CUS2.4 Cultural diversity

Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities.



Environments

ENS2.5 Patterns of place and location

Describes places in the local area and other parts of Australia and explains their significance.



Cultures

CUS3.3 Identities

Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian identities.



CUS3.4 Cultural diversity

Examines how cultures change through interactions with other cultures and the environment.


Environments

ENS3.5 Patterns of place and location

Demonstrates an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments and how individuals and groups can act in an ecologically responsible manner.



Subject Matter

Students in Stage 1 will learn about:

Cultures

  • cultural characteristics of families

  • groups to which students belong, including the family

  • symbols used by different groups, e.g. badges, flags

  • similarities and differences between ways in which families express their culture, e.g. celebrations

  • languages spoken by other groups and families

  • different ways of communicating

  • customs and practices important to students, including celebrations

  • belief systems of groups and families in their community and in other communities

  • traditional and religious stories important to students, beginning with Dreaming stories.

Environments

  • the globe as a representation of Earth

  • everyday words for location, position and direction, e.g. left, right, mountain, city

  • uses of places in their local area

  • natural, built and heritage features in the immediate environment and in other areas

  • personal and shared values and responsibilities towards features, sites, places and environments.

Students in Stage 2 will learn about:

Cultures

  • origins and backgrounds of people in the local community

  • the diversity of groups within and between communities

  • easily recognisable symbols used by the local community, e.g. coats of arms

  • languages spoken within communities, including the original Aboriginal languages spoken in the local community area

  • places of religious and spiritual significance in the local community, including the special relationship of Aboriginal people to the land

  • major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups.

Environments

  • geographical terminology, e.g. north/south/east/west, Equator, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, North/South Pole

  • significant natural, heritage and built features in the local area, New South Wales and Australia, and their uses

  • the location of major cities, rivers and mountains in New South Wales and the capital cities in Australia

  • local and other Australian communities.

Students in Stage 3 will learn about:

Cultures

  • cultural influences and other factors affecting identity, e.g. peer pressure, popular culture

  • the cultural diversity of Australia and other nations

  • national symbols (e.g. national anthem, flags, coat of arms), national culture represented by ballads, songs and colours, and significant sites (e.g. the Opera House, Uluru, the Snowy Mountains Scheme)

  • colloquial words associated with cultural influences

  • traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations.

Environments

  • physical, political and cultural regions and main reference points in Australia and the world, including the continents and some capital cities

  • geographical terminology, e.g. latitude, longitude

  • selected natural or built heritage sites in the world, through case studies.


Resources

The Equity Resource Library provides a borrowing service for teachers in DET schools.

Phone: (02) 9582 5860

Fax: (02) 9550 2874

Address: 11-13 Swanson Street, Erskinville 2043

Email: equity.sydney@det.nsw.edu.au

Online query form: http://equityresourcelibrary.det.nsw.edu.au


  1. Atlases, maps and globes including an Aboriginal languages map.

  2. Discovering Democracy Units of work (available online at www.curriculum.edu.au/democracy and follow the links to units online.)

  3. Discovering Democracy Readers for both Middle and Upper Primary (includes teachers guides) 1999

  4. Australians All 2001, Big book from Discovering Democracy for Lower Primary (includes teachers guide)

  5. Treasures, 1999 DET Stage 1 teaching resource: Teachers book available online at www.schools.nsw.edu.au/learning/k_6/hsie/cldistribres.php

  6. Talking Identity, 2002 DET Stage 2 teaching resource

  7. Big Mob Books for Little Fullas, 1996 BOS

  8. Our National Flag since 1901, video from Australian National Flag organisation www.australianflag.org.au

  9. We Remember, 2001, Big book kit from Curriculum Corporation and Veterans Affairs

  10. NSW War Memorials web site: www.warmemorialnsw.asn.au

  11. Families picture kit, Peter Leyden or selected library books

  12. Festivals in Australia, McMillan or selected library books that display families around the world.

  13. Convict Fleet to Dragon Boat, CD-ROM 1998, available from National Archives. Additional teaching support available online at www.naa.gov.au/educate.dragon/index.htm

In addition teachers might like students to use the OneWorld web site www.abc.net.au/civics/oneworld and go to Celebrations and Commemorations.


