Auckland District Health Board


Traditional healing or massage



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Traditional healing or massage


Table : Māori aged 15 years and over who took part in traditional healing or massage in last 12 months, Auckland DHB, 2013

Auckland DHB

New Zealand

Estimated number

%

(95% CI)

%

(95% CI)

3,000*

9.5*

(5.2,

13.7)

10.9

(10.0,

11.7)

Source: Te Kupenga 2013, Statistics New Zealand customised report.
Notes: * sampling error is 30% or more but less than 50%.

An estimated 3,000 Māori adults (10%) in Auckland took part in traditional healing or massage in 2013, about the same as the national average (11%).


Wai ora

− Healthy environments


This section focuses on those aspects of social and physical environments that influence our health and well-being. Data is presented on individuals, households, and individuals living in households. A household that includes at least one Māori usual resident on Census night is categorised as a Māori household, and other households are categorised as non-Māori.

Education


Table : Adults aged 18 years and over with a Level 2 Certificate or higher Auckland DHB, 2006 and 2013

Year

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)







2006

9,972

51.5

(50.9,

52.2)

177,174

68.2

(68.1,

68.4)

0.76

(0.74,

0.77)

-16.7

2013

12,609

61.5

(60.9,

62.2)

202,290

71.9

(71.7,

72.1)

0.86

(0.85,

0.87)

-10.4

Source: 2006 and 2013 Censuses, Statistics New Zealand
Notes: Percentages are age-standardised. Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.

The proportion of Māori adults aged 18 years and over with at least a Level 2 Certificate increased from 52% to 62% between 2006 and 2013. While differences in proportions of Māori and non-Māori with Level 2 Certificate decreased over this period Māori remained 24% less likely to have attained this level of qualification.


Work


Table : Labour force status, 15 years and over, Auckland DHB, 2006 and 2013

Labour force status

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)







2006

Employed full-time

10,932

51.9

(51.3,

52.5)

148,434

52.4

(52.2,

52.5)

0.99

(0.98,

1.00)

-0.5

Employed part-time

2,577

12.1

(11.6,

12.5)

39,222

14.6

(14.5,

14.8)

0.83

(0.80,

0.86)

-2.6

Unemployed

1,380

6.6

(6.3,

7.0)

10,779

4.5

(4.4,

4.6)

1.47

(1.39,

1.55)

2.1

Not in the labour force

6,225

29.4

(28.8,

30.0)

90,105

28.5

(28.3,

28.7)

1.03

(1.01,

1.05)

0.9

2013

Employed full-time

10,551

47.2

(46.6,

47.8)

156,276

50.9

(50.7,

51.1)

0.93

(0.92,

0.94)

-3.7

Employed part-time

2,832

12.2

(11.8,

12.7)

40,749

13.5

(13.4,

13.7)

0.90

(0.87,

0.94)

-1.3

Unemployed

2,199

9.9

(9.5,

10.3)

15,780

6.0

(5.9,

6.1)

1.65

(1.58,

1.72)

3.9

Not in the labour force

7,122

30.6

(30.0,

31.2)

99,591

29.6

(29.4,

29.7)

1.03

(1.02,

1.06)

1.0

Source: 2006 and 2013 Censuses, Statistics New Zealand
Notes Percentages are age-standardised. Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.
Employed part-time includes people working 1 hour per week or more. Unemployed people who are without a paid job, available for work and actively seeking work. People not in the labour force includes people in the working age population who are neither employed nor unemployed.

Between 2006 and 2013 there was a decrease in the number and proportion of Māori adults employed full-time, and a corresponding increase in the proportion unemployed (from 7% to 10%). There was also a small increase in the proportion of people not in the labour force.

The absolute gaps between Māori and non-Māori unemployment rates increased during this time period. In 2013, Māori were 65% more likely than non-Māori to be unemployed, with an absolute gap of 4% in unemployment rates. The absolute gap in labour force participation was 1% in both periods.

