Ap united States History Syllabus Trimester One



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AP United States History

Syllabus Trimester One

 

AP U.S. History is a course that can earn students college credit. It is a three trimester survey of American history.  The course is designed to cover from the age of exploration and discovery to the present.  Emphasis is placed on analysis of documents and primary sources, the use of critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing and mastering a body of factual information. This is a college level class, and will be taught as such. To be successful, students must take this class seriously and be prepared to put in a lot of effort throughout the year.

 

Class Expectations:
School rules will be followed at all times. The following are guidelines that students need to follow in order to be successful.
1. Students must have assignments completed before coming to class. Students will not be allowed to turn in any assignment late. Also, students will not have time to go to the library to print off assignments. They need to do that before class. Unless told otherwise, students can not email assignments to me for me to print out.

2. Students should regularly participate.

3. Students need to be a student of history. I will discuss this further below.

4. Students are expected to spend 30-60 minutes nightly at a minimum studying and completing assignments.

5. Students are expected to maintain an organized binder.

6. Students are expected to respect each other in class.

7. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the Old AP tests that I have and take them as practice throughout the semester. We will take at least two tests together. You can also access old AP tests on line at:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/exam/exam_information/2089.html

Assessments:  The length and type of assignments will vary. Please refer to the class calendar for due dates. Most assignments will have a multiplier on the grade program. So, please make sure that check the right column for points when checking the grades. The class assessments will typically be made up of the following types:


  1. History Journal: Reactions to political cartoons, maps, tables, or artwork. Students will be given one of the preceding sources and will write a few sentences in response. This will be a daily bell-ringer activity.

  2. Chapter Interactive Notes: 3 will be collected at random on a test day. Students are expected to do notes for each chapter.

  3. Reading Check Daily Quizzes: Students without an id properly displayed or that are tardy are not allowed to take the quiz and will receive a zero. Students that show up late with a pass, will have to make the quiz up before school. Any missed quiz must be made up during office time.(Fridays 7 AM-7:45)

  4. Chapter Tests-typically a combination of short answer and multiple choice questions

  5. DBQ’s(Taken from old AP Tests)

  6. FRQ’s(Taken from old AP Tests)

  7. Essays

  8. Weekly Postings to Class Website(TBD)

  9. Participation in class discussions

  10. Unit Tests

  11. Research Papers or Projects(1st Tri., 2nd Tri., and 3rd Tri.)

  12. Group and Individual Projects

  13. End of Trimester Exams

Explanations, expectations, and guidelines will be given out with each assignment and will be posted on the class website, when possible.


Textbooks and Readings
The following books are the core part of the class. Other books, articles, or essays will be added throughout the class

 

 



John Mack Faragher, Mari Jo Buhle, Daniel Czitrom, Susan H. Armitage. Out of Many:  A History of the American People (Fifth Edition, Prentice Hall 2007).

-Used for all chapters

Companion website: http://wps.prenhall.com/hss_faragher_outofmany_5/36/9243/2366341.cw/index.html

United States History, Volume 1: Taking Sides - Clashing Views in United States History, Volume 1: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction Mc Graw Hill 2008


Larry Madaras, James M SoRelle Taking Sides - Clashing Views in United States History, Volume 2: Reconstruction to the Present: McGraw Hill: 2008

David Emory Shi and George Brown Tindall. America a Narrative History. W.W. Norton Company 2007


David M. Kennedy and Thomas A. Bailey The American Spirit Volume I Eleventh Edition to 1877 Houghton Mifflin 2006
David M. Kennedy and Thomas A. Bailey The American Spirit Volume II Eleventh Edition Since 1865 Houghton Mifflin 2006
Upton Sinclair. The Jungle
Parental Contact:
As of right now, I have first hour prep for next year. I would prefer that you contact me during 7:45-8:45 AM. My phone number is 219-650-5307 Ext. 7109. I can also be emailed at: rbedwell@mvsc.k12.in.us Please call me if you have any questions about what is going on in the class. If there is a problem, I would like to know about it. Please let me have the opportunity to deal with an issue and hopefully come up with a solution.
Office Time:
Monday 3PM

Just as professors have set times for students to come and meet with them to discuss class related issues, so will I. Students are encouraged to come and ask questions, or to get extra help. I will stay after on that day to help students or other times if arranged with me ahead of time.