Part 1: Being Australian: Features of Australia

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

ENS 1.5 Patterns of place and location

Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features.



ENS 2.5 Patterns of place and location

Describes places in the local area and other parts of Australia and explains their significance.



ENS 3.5 Patterns of place and location

Demonstrates an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments and how individuals and groups can act in an ecologically responsible manner.



CUS1.3 Identities

Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families.



CUS2.3 Identities

Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australia and community identities.



CUS3.3 Identities

Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian identities.



Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Introduce and discuss a map of Australia.

Ask students to locate where they live and any other places they know of in Australia.

Ask students to locate Australia on the world globe.
Ask students what they consider to be special about Australia. In small groups students brainstorm and mind map ideas. Students report back and compare their ideas with others.
Show students a picture of or an actual Australian flag. View video Our National Flag since 1901. Explain that all countries have a special flag and national anthem. Explain components of the flag. Students complete an outline of the flag correctly. (see page 83, DD Middle Primary)

Review and explain the words to Advance Australia Fair. (page 84, DD Middle Primary or Big Book Australians All, last page.)



Outline map of Australia. Student task: Mark on the map of Australia where you live and other places you know. Label them. Around the map put in your ideas of what you think is important about Australia.

ENS 1.5

  • uses a range of geographical terms to describe the location and features (e.g. east, west, mountain, hill, city) and terms for geographical tools (e.g. maps, globes, atlases)



  • recognises the globe as a representation of Earth, differentiating between land and water

CUS1.3

  • recognises the importance of flags and other symbols of Australia




  • estimates the location of places of personal importance on a map of Australia.

Introduce and discuss a map of Australia.

Ask students to locate where they live and any other places they know of in Australia.

Ask students to locate Australia on the world globe.
Ask students what they consider to be special about Australia. In small groups students brainstorm and mind map ideas. Students report back and compare their ideas with others.
Show students a picture of, or an actual, Australian flag. View video Our National Flag since 1901. Explain that all countries have a special flag and national anthem. Explain components of the flag. Students complete an outline of the flag correctly. (see page 83, DD Middle Primary)

Review and explain the words to Advance Australia Fair. (page 84, DD Middle Primary Big Book Australians All, last page.)



Outline map of Australia

Student task: Draw in the state borders, locate and label state and national capitals. Add other places of importance. Around the map put in your ideas of what you think is important about Australia.

ENS 2.5

  • locates and names the capital city of Australia and of each state, and major regional centres



  • identifies the location of Australia in relation to the Equator, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, North and South poles



CUS2.3

  • explains the significance of some symbols used to represent Australia



  • locates and names the capital city of Australia and each state, major regional centres and state borders.

Introduce and discuss a map of Australia.

Ask students to locate where they live and any other places they know of in Australia.

Ask students to locate Australia on the world globe.
Ask students what they consider to be special about Australia. In small groups students brainstorm and mind map ideas. Students report back and compare their ideas with others.
Students locate Australia on a map of the world.

Discuss location in reference to other countries, land masses and hemispheres.

Using an atlas identify reference points, seas and oceans around Australia.

Complete a map of Australia showing states and territories.

Compare this map to an Aboriginal languages map. Discuss differences between the maps, e.g. what are the obvious differences? What has happened to the Aboriginal language groups on the map with the states and territories? Which language groups are divided by state and territory boundaries, and what problems could this have caused? Which language groups are located around major capital cities?

Outline map of Australia

Student task: Draw in the state borders, locate and label state and national capitals. Add in seas and oceans. Shade some areas to identify Aboriginal language groups, particularly around own area and some of the main cities. Around the map put in your ideas of what you think is important about Australia.


ENS3.5

  • uses maps and globes to locate global and Australian reference points, e.g. hemispheres, political states, lines of latitude and longitude, mountains and oceans, physical and cultural regions

  • maps areas of Aboriginal language groups superimposed onto today’s Australia

  • discusses changes to human settlement of Australia

  • CUS3.3

  • identifies some factors that have contributed to Australian cultural identity and how these are represented as national symbols




  • uses a range of atlases and maps to accurately locate state borders, capital cities, seas and oceans.