Table : Leading industries in which Māori were employed, Auckland DHB, 2013



ANZSIC Industry

Auckland DHB

New Zealand

Māori

Non-Māori

Number

%

Rank

Number

%

Rank

%

Rank

Females

Education and Training

852

13.5%

1

11,271

12.4%

3

12.9%

2

Health Care and Social Assistance

852

13.5%

2

13,275

14.5%

1

17.1%

1

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

678

10.7%

3

12,936

14.2%

2

8.5%

4

Retail Trade

624

9.9%

4

8,913

9.8%

4

11.6%

3

Accommodation and Food Services

432

6.8%

5

6,510

7.1%

5

7.3%

5

Males

Construction

828

13.5%

1

7,692

7.9%

4

13.2%

2

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

690

11.3%

2

16,524

16.9%

1

9.0%

3

Manufacturing

594

9.7%

3

9,150

9.3%

2

13.4%

1

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

441

7.2%

4

4,785

4.9%

9

5.9%

7

Retail Trade

435

7.1%

5

8,244

8.4%

3

8.3%

5

Source: 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand

With the exception of professional, scientific and technical services (ranked third) service industries were the main employers of Māori women in Auckland, including education and training; health care and social assistance; retail; and accommodation and food services. For Māori men, leading industries were construction; professional, scientific and technical services; manufacturing; transport, postal and warehousing; and retail.



Table : Leading occupations of employed Māori, Auckland DHB, 2013

ANZSCO Occupation

Auckland DHB

New Zealand

Māori

Non-Māori

Number

%

Rank

Number

%

Rank

%

Rank

Females

Professionals

1,782

28.1

1

31,914

35.1

1

26.7

1

Clerical and Administrative Workers

1,260

19.8

2

16,041

17.7

2

19.5

2

Managers

981

15.5

3

15,132

16.7

3

14.4

3

Community and Personal Service Workers

825

13.0

4

9,405

10.4

5

12.9

4

Sales Workers

774

12.2

5

9,996

11.0

4

11.7

5

Labourers

345

5.4

6

3,486

3.8

7

8.3

6

Technicians and Trades Workers

243

3.8

7

3,843

4.2

6

5.0

7

Machinery Operators and Drivers

138

2.2

8

990

1.1

8

1.5

8

Males

Professionals

1,335

21.6

1

29,193

30.1

1

18.6

2

Managers

1,119

18.1

2

23,037

23.8

2

22.7

1

Technicians and Trades Workers

939

15.2

3

12,888

13.3

3

18.5

3

Labourers

717

11.6

4

6,375

6.6

6

13.6

4

Machinery Operators and Drivers

681

11.0

5

4,788

4.9

8

9.1

5

Community and Personal Service Workers

513

8.3

6

5,460

5.6

7

5.4

7

Sales Workers

468

7.6

7

8,598

8.9

4

7.1

6

Clerical and Administrative Workers

414

6.7

8

6,498

6.7

5

5.1

8

Source: 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand
Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO), major grouping

Among employed Māori women, the leading occupational groupings were professionals (28%); clerical and administrative workers (20%); and managers (16%). The next most common occupations were community and personal service workers; and sales workers. Māori men were most likely to be employed as professionals (22%); managers (18%); and technicians and trade workers (15%). These were followed by labourers; and machinery operators and drivers.

Table : Unpaid work, 15 years and over, Auckland DHB, 2013

Unpaid work

Māori

Non-Māori

Māori/non-Māori

ratio (95% CI)



Difference in percentage

Number

%

(95% CI)

Number

%

(95% CI)







Any unpaid work

18,708

87.8

(87.4,

88.3)

254,289

85.6

(85.5,

85.8)

1.03

(1.02,

1.03)

2.2

Looking after disabled/ill household member

2,209

10.1

(9.7,

10.5)

16,989

5.4

(5.3,

5.5)

1.87

(1.79,

1.95)

4.7

Looking after disabled/ill non-household member

2,380

10.6

(10.2,

11.0)

20,247

6.0

(5.9,

6.1)

1.77

(1.70,

1.84)

4.6

Source: 2013 Census, Statistics New Zealand
Notes Percentages are age-standardised. Ratios in bold show a statistically significant difference between Māori and non-Māori.

Most Māori adults (88%) worked without pay in 2013. Māori were more likely than non-Māori to look after someone who was disabled or ill without pay, both within the home and outside of the home.





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