Around the World 10th Grade World Literature Designed by: Angela Boddie ened 4414 Fall 2007



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Syllabus page






Persuasion and Perspective

Around the World

10th Grade World Literature

Designed by: Angela Boddie

ENED 4414

Fall 2007
Literature is not the private domain of an intellectual elite. It is instead the reservoir of all mankind’s concerns.”

- Probst


Semester Plan Contents:

Rationale Page

Units Standards and Essential Questions: Page

Unit One: Nonfiction and Research Page

Unit Two: Poetry Page

Unit Three: Short Stories Page



Syllabus Page

18-Week Calendar Page

Assessments for Unit One: Page

Essay Narrative Page

Essay Prompt Page

Essay Rubric Page

Performance Project Narrative Page

Performance Project Page

Performance Project Rubric Page

Unit Exam Narrative Page

Unit Exam Page

Unit Exam Answer Key Page

Lesson Plans: Page

Day 1 Page

Day 2 Page

Day 3 Page

Day 4 Page

Day 5 Page

Day 6 Page

Day 7 Page

Day 8 Page

Day 9 Page

Day 10 Page

Works Cited Page

Persuasion and Perspective



Around the World

Semester Plan Rationale
Grade Level and Course: 10th Grade World Literature (and Composition)

Semester Focus: Forms of Persuasion as Seen in Writing from around the World

Semester Goal: I want my students to be prepared to meet academic standards for both writing proficiencies and World Literature reading requirements, while they also learn how to use their own personal voice through various forms of writing. They may not all become Poet Laureates or Doctors of Literature, but they can become familiar with the multiplicity of writing in the world and appreciate the dedication of the authors. Throughout the course of the semester I will ask students to emulate and respond to the multiple forms of text and their issues through journal entries, free writes, short stories, poems, and formal essays. When choosing the texts and assignments for the semester, I took Wiggins and McTighe’s advice to heart and searched for texts and projects that would be enduring, at the heart of the discipline, needed to be addressed, and also ones that were potentially engaging (24).
Semester Essential Questions:

  1. Is everything an argument?

  2. Does our writing always require an audience?

  3. Does our writing always have a purpose?

  4. How does writing help us think?


Summary of Each Unit:

Unit 1: Research “Nonfiction and Persuasive Writing”

I plan on starting the semester by having students read pieces of satire and nonfiction from around the world, and then work on “the hardest” type of composition – that of research and persuasive writing. I want to start this early in the semester so that they can quickly complete some of the difficult assignments that normally pile up at the end. I can then reinforce their persuasive, research, and essay-writing skills throughout the semester as they learn about other genres of writing.



This unit covers an 8-week period of 40 one-hour class periods and a smorgasbord of non-fiction texts which address perspectives from around the world. Most of these texts were written in modern times and address current issues; particularly, they address race and gender bias, religious influence, immigration, and war. I picked these pieces because they help introduce students to bite-sized (meaning, they can easily be addressed in one class period) examples of relevant non-fiction texts. We cover one fictional graphic novel – Persepolis – because it is based on historical fact and introduces students to the severe impact a narrow perspective can have on a life through the story of a girl named Marjane during Iran’s Islamic revolution. We proceed to read a number of news articles and opinion pieces as students learn about the art of persuasion and rhetorical techniques. The students are required to address of these issues in the first assessment of the unit, the essay, and they also use some articles as springboards for their performance project. I also included excerpts from non-fiction world classics such as Thomas More’s Utopia and Jonathon Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels so that students are exposed to them and understand them in the context of persuasive messages.

Unit 2 – “World Poetry and Poetry Writing”

After the rigorous Nonfiction Unit, I will ask the students to tap into their inner creativity and learn how to write poems. By presenting world poetry at the same time, students can learn about classic and modern poets while appreciating the work that goes into poems as they write their own. This unit covers a 4-week period of 20 1-hour class periods and also covers a wide range, but I focused very specifically on exposing students to classical world poetry. We cover poems about war and the question of national origin, as well as the Bhagavad-Gita and portions of Dante’s Inferno. Students will each write a poem and present it to the class in an informal “publishing circle,” and will end the unit by doing a close reading of one of the poems.


