Around the World 10th Grade World Literature Designed by: Angela Boddie ened 4414 Fall 2007



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Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I review the journal entries. I will assess these using the check system (√,√-, or √+) as suggested by Burke (201). I will examine them qualitatively, looking for comprehension, participation, and completion.
Extension: Extend discussion of persuasion in politics.
Remediation: Make sure you keep an eye on students with special needs and give them extra time to finish their journal entries.
Works Consulted:

Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom,



Curriculum, and the Profession. Portsmouth. NH: Heinemann, 2003.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and

IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

Weisel, Elie. “The Perils of Indifference.” 12 April 1999. 1 December 2007



<http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/wiesel.htm>.

Lesson Plan #4

Wednesday of Week 4 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Lesson Title: Using Satire to Persuade
Annotation: This lesson introduces students to satire as a method for persuasion by critiquing a satire of schoolwork in a cartoon and then reading a satirical children’s book by Dr. Seuss in order to familiarize students in a light-hearted context before introducing a more advanced example of satire tomorrow in Gulliver’s Travels.
Primary Learning Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of satire and be able to identify it in multiple forms.
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

    1. The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      1. Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works such as newspaper articles and editorials, magazine articles, journal articles, and/or other informational texts.

      2. Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

      3. Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.

  2. ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods. The student

    1. Relates a literary work to non-literary documents and/or other texts relevant to its historical setting.

  3. ELA10RC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas. The student

    1. Explores life experiences related to subject area content.

    2. Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects.

    3. Determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concepts.


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student

    1. Identifies messages and themes from books in all subject areas.

    2. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

    3. Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area.

    4. Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline.

    5. Examines the author’s purpose in writing.

  2. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

  1. d. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

  2. e. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.

  3. f. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

  4. g. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

  5. h. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

  1. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

    1. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2) Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 6) Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

  • 7) Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

  • 12) Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


Materials:

  1. Transparency of Foxtrot Cartoon (see end of lesson plan)

  2. Transparencies/PowerPoint of “The Butter Battle Book”

  3. PowerPoint for Satire Mini-Lesson (see end of Lesson Plan)

  4. A copy of the “Satirical Techniques” Handout (end of lesson plan) for each student


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): PowerPoint presentation

Procedures:

  1. Remind students that their papers are due in 2 days. (1 minute)

  2. Put Foxtrot transparency on overhead and allow students to read on their own. (5 minutes) Ask:

    1. What is Paige’s argument?

    2. What is her mom’s argument?

    3. Who is the most persuasive, and why?

  3. Read: The Butter Battle Book (25 minutes)

    1. Announce that it was written in 1984, and ask what they know about the year.

    2. Read the book

    3. Ask them to share immediate thoughts and reactions. Try to direct these comments toward making correlations between historical/current events.

  4. Mini-lesson on Satire (see PowerPoint at the end of the lesson) (10 minutes)

    1. Read first few slides

    2. Hand out Satirical Techniques Handout (see end of lesson)

  5. Small-group activity: (14 minutes)

    1. Have students get into groups of 2-3

    2. Review the handout and find an instance of when Dr. Seuss used each technique

  6. For homework, remind students that their papers are due in 2 days. (2 minutes)

Assessment: Class Discussion

During discussion of the references in the texts, listen for historical accuracy in the details that students share as well as correct identification of the satirical techniques. Encourage and support clear connections between the historical references and the plot and characters in the passages.


Extension: Encourage students to investigate historic references in other texts that they read, using general reference resources in the library. Students might journal about at least one historical reference each week or in each set that they submit for your review.
Remediation: Partner students with special needs with astudent sitting next to them during the identification activity (I included pictures/illustrations with the definitions to help increase comprehension).
Works Consulted:

Amend, Bill. Foxtrot. 28 September 2007. GoComics.Com. 1 December 2007



<http://www.gocomics.com/foxtrot/2007/09/23/>.

Gardner, Traci. “From Dr. Seuss to Jonathon Swift: Exploring the History behind the Satire.”



ReadWriteThink, International Reading Association, and NCTE. 1 December 2007 <http://www.readwritamazon.cethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=936%20>.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and

IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

Suess, Dr., and Theodor Geisel. The Butter Battle Book. NY: Random House, 1984.


Cartoon to put on transparency:




Satirical Techniques Definitions

The following techniques to make a comment or criticism about a particular subject or character.



