Around the World 10th Grade World Literature Designed by: Angela Boddie ened 4414 Fall 2007



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Part 1: Each group should:

  1. Pick a topic:

    1. You want your mom to let you go to the concert on Friday.

    2. Your brother wants to go swimming in the Artic Ocean, and you are trying to convince him to try the Atlantic first.

    3. Your friend made a racist statement towards another friend, and doesn’t think anything of it. You want them to understand how your other friend felt.

    4. You’re trying to convince the manager of the local McDonald’s to hire you.

  1. Make up a one- to two-sentence argument for each of the 3 tricks:

    1. Logos – use logic

    2. Pathos – use emotion

    3. Ethos – use ethics and morality

  1. Present to the Class


Part 2: Each group member should:

  1. Share your research thesis with your group

  2. Brainstorm a one (or two) sentence argument for your thesis using

    1. Logos

    2. Pathos

    3. Ethos

  3. Share your arguments with your group

Lesson Plan #2

Monday of Week 4 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Essential Question for Lesson: “How does your worldview affect that of others?”
Annotation: I’ll start the day by reading “In Egypt, Tourism and Islam Live Uneasily Side-by-Side” and having a discussing on the implications of this information as well the persuasiveness of the piece. Students will turn in their outlines for their persuasive essays and will make a trip to the library to further research their topic.
Primary Learning Outcome: The primary goal for the day is for students to gather and prepare their research for their persuasive essays.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will also continue to increase their understanding of how perspective influences those around oneself, as well as gaining a better (visual) understanding of what I expect from them in the persuasive essay.
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

    1. The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      1. Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

  2. ELA10RL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. The student

    1. Demonstrates awareness of an author’s use of stylistic devices for specific effects.


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Employs group decision-making techniques such as brainstorming or a problem-solving sequence (i.e., recognizes problem, defines problem, identifies possible solutions, selects optimal solution, implements solution, evaluates solution).

  2. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

    1. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.


National Standards:

  • 7)  Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience

  • 12)  Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


Materials:

  1. Example of persuasive essay on transparency (see end of lesson)

  2. Handout for library research trip (see end of lesson)


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): Overhead transparency for essay sample
Procedures:

  1. Collect Students’ outlines for their persuasive paper (2 minutes)

  2. Read: “In Egypt, Tourism and Islam Live Uneasily Side-by-Side”; discuss: (15 minutes)

    1. Why do you think the authors, Jeffrey Fleishman and Noha El-Hennawy, wrote this article? (What is their argument?)

    2. Are they persuasive? Why?

    3. How does your worldview affect that of others?

  3. Put sample of persuasive essay (Banta) on overhead and run over the components. Explain that while it was an 8th-grade paper, it has the primary components of a good persuasive essay. Ask them to identify these elements, and ask for comments and questions. (10 minutes)

  4. Hand out library research sheets and explain assignment and expectations (6 minutes)

  5. Go to the library (27 minutes)


Assessment: This lesson will be assessed when I collect the outlines. These will be assessed for completion and whether or not they are turned in; if they are turned in, the student will have 5 points added to their persuasive paper grade. I will also write 1-2 sentence comments and supportive feedback on them before returning them to students.
Extension: Have students put all their resources in MLA format.
Remediation: Make sure you keep an eye on students with special needs, and consider pairing them with partners for the library trip.
Works Consulted:

Banta, Sharon. “Should Marine Mammals Be in Captivity?” Scholastic.com. 1 December 2007



<http://teacher.scholastic.com/dolphin/conwin1.htm>.

Fleishman, Jeffrey, and Noha El-Hennawy. “In Egypt, Tourism and Islam Live Uneasily Side-

by-Side.” The Los Angeles Times. 7 October 2007. 1 December 2007 http://travel.latimes.com/articles/la-trw-in-egypt-tourism-and-islam-live-uneasily-side-by-side7oct07.

Georgia Department of Education. “Tenth-Grade Literature and Composition.”

GeorgiaStandards.Org. 1 December 2007 <http://www.georgiastandards.org/DMGetDocument.aspx/Grade%20Ten%20with%20tasks.pdf?p=6CC6799F8C1371F67D8363E8F9CAA85D187EAAAFB8BDD43842E399D5927075D7&Type=D

National Council of Teachers of English. “Standards for English Language Arts.” NCTE and



IRA. 1 December 2007 < http://www.ncte.org/about/over/standards/110846.htm>.

frame10 Library Research Day
While you’re at the library today, your assignment is to collect your research for your persuasive essay. This involves looking on the computer, on the bookshelves, finding quotes, saving all the information, and writing your citations.
Step 1: Find the research.

