Ante-nicene fathers



Download 6.35 Mb.
Page124/127
Date31.05.2016
Size6.35 Mb.
1   ...   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127

362362 Lev. x. 1, 2.

363363 Num. xvi. 33.

364364 1 Kings xiv. 10.

365365 Hist. Sus. ver. 56.

366366 Ibid. ver. 52, etc.; Ex. xxiii. 7.

367367 Matt. xxiv. 48, etc.; Luke xii. 45.

368368 [Contrast this spirit of a primitve Father, with the state of things which Wiclif rose up to purify, five hundred years ago.]

369369 Num. xvi. 15.

370370 1 Sam. xii. 3.

371371 2 Cor. ii. 17.

372372 2 Cor. vii. 2.

373373 Isa. lx. 17.

374374 Matt. xxiv. 45, 46.

375375 1 Cor. xii. 28.

376376 [Note the limitation; not the succession only, but with it (1) pure morality and holiness and (2) unadulterated testimony. No catholicity apart from these.]

377377 Polycarp, Papias, Pothinus, and others, have been suggested as probably here referred to, but the point is involved in utter uncertainty. [Surely this testimony is a precious intimation of the apostle’s meaning (Rom. ii. 12–16), and the whole chapter is radiant with the purity of the Gospel.]

378378 1 Sam. xviii.

379379 2 Sam. xi. 27.

380380 2 Sam. xii. 1, etc.

381381 1 Kings viii. 27.

382382 1 Kings iv. 34.

383383 1 Kings x. 1.

384384 1 Kings xi. 1.

385385 [1 Pet. iii. 19, 20.]

386386 Rom. iii. 23. [Another testimony to the mercy of God in the judgment of the unevangelized. There must have been some reason for the secrecy with which “that presbyter’s” name is guarded. Irenaeus may have scrupled to draw the wrath of the Gnostics upon any name but his own.]

387387 Rom. iii. 23. [Another testimony to the mercy of God in the judgment of the unevangelized. There must have been some reason for the secrecy with which “that presbyter’s” name is guarded. Irenaeus may have scrupled to draw the wrath of the Gnostics upon any name but his own.]

388388 Rom. xi. 21, 17.

389389 Ex. xxxii. 6.

390390 1 Cor. x. 1, etc.

391391 Matt. xx. 16.

392392 Matt. xxv. 41.

393393 1 Cor. vi. 9, 10.

394394 Matt. xviii. 8, 9.

395395 1 Cor. v. 11.

396396 Eph. v. 6, 7.

397397 1 Cor. v. 6.

398398 Rom. i. 18.

399399 Luke xviii. 7, 18.

400400 2 Thess. i. 6–10.

401401 Ps. xxxiv. 16.

402402 Matt. xxvi. 24.

403403 Matt. x. 15.

404404 [Eph. v. 4. Even from the eutrapelia which might signify a bon-mot, literally, and which certainly is not “scurrility,” unless the apostle was ironical, reflecting on jokes with heathen considered “good.”]

405405 Matt. xxv. 41.

406406 Matt. xxv. 34.

407407 2 Cor. ii. 15, 16.

408408 Num. xiv. 30.

409409 [Jonah iv. 11. The tenderness of our author constantly asserts itself, as in this reference to children.]

410410 1 Cor. xiv. 20.

411411 Ex. ix. 35.

412412 Matt. xiii. 11–16; Isa. vi. 10.

413413 2 Cor. iv. 4.

414414 Rom. i. 28.

415415 2 Thess. ii. 11.

416416 Ex. iii. 19.

417417 Ex. iii. 22, xi. 2. [Our English translation “borrow” is a gratuitous injury to the text. As “King of kings” the Lord enjoins a just tax, which any earthly sovereign might have imposed uprightly. Our author argues well.]

418418 Ex. i. 13, 14.

419419 This perplexed sentence is pointed by Harvey interrogatively, but we prefer the above.

420420 [A touching tribute to the imperial law, at a moment when Christians were “dying daily” and “as sheep for the slaughter.” So powerfully worked the divine command, Luke vi. 29.]

421421 Matt. vii. 5.

422422 This is, if he inveighs against the Israelites for spoiling the Egyptians; the former being a type of the Christian Church in relation to the Gentiles.

423423 Matt. vii. 1, 2.

424424 Luke iii. 11.

425425 Matt. xxv. 35, 36.

426426 Matt. vi. 3.

427427 As Harvey remarks, this is “a strange translation for ekliphte” of the text. rec., and he adds that “possibly the translator read ektraphte.”

428428 Luke xvi. 9.

429429 We here follow the punctuation of Massuet in preference to that of Harvey.

430430 [The Fathers regarded the whole Mosaic system, and the history of the faithful under it, as one great allegory. In everything they saw “similitudes,” as we do in the Faery Queen of Spenser, or the Pilgrim’s Progress. The ancients may have carried this principle too far, but as a principle it receives countenance from our Lord Himself and His apostles. To us there is often a barren bush, where the Fathers saw a bush that burned with fire.]