Exaggeration To enlarge, increase, or represent something beyond normal bounds so that it becomes ridiculous and its faults can be seen. Caricature is the exaggeration of a physical feature or trait. Cartoons, especially political cartoons, provide extensive examples of caricature. Burlesque is the ridiculous exaggeration of language. For instance, when a character who should use formal, intelligent language speaks like a fool or a character who is portrayed as uneducated uses highly sophisticated, intelligent language.

Incongruity To present things that are out of place or are absurd in relation to its surroundings. Particular techniques include oxymoron, metaphor, and irony.

Parody To imitate the techniques and/or style of some person, place, or thing in order to ridicule the original. For parody to be successful, the reader must know the original text that is being ridiculed.

Reversal To present the opposite of the normal order. Reversal can focus on the the order of events, such as serving dessert before the main dish or having breakfast for dinner. Additionally, reversal can focus on hierarchical order—for instance, when a young child makes all the decisions for a family or when an administrative assistant dictates what the company president decides and does.
Information and definitions from

Gardner, Traci. “From Dr. Seuss to Jonathon Swift: Exploring the History behind the Satire.”



ReadWriteThink, International Reading Association, and NCTE. 1 December 2007 <http://www.readwritamazon.cethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=936%20>.
PowerPoint for Satire:





Lesson Plan #5

Thursday of Week 4 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Lesson Title: “Satire”
Annotation: This lesson continues to instruct students on the use of satire as a method for persuasion by reviewing the definition of satire and satirical techniques. The teacher then reads a passage from Jonathon Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels and explains the significance of the satire by pointing out the historical connections. Students are then requested to write their own version on satire in a free write.
Primary Learning Outcome: Students will gain an understanding of satire and be able to identify it in multiple forms as well as be able to write in this form.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will be exposed to an important piece from the canon of literature by Jonathon Swift.
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

    1. The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      1. Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works such as newspaper articles and editorials, magazine articles, journal articles, and/or other informational texts.

      2. Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

      3. Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.

  2. ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods. The student

    1. Relates a literary work to non-literary documents and/or other texts relevant to its historical setting.

  3. ELA10RC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas. The student

    1. Explores life experiences related to subject area content.

    2. Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects.

    3. Determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concepts.


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student

    1. Identifies messages and themes from books in all subject areas.

    2. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

    3. Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area.

    4. Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline.

    5. Examines the author’s purpose in writing.

  2. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

  1. d. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

  2. e. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.

  3. f. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

  4. g. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

  5. h. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

  1. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

    1. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2) Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 6) Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

  • 7) Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

  • 12) Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


Materials:

  1. Student piece for interactive warm-up (have back-up ready)

  2. Copies of bite-sized selection from Gulliver’s Travels - Big Endians and Little Endians Passage (Swift) for each student

  3. Transparency with “historical connections”(Gardner) (see end of lesson)


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): Smart board and link to speech audio (backup plan – have a volunteer(s) read if technology isn’t working)
Procedures:

  1. Remind students that their persuasive essays are due TOMORROW (1 minute)

  2. Discuss student piece (5 minutes): Have student explain what it is and what argument they think the creators were trying to make. Allow the class to comment.

  3. Review Satirical techniques (see lesson plan 4 from yesterday) (5 minutes)

  4. Read “Big Endians and Little Endians” Passage (Swift) (20 minutes)

    1. Ask for comments, specifically for correlations between the Swift and Dr. Seuss and instances of satire

  5. Put “historical references” transparency on the overhead and review. (see end of lesson) (9 minutes)

  6. Have students get out piece of paper and do a free write using satire. (10 minutes)

  7. Ask volunteer(s) to share journal results with class (5 minutes)

  8. Review homework (continue working on your paper – its due TOMORROW!) (5 minutes)


Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I review the free writes. I will assess these using the check system (√,√-, or √+) as suggested by Burke (201). I will examine them qualitatively, looking for comprehension of satire while also looking for participation and completion.
Extension: Extend discussion of satire in politics.
Remediation: Make sure you keep an eye on students with special needs and give them extra time to finish their free writes on Satire.
Works Consulted:

Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom,



Curriculum, and the Profession. Portsmouth. NH: Heinemann, 2003.

Gardner, Traci. “From Dr. Seuss to Jonathon Swift: Exploring the History behind the Satire.”



ReadWriteThink, International Reading Association, and NCTE. 1 December 2007 <http://www.readwritamazon.cethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=936%20>.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and

IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

Swift, Jonathon. Gulliver’s Travels. Lee Jaffe. 2 December 2007



<http://www.jaffebros.com/lee/gulliver/contents.html>

Transparency for Historical References:





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