Unit 3: “Narration and Short Stories”


After studying the rigorous discipline of formal academic essays, I want students to learn that there are other genres of writing out there – I want to introduce them to international examples while they begin learning how to write their own narrative and personal pieces. The short story unit covers a 6-week period of 30 1-hour class periods and attempts to cover most of the short narratives stories that would normally be covered in a high school world literature classroom (Conestoga High School; Kennelon High School; Rexroth; Teeter). I included more pieces that would stimulate discussion and widen students understanding of both the world around them and how that world is perceived differently based on worldviews, including Oedipus, Notes from the Underground, Madame Bovary, and “All Quiet on the Western Front.” Students will write a short story of their own (to be published in the classroom) in order to learn how to appreciate the effort writers put into their work, and to give students experience with writing in different genres. They will also write personal narratives which demonstrate their understanding of the writing process and their understanding of various genres and writing styles; and, since this is the end of the semester’s emphasis on persuasion, students will also be asked to utilize their persuasive skills.
Connections among the Units

The primary theme of the unit is how perspective influences our understanding of the world and thus, the texts that we read as well. Each unit emphasizes this theme through its respective genre and endeavors to show students how a poem about war (Owen), for example, can portray just as persuasive and influential a message as a speech from a Holocaust survivor (Weisel). I tried to begin the semester by discussing current issues so that students would recognize the timelessness of human struggles as we began to study ancient and foreign texts.



Support of Interdisciplinary Instruction

This semester plan dips heavily into a wide variety of other disciplines as I struggled to create a curriculum that would open the world, quite literally, to my students while going above and beyond the national and state standards for 10th-Grade English and World Literature. I incorporate geography, sociology, history, linguistics and foreign languages, technology, philosophy, psychology, rhetoric, and political science in attempt to set a context for the texts that we read as well as enable and equip students to understand literature and life better. I want students to walk away from the semester with wanderlust – a hunger to learn and go new places in life in order to understand more of their world.

“The question of school achievement is not solely a linguistic one; the cultural messages received by children from both the school and the larger society may influence their feelings about school as well as their feelings about themselves in relation to school” (Samway 27).

Work-Place Literacy

This semester plan tries to equip students with the skills they will need not only to pass state exams, but also to enter and succeed in today’s competitive workforce. I tried to give students requirements that included high, challenging expectations while also explaining why it is important to meet these requirements. In particular, I repetitively emphasize the importance of perspective and understanding one’s audience in order to be persuasive so that students will know how to communicate persuasively on the job. Speeches, debates, creative writing, and research essays are just a few of the projects I created to enable students to become successful writers and communicators. I included a large number of low-stakes assignments so that students would have the freedom to experiment, and the chance to find a genre or style that they enjoyed and could become even more proficient in. In order to show students and parents how important writing is, I end the semester with a celebration of these achievements – I ask the students to compile all of their writing into a presentable folder which they then show off on the last day of the semester to classmates, parents, and administrators. As Jim Burke says, “Only when all our students can walk into the classroom confident of their ability to succeed in that class can we call ourselves a success” (362).


Standards for Each Unit

Unit 1: Nonfiction and Persuasive Writing

Weeks 1-8


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2)  Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 4)  Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

  • 5)  Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

  • 6)  Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.

  • 7)  Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

  • 8)  Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

  • 9)  Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

  • 10)  Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

  • 12)  Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


State Standards:

    1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

a. Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works such as newspaper articles and editorials, magazine articles, journal articles, and/or other informational texts.

b. Analyzes the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

c. Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.



