Auckland District Health Board


Income and standard of living



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Income and standard of living


Table : Unmet need reported by Māori aged 15 years and over to keep costs down in the last 12 months, Auckland DHB, 2013

Actions taken a lot to keep costs down

Auckland DHB

New Zealand

Estimated number

%

(95% CI)

%

(95% CI)

Put up with feeling the cold

2,000**

6.3***

(3.1,

9.5)

11.0

(10.2,

11.8)

Go without fresh fruit and vegetables

1,000**

3.6**

(1.1,

6.1)

5.4

(4.8,

6.0)

Postpone or put off visits to the doctor

500**

2.2**

(0.5,

3.8)

8.8

(7.9,

9.6)

Source: Te Kupenga 2013, Statistics New Zealand customised report.
Note: ** sampling error is 50% or more but less than 100%

In 2013, an estimated 2,000 Māori adults (6%) reported putting up with feeling cold a lot to keep costs down during the previous 12 months, 1,000 (4%) had gone without fresh fruit and vegetables, and 500 (2%) had often postponed or put off visits to the doctor.

Table : Children aged 0–17 years living in families where the only income is means-tested benefits, Auckland DHB, 2006 and 2013

Year

Māori families

Non-Māori families

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)

2006

2,640

22.4

(21.7,

23.2)

6,291

8.8

(8.6,

9.0)

2.56

(2.46 ,

2.67)

13.7

2013

2,721

22.9

(22.2,

23.7)

6,246

8.3

(8.1,

8.5)

2.76

(2.65,

2.87)

14.6

Source: Statistics New Zealand, 2006 and 2013 Census
Notes: Māori families include at least one Māori member. Non-Māori families have no Māori members.
Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.

Nearly one in four children living in Māori families were in families where the only income was means-tested benefits. Children in Māori families were 2.8 times as likely as children in non-Māori families to be in this situation in 2013.

Table : Children and adults living in households with low incomes, Auckland DHB, 2013

Age group

Māori households

Non-Māori households

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)







Children 0–17 years

3,597

35.8

(34.9,

36.8)

17,034

25.4

(25.1,

25.8)

1.41

(1.37,

1.45)

10.4

Adults 18 years & over

8,037

27.8

(27.3,

28.3)

54,897

24.9

(24.7,

25.0)

1.12

(1.10,

1.14)

2.9

Source: 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand
Notes: % is age-standardised. Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.
A Māori household is a household with at least one Māori resident. Non-Māori households have no Māori residents.
Household income is equivalised using the revised Jensen scale. Low income is defined as an equivalised household income under $15,172.

Over a third of children in Māori households (around 3,600) were in households with low equivalised household incomes, 41% higher than the proportion of other children. Over a quarter of the adults in Māori households (around 8,000) lived in low income households, 12% higher than the percentage of other adults.

Table : Households with no access to a motor vehicle, Auckland DHB, 2006 and 2013

Measure

Māori households

Non-Māori households

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)







Households

2006

1,689

12.4

(11.9,

13.0)

12,138

10.1

(9.9,

10.3)

1.23

(1.17,

1.29)

2.3

2013

2,097

14.2

(13.6,

14.8)

14,424

11.2

(11.1,

11.4)

1.26

(1.21,

1.32)

3.0

People (% age-standardised)

2006

3,987

9.4

(9.2,

9.7)

20,169

5.0

(5.0,

5.1)

1.87

(1.81,

1.94)

4.4

2013

4,941

10.6

(10.3,

10.9)

25,917

6.3

(6.2,

6.4)

1.67

(1.62,

1.73)

4.3

Source: 2006 and 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand
Notes: A Māori household is a household with at least one Māori resident. Non-Māori households have no Māori residents.
Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.

In 2013, 14% of Māori households and 11% of non-Māori households had no motor vehicle. The proportion of Māori households without a vehicle increased between 2006 and 2013. Residents of Māori households were two-thirds more likely than residents of other households to have no access to a motor vehicle.

Table : People in households with no access to telephone, mobile/cell phone, internet, or any telecommunications, Auckland DHB, 2013

Mode of tele-communication

Māori households

Non-Māori households

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)

No mobile/cell phone

5,973

11.7

(11.4,

12.1)

46,548

11.5

(11.4,

11.6)

1.02

(0.99,

1.05)

0.3

No telephone

11,757

25.0

(24.6,

25.4)

48,609

14.2

(14.0,

14.3)

1.77

(1.73,

1.80)

10.9

No internet

9,777

21.1

(20.8,

21.6)

43,062

10.7

(10.6,

10.8)

1.97

(1.93,

2.02)

10.4

No tele-communications

1,029

2.2

(2.0,

2.3)

3,702

1.0

(1.0,

1.1)

2.08

(1.93,

2.24)

1.1

Source: 2006 and 2013 Censuses, Statistics New Zealand
Notes: A Māori household is a household with at least one Māori resident. Non-Māori households have no Māori residents.
% is age–sex-standardised to the 2001 Māori population.
Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.

In 2013, 21% of people in Māori households had no access to the internet, 25% did not have a telephone, 12% had no cell phone, and 2% had no access to any telecommunications in the home. The largest absolute gaps between Auckland Māori and non-Māori households were in access to a telephone and the internet.





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