AP US History Test:
Students taking this class are not required to take the corresponding AP test. However, students are encouraged to take it. One of the main purposes of the class is to prepare students for the AP test. Students are encouraged to start early to successfully prepare for the test. I will draw attention to topics, events, or people that could be tested on the AP test. At the end of each chapter, I will highlight key points from each chapter that may be on the AP test. Students can possibly receive college credit depending on how well they score on the test. The test takes place in May, and is administered during the normal school day. Regardless of whether or not the test is taken, or how they perform on the test, it has absolutely no bearing on their grade for the class.

Dual Credit:
AP US History is a class that is eligible for dual credit from Purdue University North Central. This is an excellent opportunity for students to get college credit for work that they do while in high school. This credit will transfer to any state school in Indiana as a history credit, and the students will not have to take this class over. If you transfer out of state, or to a private college, the credits might still transfer. You would need to check with that school to make sure. Students will meet with someone from the Guidance Department to discuss this further.

 

 



A Student of History:
US History is everywhere around you. History can be a bit boring if you only read about it from a book. You need to try and experience it. Since there is a limited amount of time in class and in the school year in which to learn US History, students are encouraged to seek out information about it on their own. I would strongly encourage students to watch the History Channel, PBS(American Experience), or other channels that have history based shows. There is a wealth of information available to people now about US History. What I will teach them will serve as building blocks for future study. Neither I, nor our book can cover everything that a student might need to know to prepare for the AP US History test. So, students need to try and learn about it on their own. We will go on field trips to historical places or museums to help encourage students to seek out information about US History. U.S. History is a great passion of mine and I have studied it for 25 years and I am constantly learning new things. I hope that I can inspire you as a student to learn about history on your own.
Interactive Notes:
Students are required to take their notes using the Cornell Method. An example will be provided. There is no substitute for taking good notes, this is the basis for any humanities class. Students are encouraged to read each section first without writing notes, then go back and write down the main ideas. For each section, students are to write down the key points in incomplete sentences. It is easier to remember the material if it is in chunks of information, rather than in complete sentences. Students are then supposed to write a question off to the side that will help them later to quiz themselves over the material. At the bottom of the page, students are to write a summary over the section. The summary should be a brief recap of the section in a couple of sentences(1-3 maximum). For students to receive full credit for the notes, they will have to have questions, summaries, and notes for each section of the chapter.

Class Overview
This is a tentative class schedule that will be adjusted as needed. Assignments that are listed might be modified. There will be additional assignments that might replace or augment the current ones. Some of the chapters overlap the different themes and will be addressed at various times throughout the course. For exact days and specifics about the assignments or projects, check the class webpage. Readings that are listed are to be done outside of class for homework. Extra reading resources will be given during class and used for discussion or projects. The Course is divided into periods of time with a focus on the following themes:
American Identity

Views of the American national character and ideas about American exceptionalism. Recognizing regional

differences within the context of what it means to be an American.
Culture

Diverse individual and collective expressions through literature, art, philosophy, music, theater, and film

throughout U.S. history. Popular culture and the dimensions of cultural conflict within American society.
Demographic Changes

Changes in birth, marriage, and death rates; life expectancy and family patterns; population size and

density. The economic, social, and political effects of immigration, internal migration, and migration

networks.


Economic Transformations

Changes in trade, commerce, and technology across time. The effects of capitalist development, labor and

unions, and consumerism.
Environment

Ideas about the consumption and conservation of natural resources. The impact of population growth,

industrialization, pollution, and urban and suburban expansion.
Globalization

Engagement with the rest of the world from the fifteenth century to the present: colonialism, mercantilism,

global hegemony, development of markets, imperialism, and cultural exchange.
Politics and Citizenship

Colonial and revolutionary legacies, American political traditions, growth of democracy, and the

development of the modern state. Defining citizenship; struggles for civil rights.
Reform

Diverse movements focusing on a broad range of issues, including antislavery, education, labor, temperance,

women’s rights, civil rights, gay rights, war, public health, and government.
Religion

The variety of religious beliefs and practices in America from prehistory to the twenty-first century;

influence of religion on politics, economics, and society.
Slavery and Its Legacies in North America

Systems of slave labor and other forms of unfree labor (e.g., indentured servitude, contract labor) in Native

American societies, the Atlantic World, and the American South and West. The economics of slavery and

its racial dimensions. Patterns of resistance and the long-term economic, political, and social effects of

slavery.
War and Diplomacy

Armed conflict from the pre-colonial period to the twenty-first century; impact of war on American foreign

policy and on politics, economy, and society.

Trimester One

 

2 weeks



Pre-Columbian Societies:
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • Who were the migrants that peopled the Americas?

  • How did native cultures adapt to the regions of North America?

  • How did the development of farming increase the complexity of native societies?