    1. ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods. The student

a. Relates a literary work to non-literary documents and/or other texts from its literary period.

b. Relates a literary work to non-literary documents and/or other texts relevant to its historical setting.



    1. ELA10RL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. The student

b. Explains important ideas and viewpoints introduced in a text through accurate and detailed references or allusions to the text and other relevant works.

c. Identifies and assesses the impact of ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text.

d. Includes a formal works cited or bibliography when applicable.


    1. ELA10RC3 The student acquires new vocabulary in each content area and uses it correctly. The student

a. Demonstrates an understanding of contextual vocabulary in various subjects.

b. Uses content vocabulary in writing and speaking.

c. Explores understanding of new words found in subject area texts.


    1. ELAWLRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events, main ideas, and cultural characteristics) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the purpose, structure, and elements of nonfiction and/or informational materials and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

a. Analyzes and explains the structures and elements of nonfiction works of world literature such as philosophical essays and letters.

b. Analyzes and evaluates the logic and use of evidence in an author’s argument.

c. Analyzes, evaluates, and applies knowledge of the ways authors from different cultures use language, style, syntax, and rhetorical strategies for specific purposes in nonfiction works.


Essential questions:

  1. Is everything an argument?

  2. What steps can you take to help someone consider your viewpoint?

  3. What makes an argument convincing? What makes it unconvincing?

  4. Is an audience ever completely persuaded?

  5. How do you use arguments every day?

  1. Does our writing always require us to engage in a writing process?

  2. Does credible research represent the "Truth"?


Unit 2 – World Poetry and Poetry Writing

Weeks 9-12


National Standards:

  • 1) Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

  • 2)  Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

  • 3)  Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

  • 5)  Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

  • 6)  Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.

  • 9)  Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

  • 11)  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

  • 12)  Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).


State Standards:

    1. ELA10RL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

The student identifies and analyzes elements of poetry and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

      1. Identifies, responds to, and analyzes the effects of diction, syntax, sound, form, figurative language, and structure of poems as these elements relate to meaning.

        1. sound: alliteration, end rhyme, internal rhyme, consonance, assonance

        2. form: lyric poem, narrative poem, fixed form poems (i.e., ballad, sonnet)

        3. figurative language: personification, imagery, metaphor, simile, synecdoche, hyperbole, symbolism

    1. ELA10RC2 The student participates in discussions related to curricular learning in all subject areas. The student

a. Identifies messages and themes from books in all subject areas.

b. Responds to a variety of texts in multiple modes of discourse.

c. Relates messages and themes from one subject area to those in another area.

d. Evaluates the merits of texts in every subject discipline.

e. Examines the author’s purpose in writing.


    1. ELAWLRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events, main ideas, and cultural characteristics) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.

The student identifies and analyzes elements of poetry from various periods of world literature and provides evidence from the text to support understanding; the student:

a. Identifies, responds to, and analyzes the effects of diction, syntax, sound, form, figurative language, and structure of poems as these elements relate to meaning.



  1. sound: alliteration, end rhyme, internal rhyme, terza rima, consonance, assonance

  2. form: haiku, lyric, epic, narrative poem

  3. figurative language: personification, imagery, metaphor, epic simile, synecdoche, hyperbole, symbolism

b. Analyzes and evaluates the effects of diction and imagery (i.e., controlling images, figurative language, understatement, irony, paradox, and tone) as they relate to underlying meaning.

c. Identifies and responds to poetic forms specific to particular cultures.



    1. ELAWLRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. The student

a. Demonstrates awareness of an author’s use of stylistic devices for specific effects.

b. Draws comparisons between specific incidents in a text and broader themes that illustrate the writer’s important beliefs or generalizations about life or culturally specific beliefs or generalizations about life.



c. Includes a formal works cited or bibliography when applicable.
Essential Questions:

  1. How would you describe poetry?

  2. What are some of the difficulties poets face when they write poems?

  3. Is it okay for a poem to have multiple interpretations? Why?






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