  • Superimposes the location of some of the Aboriginal language groups


Part 2: Being Australian: Australian Identity

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

CUS1.3 Identities

Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families.



CUS2.3 Identities

Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australia and community identities.



CUS3.3 Identities

Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian identities.



Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Develop and stimulate discussion on “What is important about being Australian?” Use the DD Big Book Australians All, I am Australian page 22. Use this text to focus discussion on what values we hold as Australians and what symbols represent Australia. Begin to include information on a class chart that is kept and developed over the course of the unit.

Brainstorm “Who lives in Australia?” Encourage discussion focus by asking:

Are all families the same? Who was born in another country? etc.

Create a poster using magazine pictures showing many Australians.


Using Families picture kit (Peter Leyden) discuss how families are similar and different.

Students select the picture, which best represents, their family. Discuss and give reasons why this picture was chosen.


Students draw and label their own family. Present to the class.
Discuss and list the place of birth of students or their parents. Valuable teaching ideas are available in Treasures: The Gallery. Suitable student worksheets and photo broadsheets are also available in this DET resource. Teachers book available at (2).
Locate these places on the globe and world map.

Model a family tree to include children and their family up to their grandparents. Include country of origin and illustrate.

Review class chart “What is important about being Australian?”


CUS1.3

  • gives information about their own family background, including languages spoken at home, religion(s), traditions, practices, customs, celebrations and stories




  • identifies languages spoken in the school and other communities and participates in activities that involve using a different language




  • identifies characteristics that make another family different or similar to their own




  • gives information about own family background including language(s) spoken at home, religion, traditions, practices, customs, celebrations and stories

Develop and stimulate discussion on “What is important about being Australian?” Use the DD Big Book Australians All, I am Australian page 22 and Common Ground, page 22, found in the DD Middle Primary Readers. Use these texts to focus discussion on what values we hold as Australians and what symbols represent Australia. Begin to include information on a class chart that is kept and developed over the course of the unit.

In groups students draw a values shield and illustrate with six symbols that they would use to represent Australia for someone overseas. They should choose six symbols to represent things that they believe really identify Australia, and that most Australians would recognise and value. See page 71 and Handout 1: We Remember DD Middle Primary Units.

Examine the Commonwealth Coat of Arms (Handout 2: We Remember, DD Middle Primary Units, also available in DD poster kit) without revealing what it is. Ask students where they might have seen this symbol. Consider its meaning, asking students whether they can identify any of the components, and, when it is used today.

Examine the Australian flag. Use the video Our National Flag since 1901 or refer to the web site:



www.australianflag.org.au

Research the floral emblem (the wattle) and discuss as above. Discuss with students who uses or needs these symbols.

What do the symbols above say about Australia? Why are they important? Do they represent all Australians?

The Discovering Democracy units are accessible online at (1)

Review class chart “What is important about being Australian?”


CUS2.3

  • uses text to identify values that considered to be important to Australian society




  • identifies and describes significant symbols of state and national life in Australia


  • examines different symbols representing Australia and evaluates their purpose, significance and importance

  • explains how symbols reflect Australian identity

Develop and stimulate discussion on “What is important about being Australian?” Use the DD Big Book Australians All, I am Australian page 22, Common Ground, page 22 in the DD Middle Primary Readers, and The People of the South Land, page 13 and Antidote, page 20 in the DD Upper Primary Units. Use these texts to focus discussion on what values we hold as Australians and what symbols represent Australia. Begin to include information on a class chart that is kept and developed over the course of the unit.
In groups students draw a values shield and illustrate with six symbols that they would use to represent Australia for someone overseas. They should choose six symbols to represent things that they believe really identify Australia, and that most Australians would recognise and value. See page 71 and Handout 1: We Remember DD Middle Primary Units.
Examine the Commonwealth Coat of Arms (Handout 2: We Remember DD Middle Primary Units, also available in DD Poster kit) without revealing what it is. Ask students where they might have seen this symbol. Consider its meaning, asking students whether they can identify any of the components, and, when it is used today.
Examine the Australian flag. Use the video Our National Flag since 1901 or refer to the web site:

www.australianflag.org.au

Research the floral emblem (the wattle) and discuss as above. Discuss with students who uses or needs these symbols.