431431 See Rev. xv., xvi.

432432 [Thus far we have a most edifying instruction. The reader will be less edified with what follows, but it is a very striking example of what is written: “to the pure all things are pure.” Ti. i. 15.]

433433 Gen. xix. 33.

434434 Gen. xix. 35.

435435 “Id est duae synagogue,” referring to the Jews and Gentiles. Some regard the words as a marginal gloss which has crept into the text.

436436 Gen. xix. 31, 32.

437437 Deut. xxxii. 6, LXX. [Let us reflect that this effort to spiritualize this awful passage in the history of Lot is an innocent but unsuccessful attempt to imitate St. Paul’s allegory, Gal. iv. 24.]

438438 Matt. xi. 19.

439439 Ps. iii. 6.

440440 Jer. xxxi. 26.

441441 Comp. Clem. Rom., chap. xi. Josephus (Antiq., i. 11, 4) testifies that he had himself seen this pillar.

442442 The Latin is “per naturalia,” which words, according to Harvey, correspond to di emmhnorroia". There is a poem entitled Sodoma preserved among the works of Tertullian and Cyprian which contains the following lines: -“

Dicitur et vivens, alio jam corpore, sexusMunificos solito dispungere sanguine menses.”



443443 Matt. v. 13.

444444 The poem just referred to also says in reference to this pillar: -“

Ipsaque imago sibi formam sine corpore servansDurat adhuc, et enim nuda statione sub aethramNec pluviis dilapsa situ, nec diruta ventis.Quin etiam si quis mutilaverit advena formam,Protinus ex sese suggestu vulnera complet.”[That a pillar of salt is still to be seen in this vicinity, is now confirmed by many modern travellers (report of Lieut. Lynch, United States Navy), which accounts for the natural inference of Josephus and others on whom our author relied. The coincidence is noteworthy.]



445445 Harvey remarks here, that this can hardly be the same presbyter mentioned before, “who was only a hearer of those who had heard the apostles. Irenaeus may here mean the venerable martyr Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna.”

446446 “Quassum et futile.” The text varies much in the mss.MSS; .

447447 Gen. i. 3.

448448 John i. 3.

449449 Eph. iv. 5, 6.

450450 Eph. iv. 16; Col. ii. 19.

451451 “Constabit ei.”

452452 We here read “secundum quos” with Massuet, instead of usual “secundum quod.”

453453 “Concurvans,” corresponding to sugkamptwn, which, says Harvey, “would be expressive of those who were brought under the law, as the neck of the steer is bent to the yoke.”

454454 The Latin is, “per proprium visum.”

455455 [If this and the former chapter seem to us superfluous, we must reflect that such testimony, from the beginning, has established the unity of Holy Scripture, and preserved to us—The Bible.]

456456 1 Cor. ii. 14. [The argument of this chapter hinges on Ps. xxv. 14, and expounds a difficult text of St. Paul. A man who has the mind of God’s Spirit is the only judge of spiritual things. Worldly men are incompetent critics of Scripture and of Christian exposition.

457457 Rom. i. 21.

458458 Isa. liii. 3.

459459 Zech. ix. 9.

460460 Ps. cxviii. 22.

461461 Isa. liii. 7.

462462 Ex. xvii. 11.

463463 Isa. xi. 12.

464464 Comp. book iii. 20, 4.

465465 Dan. vii. 13.

466466 Mal. iv. 1.

467467 Isa. xi. 4.

468468 Matt. iii. 12; Luke iii. 17.

469469 Harvey points this sentence interrogatively.

470470 “Temperamentum calicis:” on which Harvey remarks that “the mixture of water with the wine in the holy Eucharist was the universal practice of antiquity . . . the wine signifying the mystical Head of the Church, the water the body.” [Whatever the significance, it harmonizes with the Paschal chalice, and with 1 John v. 6, and St. John’s Gospel, xix. 34, 35.]

471471 John xix. 34.

472472 This sentence is very obscure in the Latin text.

473473 Iliad, ix. 312, 313.

474474 The text is obscure, and the construction doubtful.

475475 The Latin here is, “quae est ex virgine per fidem regenerationem.” According to Massuet, “virgine” here refers not to Mary, but to the Church. Grabe suspects that some words have been lost.

476476 Matt. xii. 41, 42.

477477 Matt. xxii. 43.

478478 Matt. xxii. 29; Luke xi. 21, 22.

479479 Literally, “who was strong against men.”

480480 In fine; lit. “in the end.”

481481 In semetipsum: lit. “unto Himself.”

482482 We here follow the reading “proferant:” the passage is difficult and obscure, but the meaning is as above.

483483 Matt. xxiii. 24.

484484 The Greek text here is skhnobatoun (lit. “to tabernacle:” comp. eskhnwsen, John i. 14) kaq ekasthn genean en toi" anqrwpoi": the Latin is, “Secundum quas (dispositiones) aderat generi humano.” We have endeavoured to express the meaning of both.