  • What was the nature of Indian culture in the three major regions of European invasion and settlement?

Readings: Out of Many Chapter 1


-Chapter 1 Study Guide(Summer Assignment)

.
Transatlantic Encounters and Colonial Beginnings:


Themes Addressed:

Globalization

Economic Transformations

Demographics
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • What was the European background of American colonization?

  • How did the Spanish create a New World empire and extend it into North America?

  • What was the large-scale intercontinental exchange of peoples, crops, animals, and diseases?

  • What was the French role in the beginnings of the North American fur trade?

  • How did the English create their first overseas colonies in Ireland and America?

  • How did the planting of colonies by European nations compare?

  • What characterized the English and Algonquian colonial encounter in the Chesapeake?

  • What role did religious dissent play in the planting of the New England colonies?

  • What characterized the founding of the proprietary colonies?

  • What characterized Indian warfare and internal conflict at the end of the seventeenth century?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapters 2 and 3


Primary Source Documents:
John Withrop: City on a Hill speech
-Chapter 2 and 3 Study Guide

-Explorer Paper

-Taking Sides Issue #4: Was the Salem Witch Hysteria due to a fear of women?

-article and follow up discussion

-Virginia vs. Mass. DBQ


Colonial North America 1690-1754:
Themes Addressed:
Religion

Globalization

Slavery and Its legacy in North America

War and Diplomacy
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • How did the slave system develop?

  • What was the history of the slave trade and the Middle Passage?

  • How did communities develop among African Americans in the eighteenth century?

  • What connections existed between the institutions of slavery and the imperial system of the eighteenth century?

  • What was the early history of racism in America?




  • Who similarities and differences existed among eighteenth-century Spanish, English, and French colonies?

  • How did increasing European immigration affect British colonial culture?

  • How did contact with European customs and lifestyles change the cultures of Indian America?

  • What were the patterns of work and class in eighteenth-century America?

  • What tensions existed between Enlightenment thought and the Great Awakening's call for renewed religious devotion?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapters 4 and 5

-Chapter 4 and 5 Study Guide

-Ben Franklin’s Maxims: Students are to rewrite them to apply to today.

-Chapter 1-5 Quiz:

The American Revolutionary Era 1754-1789: 2 Weeks
Themes Addressed:
War and Diplomacy

Politics and Citizenship

Chapter Focus Questions:


  • What was the final struggle among Great Britain, France, and American Indian tribes for control of eastern North America?

  • How did the aftermath of the French and Indian War influence American nationalism?

  • What were Great Britain's changing policies toward its North American colonies?

  • What were the political assumptions of American republicanism?

  • How did the colonists try to achieve unity in their confrontation with Great Britain?

  • What were the major alignments and divisions among Americans during the American Revolution?

  • What were the major military campaigns of the Revolution?

  • What were the Articles of Confederation and what role did the Confederation Congress play during the Revolutionary War?

  • How did the states serve as the setting for significant political change?

  • What was the economic crisis in the aftermath of the American Revolution?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapters 6 and 7

Chapter 7: The Road to Revolution 1763-1775-American Spirit

Issue #6: Were the Founding Fathers Democratic Reformers?-Taking Sides Vol. #1


Chapter 6 Notes

Chapter 6 Study Guide Questions

Chapter 6 Vocab and People Quiz

Chapter 7 Notes

Chapter 7 Study Guide Questions

Chapter 6 and 7 Quiz

The Early Republic 1789-1815: 1 week
Themes Addressed:
Politics and Citizenship

War and Diplomacy

Culture
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • What tensions and conflicts existed between local and national authorities in the decades after the American Revolution?

  • What struggles were experienced in the drafting of the Constitution and to achieving its ratification?

  • How was the first national government established under the Constitution?

  • How did American political parties begin?

  • What were the first stirrings of an authentic American national culture?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapter 8, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Virginia Constitution, Virginia Declaration of Rights, and U.S. Constitution


-Chapter 8 Notes

-U.S. Constitution Study Guide

-Chapter 8 Vocab and People Quiz

-U.S. Constitution Test and Chapter 8 Test


An Agrarian Republic, 1790-1824: 1 Week
Themes Addressed:
Demographic Changes

Globalization

Politics and Citizenship
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • How did America’s economy develop in a world of warring great powers?

  • What was the role of Jefferson’s presidency and his agrarian republicanism in forging a national identity?

  • How did the divisive War of 1812 end colonial dependency?