What do the symbols above say about Australia? Why are they important? Do they represent all Australians today? Why/ why not?
Students develop a debate or write a discussion developing aspects of:

What symbols are important to Australia today? How useful are the symbols we have to represent the values we have here in Australia?

The Discovering Democracy units are accessible online at (1)
Review class chart “What is important about being Australian?”


CUS3.3

  • investigates the ways in which Australians express their identity




  • investigate the Australian values, characteristics, features and symbols that are recognised nationally and internationally




  • demonstrates an understanding of different viewpoints about what is an Australian identity and gives their own viewpoint

(1) www.curriculum.edu.au/democracy

Follow links to units online.

(2) http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/learning/k_6/hsie/cldistribres.php

This is the direct link to the resource on the NSW Department of Education and Training’s web site.



Part 3: Being Australian: Similar and Different

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

CUS1.3 Identity

Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families.



CUS2.3 Identity

Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities.



CUS3.3 Identity

Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australia identities.



CUS1.4 Cultural diversity

Describes the cultural, linguistic and religious practices of their family, their community and other communities.



CUS2.4 Cultural diversity

Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities.



CUS3.4 Cultural diversity

Examines how cultures change through interactions with other cultures and the environment.



Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Discuss language(s) spoken at home, food, celebrations, etc. Refer to resources such as Cultural Celebrations and Festivals in Australia (McMillan) or use a range of library books that focus on “families around the world” to extend discussion.

Students brainstorm or research different ways of saying hello or other greetings. Create a poster illustrating these.

Discuss similarities and differences between families in the class. Discuss points such as who lives in my house? What we do on the weekend, etc.

Brainstorm and list the origin of birth of children in the class and their parents or grandparents. Graph these results and discuss the outcomes (e.g. country where most were born, reasons why there are so many different groups represented on the graph, etc.).


…Stage 1 continues…

Read and share traditional stories from some of the groups represented in the class or community. Include Dreaming stories particularly traditional stories of the local area. (Refer to protocol, page 14 of Talking Identity, DET resource and also Teacher’s Handbook in Big Mob Books for Little Fullas). A good source of Dreaming stories is the Australian Museum website at (1). Discuss meaning or messages of the stories and their place in the culture they represent. Where possible invite people from the community. Look for videos, CDs etc for a variety of text types.


Listen to and sing songs from the cultures represented in the class or community.
Invite parents or members of the community into the classroom to speak to the students. This could include ACLO or CLO.
Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”

CUS1.3

  • shares cultural information on family background including language(s), religion(s), traditions, practices, customs, celebrations and stories




  • identifies characteristics and practices that make another person or family different or similar to self or own family



CUS1.4

  • identifies the family life of others in their community and in other communities



  • participates in activities that involve the communication of cultural symbols, practices and customs, e.g. music, song, dance, art and traditional dress

Brainstorm and list the birth place of children in the class and their parents or grandparents. Graph these results and discuss the outcomes, e.g. country where most were born, reasons why there are so many different groups represented on the graph, etc. Use ABS data to compare the class or school to Australia in general.

Refer to Table BO5 Birthplace (Countries)



Use ABS BO5 Birthplace (Countries)

Create a poster using magazine pictures showing many Australians. Write common greetings, phrases, words, icons under the heading “We are Australian”.

Brainstorm and list the contributions made to the Australian way of life as a result of the richness of Australia’s diversity, e.g. food.

Brainstorm cultural activities that are part of the community and their significance to the community. This could include sporting centres, performing and creative arts, museums, churches and other places of religious significance including Aboriginal cultural sites. How might these cultural centres be similar or different to cultural centres in other communities? Are they found in all communities? What do communities without these facilities use? Support material for this activity can be found in DD Middle Primary Units: Joining In.