485485 The following section is an important one, but very difficult to translate with undoubted accuracy. The editors differ considerably both as to the construction and the interpretation. We have done our best to represent the meaning in English, but may not have been altogether successful.

486486 The Greek is susthma: the Latin text has “status.”

487487 The Latin is, “character corporis.”

488488 The text here is, “custodita sine fictione scripturarum;” some prefer joining “scripturarum” to the following words.

489489 We follow Harvey’s text, “tractatione;” others read “tractatio.” According to Harvey, the creed of the Church is denoted by “tractatione;” but Massuet rrenders the clause thus: [“True knowledge consists in a very complete tractatio of the Scriptures, which has come down to us by being preserved (‘custoditione_0’ being read instead of ‘custodita_0’) without falsification.”

490490 Comp. 2 Cor. viii. 1; 1 Cor. xiii.

491491 i.e., the heretics.

492492 Comp. above, xxxi. 2.

493493 Matt. v. 12.

494494 Comp. 1 Pet. iv. 14.

495495 Isa. vi. 1; Ps. cx. 1.

496496 Dan. vii. 13.

497497 Zech. xii. 10.

498498 Luke xviii. 8. There is nothing to correspond with “putas” in the received text.

499499 2 Thess. i. 6–8.

500500 Matt. iii. 12.

501501 Matt. xxv. 41.

502502 2 Thess. i. 9, 10.

503503 Ps. xlv. 2.

504504 Ps. xlv. 7.

505505 Ps. xlv. 3, 4.

506506 Jer. xvii. 9 (Sept.). Harvey here remarks: “The LXX. read vwna

instead of vna



. Thus, from a text that teaches us that the heart is deceitful above all things, the Fathers extract a proof of the manhood of Christ.”

507507 Isa. viii. 3, ix. 6, vii. 14. [A confusion of texts.]

508508 Joel iii. 16.

509509 Ps. lxxvi. 1.

510510 Hab. iii. 3.

511511 See III. xx. 4.

512512 Isa. xxxv. 5, 6.

513513 Isa. xxxv. 3.

514514 Isa. xxvi. 19.

515515 Isa. liii. 4.

516516 Isa. liii. 3.

517517 Zech. ix. 9.

518518 Isa. l. 6.

519519 Isa. liii. 7.

520520 Ps. lxix. 21.

521521 Ps. xxxviii. 11.

522522 Isa. lxv. 2.

523523 Ps. xxii. 7.

524524 Ps. xxii. 18.

525525 Ps. xxii. 15.

526526 Comp. book iii. cap. 4 and book iv. cap xxii. 1.

527527 Amos viii. 9, 10.

528528 Jer. xv. 9.

529529 Ps. iii. 5.

530530 Ps. xxiv. 7.

531531 Ps. xix. 6.

532532 Ps. xcix. 1.

533533 Matt. xxiv. 21.

534534 Or “son.”

535535 Isa. l. 8, 9 (loosely quoted).

536536 Isa. ii. 17.

537537 Jer. xxxi. 31, 32.

538538 Ezek. xxxvi. 26.

539539 Isa. xliii. 19–21.

540540 Matt. ix. 17.

541541 Rom. ii. 5.

542542 1 Cor. ii. 15.

543543 “Ex alia et alia substantia fuisse prophetias.”

544544 1 Pet. i. 12.

545545 Rom. iii. 21.

546546 Matt. v. 17, 18.

547547 Rom. i. 17.

548548 Hab. ii. 4.

549549 Isa. ii. 3, 4; Mic. iv. 2, 3.

550550 Matt. v. 39.

551551 Book 1. p. 327, this volume.

552552 This is following Harvey’s conjectural emendation of the text, viz., “taleis” for “talis.” He considers the pins here as symbolical of the nails by which our Lord was fastened to the cross. The whole passage is almost hopelessly obscure, though the general meaning maybe guessed.

553553 Isa. lvii. 1.

554554 [If it be remembered that we know Irenaeus here, only through a most obscure Latin rendering, we shall be slow to censure this conclusion.]

555555 Luke v. 36, 37.

556556 Book i. p. 334, this volume.

557557 Illorum; following the Greek form of the comparative degree.

558558 Matt. xxi. 33–41.

559559 Matt. xxi. 42–44.

560560 Matt. v. 22.

561561 Jer. vii. 3; Zech. vii. 9, 10, viii. 17; Isa. i. 17–19.

562562 Ps. xxxiv. 13, 14.

563563 Jer. vii. 29, 30.

564564 Jer. vi. 17, 18.

565565 Luke xxi. 34, 35.

566566 Luke xii. 35, 36.

567567 Luke xvii. 26, etc.

568568 Matt. xxiv. 42.

569569 No other of the Greek Fathers quotes this text as above; from which fact Grabe infers that old Latin translator, or his transcribers, altered the words of Irenaeus [N.B.—From one example infer the rest.] to suit the Latin versions.

570570 Matt. xi. 23, 24.

571571 John iv. 14.

572572 This is Massuet’s conjectural emendation of the text, viz.,


Share with your friends:
1   ...   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page