  • How did westward expansion become a nationalizing force?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Launching the New Ship of State, 1789-1800-American Spirit

Chapter 9 Study Guide



Chapter 9 Quiz
Transformation of the Economy and Society in Antebellum America: 4 Weeks
Themes Addressed:
Demographic Changes

Slavery and Its legacy in North America

Economic Transformations

Reform
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • How did the slave system dominate southern life?

  • What were the economic implications of "King Cotton"?

  • How did African Americans create communities under slavery?

  • What was the social structure of the white South?

  • Why was the white South increasingly defensive?

  • What were the pre-industrial ways of working and living?

  • What was the nature of the market revolution?

  • What effects did industrialization have on workers in early factories?

  • In what ways did the market revolution change the lives of ordinary people?

  • How did the middle class emerge?

  • What new social problems accompanied urbanization and immigration?

  • How did reformers respond to social problems?

  • What were the origins and political effects of the abolitionist movement?

  • What was the involvement of women in reform efforts?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapter 10,12, and 13

Chapter 11: The Triumps and Travails of the Jeffersonian Republic, 1800-1812-American Spirit

Chapter 12: The Second War for Independence and the Upsurge of Nationalism-1812-1824-American Spirit

Issue #11: Did Slavery Destroy the Black Family-Taking Sides Vol. I

Chapter 10 Notes

Chapter 10 Study Guide

Chapter 10 Quiz

Chapter 12 Notes

Chapter 12 Study Guide

Chapter 13 Notes



Chapter 12/13 Test
DBQ: Jacksonian Democrats(1990)
Project:
Antebellum Reformer Roundtable Assignment-Students will discuss problems of the era and how their reformer would have felt about this topic and what they would have proposed to fix the problem.
Antebellum Reformer 2 Page Paper: Students write a two page paper about their reformer.

The Transformation of Politics in Antebellum America: (Combined with Previous Theme)
Themes Addressed:
Politics and Citizenship

American Identity

Culture

Economic Transformation
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • What was the role of Andrew Jackson’s presidency in affirming and solidifying the new democratic politics?

  • What part did the transportation revolution play in unifying the nation?

  • How was the basic two-party pattern of American political democracy established?

  • How did writers and artists and their audiences create a distinctive American cultural identity?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapter 11

Chapter 11 Notes

Chapter 11 Study Guide

Chapter 11 Test

Territorial Expansion and Manifest Destiny: 1 Week
Demographic Change

Economic Transformation

War and Diplomacy

Globalization
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • How did the political effects of expansion heighten sectional tensions?

  • How did the concept of manifest destiny affect continental expansion?

  • How was the frontier development in Oregon, Texas, and California similar and different?

Reading: Out of Many: Chapter 14

Primary Source Document:

Document 14-2: A Newspaper Man Declares the “Manifest Destiny” of the United States in 1845: Questions to accompany the document.

Chapter 14 Notes

Chapter 14 Take Home Quiz Packet

Donner Party Video: Reaction Paper


The Crisis of the Union
Themes Addressed:
Politics and Citizenship

Slavery and Its Legacy in North America
Chapter Focus Questions:


  • Why did the Whigs and Democrats fail to find a lasting political compromise on the issue of slavery?

  • What caused the end of the Second American Party System and the rise of the Republican Party?

  • Why did the secession of the southern states follow the Republican Party victory in the election of 1860?

Readings: Out of Many: Chapter 15

Chapter 15 Notes

Chapter 15 Study Guide

Chapter 15 Quiz

1st Trimester Final Review Paper:

How had America developed from a series of struggling colonies into a power that rivaled France and Great Britain? In doing the paper, you need to discuss the social, political, and economic changes that took place during the 18th and 19th Century. 3-5 Pages Long Due Nov. 19th


Final Exam: 100 Questions Multiple Choice.

APUSH


Class Calendar
This is a tentative schedule that will/can be adjusted if needed. Please consult the website for any changes to this. Assignments that are listed may be changed, or alternate assignments may be added.


Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1

Aug. 19-23









1st Day of Class

-Pass out Textbooks

-Rules and Expectations


Chapter 1 Notes
Lecture

Chapter 1 Notes
Lecture
Chapter 1 Quiz

2

Aug. 26-30



Chapter 2 Notes
Lecture

Chapter 2 Notes
Lecture
Chapter 2

Quiz


Chapter 3 Notes
Lecture

Chapter 3 Notes
Lecture
Chapter 3 Quiz

Chapter 4 Notes
Lecture

3

Sept. 2-6



Labor Day

Chapter 4 Notes
Lecture
Chapter 4 Quiz

Chapter 5 Notes
Lecture

Chapter 5 Notes
Lecture
Chapter 5 Quiz

-Chapter 1-5 Test

-Chapter 1-5 Study Guide Questions Due(Summer Assignment)





Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

4.