Read and share traditional stories from some of the groups represented in the class or community. Include Dreaming stories particularly traditional stories of the local area. (Refer to protocol, page 14 of Talking Identity, DET resource and also Teacher’s Handbook in Big Mob Books for Little Fullas). A good source of Dreaming stories is the Australian Museum website at (1). Discuss meaning or messages of the stories and their place in the culture they represent. Where possible invite people from the community. Look for videos, CDs etc for a variety of text types.

(see also DD Readers for Middle Primary)

Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”


CUS2.3

  • gathers and displays information that identifies the diversity of the origins and backgrounds of people in the local community



  • identifies and examines a range of community groups




  • gathers information about the roles, purpose, practice and values of different features of the community



CUS2.4

  • listens to and retells traditional, religious and ethical stories that are part of the lives of a diverse range of Australians




  • describes a Dreaming story in the context of its purpose to teach value and respect for others in the community

Brainstorm and list the birth place of children in the class and their parents or grandparents. Graph these results and discuss the outcomes, e.g. country where most were born, reasons why there are so many different groups represented in the graph, etc. Use ABS data to compare own class or school to the Australia in general.

Refer to Table BO5 Birthplace (Countries).



Use ABS BO5 Birthplace (Countries)

Compare class, school or local community with Australia. Does your community have a similar multicultural make-up as other parts of Australia? Why or Why not?

Create a poster using magazine pictures showing many Australians. Write common greetings, phrases, words, and icons under the heading “We are Australian”.

Brainstorm and list the contributions made to the Australian way of life as a result of the richness of Australia’s diversity, e.g. food.

Students brainstorm who they think are significant people and why. Examine and discuss findings and commonalities, e.g. why are many significant Australians sportsmen? What does this say about Australian society?

Research and present a short biography of significant Australians who were not born in Australia, e.g. Mary Reiby, Mary Lee, Peter Lalor, Syd Einfeld, Harry Seidler. See also DD Middle Primary Units: We Remember, Handout 11 for a more comprehensive list of names. Handout 12 is a biography proforma.


Discuss and define cultural diversity and pluralistic society. How is it valuable? How are we united? What tensions does it cause? These issues may be discussed through critical thinking activities such as DeBono’s Thinking Hats.

Students can make statements about the findings and reflect on how these attitudes and issues may impact on their lives.

Read and share traditional stories from some of the groups represented in the class or community. Include Dreaming stories particularly traditional stories of the local area. (Refer to protocol, page 14 of Talking Identity, DET resource and also Teacher’s Handbook in Big Mob Books for Little Fullas). A good source of Dreaming stories is the Australian Museum website at (1). Discuss meaning or messages of the stories and their place in the culture they represent. Where possible invite people from the community. Look for videos, CDs etc for a variety of text types.

(see also DD Readers for Upper Primary)


Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”



CUS3.3

  • gathers and collates information on the origins and diversity of Australian communities




  • compares data and decides if own community reflects or is different to the diversity of other Australian communities




  • illustrates the ways in which Australians express their diversity



  • examines the contribution of significant Australians, who were born overseas, to our society



  • discusses how a multicultural community has influenced and changed Australian society

CUS3.4

  • investigate the purpose of people expressing their culture through different stories



(1) http://www.dreamtime.net.au/dreaming/storylist.htm

Part 4: Being Australian: Multicultural Australia

Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

CUS 1.3 Identity

Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families



CUS2.3 Identity

Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities.



CUS3.3 Identity

Describes different cultural influences and their contributions to Australian identities.




CUS1.4 Cultural diversity

Describes the cultural, linguistic and religious practices of their family, their community and other communities.



CUS2.4 Cultural diversity

Describe different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities.



CUS3.4 Cultural diversity

Examines how cultures change through interactions with other cultures and the environment.



Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Activities

Indicators

Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”
Looks at the school badge or emblem. What does it show and what is its significance.

List features of the school and local community that reflect our cultural identity. This could include homes, street names, parks, sporting fields, monuments, shops etc.

If available take a clear photo of the local war memorial. Copy onto an OH to make more accessible. Or use the big book We Remember from Curriculum Corporation and Dept of Veteran Affairs, use the web site: www.warmemorialnsw.asn.au

Look at who is on it. Is there anyone with the same surname as you? Are any of these people’s names featured in the local area?