  • Look up your topic on the computer

  • Write down possible sources on this paper and where they are located (ie: book, online, or newspaper)

    1. SOURCE #1

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Author(s): ____________________________________________________

      • Type of source (article, book, etc): _______________________________

      • Location: (online, library, etc): ­­__________________________________

    2. SOURCE #2

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Author(s): ____________________________________________________

      • Type of source (article, book, etc): _______________________________

      • Location: (online, library, etc): ­­__________________________________

    3. SOURCE #3

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Author(s): ____________________________________________________

      • Type of source (article, book, etc): _______________________________

      • Location: (online, library, etc): ­­__________________________________

    4. SOURCE #4 (optional)

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Author(s): ____________________________________________________

      • Type of source (article, book, etc): _______________________________

      • Location: (online, library, etc): ­­__________________________________


Step 2: Find Quotes

  • Go to the sources you found and flip through them, looking for good quotes that support your thesis.

  • Copy the quotes down here (don’t worry about paraphrasing them at this point) – copy 1-2 quotes from each source.

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    1. SOURCE QUOTE:

      • Title: _________________________________________________________

      • Quote: ________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Step 3: Put your citations and quotes in MLA format:

  • Using www.citationmachine.net OR the MLA handbook, put your citations in MLA format below. Remember, ask for help if you need it! This will be graded on your paper and will be much easier if you do this now.

  • SOURCE #1:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • SOURCE #2:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • SOURCE #3:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • SOURCE #4:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Step 4: KEEP THIS PAPER! You can use it when your putting your paper together, rather than having to find more sources and do the citations again.


Lesson Plan #3

Tuesday of Week 4 in Unit 1 of the Semester

Name: Ms. Boddie

School: MONV High School

Lesson Title: “The Perils of Indifference”
Annotation: I will begin the class by showing a poor example of a persuasive essay and the problems with it. We will then listen to Elie Wiesel’s speech and then students will respond in their journals before we discuss it as a class.
Primary Learning Outcome: Increase student’s understanding of why persuasion is necessary but difficult by understanding “the perils of indifference” – I want the students to not only see how Wiesel is persuasive in his speech but why, and how certain audiences at another point in time (during the war) would not have wanted to hear this speech.
Additional Learning Outcome (optional): Students will also gain an understanding of what not to do in their persuasive essay. They will learn about World War II history through Wiesel’s speech and about how persuasion is used in politics. They will practice their writing and communication skills while applying their knowledge of perspective and persuasion through self-reflection and analysis in their journal entries. They will be given the opportunity to practice their speaking skills in the group discussion, and can improve their listening skills.
Assessed GPS’s:

  1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

    1. The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      1. Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works such as newspaper articles and editorials, magazine articles, journal articles, and/or other informational texts.

      2. Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

      3. Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.

  2. ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods. The student

    1. Relates a literary work to non-literary documents and/or other texts relevant to its historical setting.

  3. ELA10RC4 The student establishes a context for information acquired by reading across subject areas. The student

    1. Explores life experiences related to subject area content.

    2. Discusses in both writing and speaking how certain words and concepts relate to multiple subjects.

    3. Determines strategies for finding content and contextual meaning for unfamiliar words or concepts.


Non-Assessed GPS’s (optional):

  1. ELA10RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student

    1. Identifies messages and themes from books in all subject areas.

    2. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

    3. Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area.

    4. Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline.

    5. Examines the author’s purpose in writing.

  2. ELA10LSV1 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions. The student

    1. Initiates new topics in addition to responding to adult-initiated topics.

    2. Asks relevant questions.

  1. d. Actively solicits another person’s comments or opinion.

  2. e. Offers own opinion forcefully without domineering.

  3. f. Contributes voluntarily and responds directly when solicited by teacher or discussion leader.

  4. g. Gives reasons in support of opinions expressed.

  5. h. Clarifies, illustrates, or expands on a response when asked to do so; asks classmates for similar expansions.

  1. ELA10LSV2 The student formulates reasoned judgments about written and oral communication in various media genres. The student delivers focused, coherent, and polished presentations that convey a clear and distinct perspective, demonstrate solid reasoning, and combine traditional rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description.

    1. Analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2) Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.


Materials:

  1. Copy of a poor persuasive (essay from my 11th-grade class)

  2. Copy of Weisel speech for each student


Total Duration: 1 hour block
Technology Connection (optional): Smart board and link to speech audio (backup plan – have a volunteer(s) read if technology isn’t working)
Procedures:

  1. Go over example of poor essay (5 minutes)

    1. What do you think? (What’s good? What’s bad?)

    2. What would you tell the writer to change?

    3. Is this persuasive? Why or why not?

  2. Read along as you listen to “The Perils of Indifference” (20 minutes)

  3. Ask students to respond before they discuss it in their journals (10 minutes)

    1. Journal prompts:

      1. Was Elie Wiesel persuasive? How? (Hint: which forms of rhetoric did he use?)

      2. What is your personal definition of indifference? Tell me about a personal experience you had with indifference.

  4. Discuss impressions and persuasion of “The Perils of Indifference”; allow students to share from their journals if they’d like to. (15 minutes)

  5. Review homework (continue working on your paper – its due in 3 days!) (5 minutes)




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