Sept. 9-13



Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter

Intro. Movie



Chapter 6 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.162-172


Lecture
-DBQ Intro

Chapter 6

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.173-182


Lecture
-DBQ Intro

Chapter 6

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.183-194


-DBQ Intro
Class Discussion

Chapter 6

Test
-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)


5.

Sept. 16-20



Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter

Intro. Movie



Chapter 7 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.200-211


Lecture
-DBQ Intro

Chapter 7

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.212-220


Lecture
-DBQ Intro

Chapter 7

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.221-229


-DBQ Intro

Class Discussion



Chapter 7

Test


-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)

-Pickup Take Home DBQ #1 1999 DBQ


6.

Sept. 23-27



Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter

Intro. Movie


-DBQ #1 1999 DBQ Due

Chapter 8 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.236-244


Lecture

Chapter 8

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.245-254


Lecture

Chapter 8

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.255-262


Class Discussion

Chapter 8

Test


-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)





Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

7.

Sept. 30-

Oct. 4


Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter Intro. Movie

Chapter 9 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.268-277


Lecture

Chapter 9

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.278-288


Lecture

Chapter 9

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.289-301


Class Discussion


Chapter 9

Test
-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)


8.

Oct. 7-


Oct. 11

Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter Intro. Movie

Chapter 10 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.308-319


Lecture

Chapter 10

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.320-329


Lecture

Chapter 10

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.330-339


Class Discussion

Chapter 10

Test
-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)


9.

Oct. 14-


Oct. 18


Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter Intro. Movie

Chapter 11 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.346-355


Lecture

Chapter 11

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.356-365


Lecture

Chapter 11

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.366-375


Class Discussion

Chapter 11

Test
-Chapter Key Points Wrap-up

(AP Review)

-Pickup DBQ #2

1990 DBQ





Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10.

Oct. 21-


Oct. 25


-Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
-Chapter Intro. Movie
-DBQ #2 1990 DBQ Due

Chapter 12 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.380-390


Lecture

Chapter 12

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.391-401


Lecture


Chapter 12

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.402-411


Class Discussion


No School Fall Break

11.

Oct. 28-


Nov. 1

No School Fall Break

Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
Chapter Intro. Movie
Chapter 13 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.416-426



Chapter 13

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.427-438


Lecture

Chapter 13

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.439-447


Lecture



Class Discussion

12.

Nov. 4-


Nov. 8

-Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions
-Chapter Intro Movie
-Pick up Final Exam Review Sheet

Chapter 14 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.454-464


Lecture

Chapter 14

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.465-475


Lecture

Chapter 14

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.476-483


Class Discussion

Chapter 12/13/14

Test


Chapter 12/13/14 Key Points

(AP Review)





Week

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

13.

Nov. 11-15



Chapter Intro. Movie
Pick up Chapter Discussion Questions

Chapter 15 Reading Quiz #1

Pgs.490-500


Lecture

Chapter 15

Reading


Quiz #2

Pgs.501-511


Lecture

Chapter 15

Reading


Quiz #3

Pgs.512-522



Chapter 15

Quiz
Review Paper #1



14.

Nov. 18-22



Review Paper #1 Due

Final Exam

Chapters 1-15 100 Questions



Final Exam

Chapters 1-15 100 Questions



Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving

Class Reading Schedule



The pages need to read by the date that is given. A 5 question Quiz will be given on that day over the material.


Date

Chapter

Page #’s

9-10-2013

6

162-172

9-11-2013

6

173-182

9-12-2013

6

183-194

9-17-2013

7

200-211

9-18-2013

7

212-220

9-19-2013

7

221-229

9-24-2013

8

236-244

9-25-2013

8

245-254

9-26-2013

8

255-262

10-1-2013

9

268-277

10-2-2013

9

278-288

10-3-2013

9

289-301

10-8-2013

10

308-319

10-9-2013

10

320-329

10-10-2013

10

330-339

10-15-2013

11

346-355

10-16-2013

11

356-365

10-17-2013

11

366-375

10-22-2013

12

380-390

10-23-2013

12

391-401

10-24-2013

12

402-411

10-29-2013

13

416-426

10-30-2013

13

427-438

10-31-2013

13

439-447

11-05-2013

14

454-464

11-06-2013

14

465-475

11-07-2013

14

476-483

11-12-2013

15

490-500

11-13-2013

15

501-511

11-14-2013

15

512-522





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