Is there now a difference between the names on the War Memorial and the names in the class?
Develop a set of questions for family members.

Arrange for students to find out when family member(s) first arrived in Australia and their country of origin(s).

Include on class timeline.

Students bring a favourite object, toy or book to school, or select one from the classroom. Provide opportunities for each student to talk about what they have chosen and why. Highlight similarities and differences in children’s choices.


Discuss and illustrate what it means to be an Australian. Create their own Australian identity shield showing images that represent what they think it means to be an Australian.

Present and explain to class.


Refer to class chart “What is important about being Australian?” Identify how their ideas may have developed over the course of the unit.

Work in across stage groups to prepare an item for class, school or community presentation. Use the scenario: You are representing Australia at an international conference, what would you wear, carry, display, sing etc. Include students own verse, song, drama, costumes and role plays.

See Teaching Strategies and Practices: Presentations (page 197), Role Play (page 203) and Simulations (page 204) of Board of Studies Units of Work.


CUS1.3

  • recognises the importance of symbols of cultural identity

CUS1.4

  • looks for similarities and differences in the local community


CUS1.3

  • investigate family history and cultural background of own family



CUS1.4

  • recognise the importance of artefacts and other symbols to explain culture


CUS1.3

  • draw images of their own Australian identity


CUS1.3

  • models aspects of Australian identity

Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”
Arrange for students to find out when family member(s) first arrived in Australia and their country of origin(s). Use this as a starting point to investigate the information on the CD-ROM Convict Fleet to Dragon Boat. Text versions of this material is available in the “Resources” section of the CD-ROM so that printed copies of suitable information can be used to model student tasks or if computer access is limited.

Students use the “Timeline” section on the CD-ROM to investigate the era(s) that is relevant to their own families. Record interesting information from the CD-ROM timeline and if possible incorporate own family history details and illustrations. Display this information as part of a larger class timeline.


Students can then investigate examples of how their own family culture and identity has adapted over time. Look at: Anglicising of names,

changes in family traditions, e.g. the way religious or important events are celebrated,

religious background, different languages spoken and foods eaten at home and at celebrations. Include where possible a family artefact of cultural significance, this could include traditional dress. Illustrate and explain its cultural significance or purpose. Present and explain to the class.

Refer to class chart “What is important about being Australian?” Identify how their ideas may have developed over the course of the unit.

Work in across stage groups to prepare an item for class, school or community presentation. Use the scenario: You are representing Australia at an international conference, what would you wear, carry, display, sing etc. Include students own verse, song, drama, costumes and role plays.

See Teaching Strategies and Practices: Presentations (page 197), Role Play (page 203) and Simulations (page 204) of Board of Studies Units of Work.



CUS2.3

  • explores relevant eras relating to own families migration to Australia

CUS2.4

  • develops a more in-depth understanding of migration issues



  • identifies and discusses the cultural, linguistic and religious diversity of communities in Australia


CUS2.3

  • shows a developing understanding of the complexities of Australian identities

Regularly revise class chart “What is important about being Australian?”
Arrange for students to find out when family member(s) first arrived in Australia and their country of origin(s). Use this as a starting point to investigate the information on the CD-ROM Convict Fleet to Dragon Boat. Text versions of this material is available in the “Resources” section of the CD-ROM so that printed copies of suitable information can be used to model students tasks or if computer access is limited.

Students use the “People” section on the CD-ROM and choose interviews of different people who are from the same country as their family members or who came to Australia at much the same time as their family members.

Look at two or three different interviews.

In each interview look at:

Why did they leave their homeland?

Why did they choose to come to Australia?

Describe their feelings towards the adaptations they had to make to the Australian environment and context.

Identify if the roles, rights and responsibilities of family members are different to what you have experienced.

Describe beliefs and attitudes on such things as religion, gender, diet etc.

Identify the barriers that these individuals have had to overcome, this might include literacy, attitudes, gender, diet, etc.

Present findings to the class.

Refer to class chart “What is important about being Australian?” Identify how their ideas may have developed over the course of the unit.

Work in across stage groups to prepare an item for class, school or community presentation. Use the scenario: You are representing Australia at an international conference, what would you wear, carry, display, sing etc. Include students own verse, song, drama, costumes and role plays.

See Teaching Strategies and Practices: Presentations (page 197), Role Play (page 203) and Simulations (page 204) of Board of Studies Units of Work.



CUS3.3

  • researches relevant eras relating to own families migration to Australia


CUS3.4

  • examines first hand recounts of migrant experiences

  • investigates different cultural influences on Australia


CUS3.3

  • demonstrates a clear understanding of the complexities of Australian identity

Name: _________________________________________ Date: ___________________




AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS 2001

B06 BIRTHPLACE (COUNTRIES)

Using a variety of statistical information on country of origin is a common teaching activity used by teachers to illustrate the cultural diversity of Australian communities. Teachers will often ask “Who was born in another country?’ to collect information on the local community that can be compared to the wider Australian community.




AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS 2001 Census of Population and Housing B06 BIRTHPLACE (COUNTRIES)




Persons

Rounded off to nearest 1000

%

Australia

13 629 685

13 630

72.00

Canada

27 289

27

0.14

China (excludes SARs and Taiwan Province) (a)

142 780

143

0.75

Croatia

51 909

52

0.27

Egypt

33 432

33

0.18

Fiji

44 261

44

0.23

France

17 268

17

0.09

Germany

108 220

108

0.57

Greece

116 431

116

0.61

Hong Kong (SAR of China) (a)

67 122

67

0.35

India

95 452

95

0.50

Indonesia

47 158

47

0.25

Ireland

50 235

50

0.26

Italy

218 718

219

1.15

Korea, Republic of (South)

38 900

39

0.21

Lebanon

71 349

71

0.38

Macedonia FYROM (b)

43 527

44

0.23

Malaysia

78 858

79

0.42

Malta

46 998

47

0.25

Netherlands

83 324

83

0.44

New Zealand

355 765

356

1.88

Philippines

103 942

104

0.55

Poland

58 110

58

0.31

Singapore

33 485

33

0.18

South Africa

79 425

79

0.42

Sri Lanka

53 461

53

0.28

Turkey

29 821

30

0.16

United Kingdom (c)

1 036 245

1036

5.46

United States of America

53 694

54

0.28

Viet Nam

154 831

155

0.82

Yugoslavia, Federal Republic of

55 365

55

0.29

Born elsewhere overseas (d)

708 069

708

3.73

Not stated

1 034 120

1034

5.45

Overseas visitors

203 101

203

1.07

Total

17 892 423







(a) SAR is an abbreviation of ‘Special Administrative Region’. SARs comprise ‘Hong Kong (SAR of China)’ and ‘Macau (SAR of China)’.

(b) FYROM is an abbreviation of ‘Former Yugolsav Republic of Macedonia’.

(c) Includes ‘England’, ‘Scotland’, ‘Wales’, ‘Northern Ireland’, ‘Channel Islands’, ‘Isle of Man, and ‘United Kingdom, nfd’.

(d) Includes ‘Inadequately described’, ‘At sea’ and ‘Not elsewhere classified’.

Note:


An important factor to be considered in looking at population is the contribution of overseas migration to population growth. Of the 3.9 million people counted as being born in an overseas country at the 1996 Census, 3.1 million or 80% were usually resident in capital cities. This proportion was even higher among those who had recently arrived in Australia, with 495 200 or 86% of people who had arrived since 1991 living in the capital cities. In contrast, 58% of the Australian-born population was living in capital cities. The greatest contrast was in New South Wales where 83% of the overseas-born population lived in Sydney, compared to 55% of the Australian-born population. This concentration of the overseas-born in the capitals is evident in every State and has made an important contribution to the population growth of those cities. (Reference: ABS, Population Growth and Distribution, 2035.0, 1996, page 19)


HSIE STAGE 2 & 3 MARCH 2003 Page of

NSW Department of Education and Training



Curriculum Directorate http://www.curriculumsupport.nsw.edu.au/




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