Ante-nicene fathers



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88 So the Greek. The Latin reads: “which he also handed down to the Church.”

99 Tit. iii. 10.

1010 ianwtath. Harvey translates this all-sufficient, and thus paraphrases: But his Epistle is all-sufficient, to teach those that are desirous to learn.

1111 Rev. xxii. 17.

1212 Latin, “modica quaestione.”

1313 [The uneducated barbarians must receive the Gospel on testimony. Irenaeus puts apostolic traditions, genuine and uncorrupt, in this relation to the primary authority of the written word. 2 Thess. ii. 15, iii. 6.]

1414 Literally, “without letters;” equivalent to, “without paper and ink,” a few lines previously.

1515 The old Latin translation says the eighth bishop; but there is no discrepancy. Eusebius, who has preserved the Greek of this passage, probably counted the apostles as the first step in the episcopal succession. As Irenaeus tells us in the preceding chapter, Linus is to be counted as the first bishop.

1616 It is thought that this does not mean excommunication properly so called, but a species of self-excommunication, i.e., anticipating the sentence of the Church, by quitting it altogether. See Valesius’s note in his edition of Eusebius.

1717 John xiv. 6.

1818 Ps. lxxxv. 11.

1919 Luke v. 31, 32.

2020 Eph. ii. 17.

2121 Gen. ix. 27.

2222 Ps. cx. 1.

2323 Gen. xix. 24.

2424 Ps. xlv. 6.

2525 Ps. lxxxii. 1.

2626 Ps. l.1.

2727 Ps. l.3.

2828 Isa. lxv. 1.

2929 Ps. lxxxii. 6.

3030 Rom. iii. 14.

3131 Ex. iii. 14.

3232 Ex. iii. 8.

3333 Isa. xliii. 10.

3434 Ps. xcvi. 5.

3535 Ps. lxxxi. 9.

3636 These words are an interpolation: it is supposed they have been carelessly repeated from the preceding quotation of Isaiah.

3737 Isa. xliv. 9.

3838 Jer. x. 11.

3939 Literally, “In both houghs,” in ambabus suffraginibus.

4040 The old Latin translation has, “Si unus est Dominus Deus”—If the Lord God is one; which is supposed by the critics to have occurred through carelessness of the translator.

4141 1 Kings xviii. 21, etc.

4242 The Latin version has, “that answereth to-day” (hodie),—an evident error for igne.

4343 1 Kings xviii. 36.

4444 Gal. iv. 8, 9.

4545 2 Thess. ii. 4.

4646 1 Cor. viii. 4, etc.

4747 Deut. v. 8.

4848 Deut. iv. 19.

4949 Ex. vii. 1.

5050 Heb. iii. 5; Num. xii. 7.

5151 2 Cor. iv. 4.

5252 This is according to the reading of the old Italic version, for it is not so read in any of our existing manuscripts of the Greek New Testament.

5353 Gal. iii. 19.

5454 This world is not found in the second quotation of this passage immediatley following.

5555 This world is not found in the second quotation of this passage immediatley following.

5656 2 Thess. ii. 8.

5757 Matt. xxii. 21.

5858 Matt. vi. 24.

5959 John viii. 34.

6060 A word of which many explanations have been proposed, but none are quite satisfactory. Harvey seems inclined to suspect the reading to be corrupt, through the ignorance and carelessness of the copyist. [Irenaeus undoubtedly relied for Hebrew criticisms on some incompetent retailer of rabbinical refinements.]

6161 Matt. xii. 29.

6262 Jer. xxxi. 11.

6363 John i. 3.

6464 Ps. xxxiii. 6.

6565 Ps. cxv. 3.

6666 Gen. xv. 5.

6767 Rom. ix. 25.

6868 Matt. iii. 7.

6969 Matt. iii. 3.

7070 Matt. i. 20.

7171 Matt. ii. 15.

7272 Matt. i. 23.

7373 Ps. cxxxii. 11.

7474 Ps. lxxvi. 1.

7575 Num. xxiv. 17.

7676 Matt. ii. 2.

7777 Luke i. 33.

7878 Ps. lxxvi. 1.

7979 Isa. lxv. 1. [A beautiful idea for poets and orators, but not to be pressed dogmatically.]

8080 Matt. iii. 16.

8181 This is after the version of the Septuagint, ou kata thn doxan: but the word doxa may have the meaning opinio as well as gloria. If this be admitted here, the passage would bear much the same sense as it does in the authorized version, “He shall not judge after the sight of His eyes.”

8282 Isa. xi. 1, etc.

8383 Isa. lxi. 1.

8484 This is according to the Syriac Peschito version.

8585 John ii. 25.

8686 Prov. v. 22.

8787 Luke i. 6.

8888 Literally, “that he should place the incense.” The next clause is most likely an interpolation for the sake of explanation.

8989 Luke i. 8, etc.

9090 Luke i. 15, etc.

9191 Matt. xi. 9, 11.

9292 Ps. lviii. 3.

9393 Luke i. 26, etc.

9494 Luke i. 32.

9595 Luke i. 46.

9696 Luke i. 78.

9797 “Ascriberet Deo”—make the property of God.

9898 Rom. iii. 30.

9999 Luke i. 68, etc.

100100 Luke i. 76.

101101 Harvey observes that the Syriac, agreeing with the Latin here, expresses priority in point of time; but our translation, without reason, makes it the precedence of honour, viz., was preferred before me. The Greek is, prwto" mou.

102102 John i. 29, 15, 16.

103103 Gen. xlix. 18.

104104 Isa. xii. 2.

105105 Ps. xcviii. 2.

106106 Lam. iv. 20, after LXX.

107107 John i. 14.

108108 Luke ii. 11, etc.

109109 Thus found also in the Vulgate. Harvey supposes that the original of Irenaeus read according to our textus receptus, and that the Vulgate rendering was adopted in this passage by the transcribers of the Latin version of our author. [No doubt a just remark.] There can be no doubt, however, that the reading eudokia" is supported by many and weighty ancient authorities. [But on this point see the facts as given by Burgon, in his refutation of the rendering adopted by late revisers, Revision Revised, p. 41. London, Murray, 1883.]

110110 Ps. cxxiv. 8.

111111 Ps. xcv. 4.

112112 Luke ii. 20.

113113 Luke ii. 22.

114114 Luke ii. 29, etc.

115115 Luke ii. 38.

116116 The text seems to be corrupt in the old Latin translation. The rendering here follows Harvey’s conjectural restoration of the original Greek of the passage.

117117 The Greek of this passage in St. Mark [i. 2] reads, ta" tribou", i.e., His paths, which varies from the Hebrew original, to which the text of Irenaeus seems to revert, unless indeed his copy of the Gospels contained the reading of the Codex Bezae. [See book iii. cap. xii. 3, 14, below; also, xiv. 2 and xxiii. 3. On this Codex, see Burgon, Revision Revised, p. 12, etc., and references.]

118118 Luke i. 17.

119119 See ii. 35, 3.

120120 Mark xvi. 19.

121121 Ps. cx. 1.

122122 Irenaeus frequently quotes this text, and always uses the punctuation here adopted. Tertullian and many others of the Fathers follow his example.

123123 John i. 1., etc.

124124 See ii. 1, etc.

125125 John i. 10, 11.

126126 John i. 14.

127127 John i. 14.

128128 John i. 6.

129129 Mal. iii. 1.

130130 Luke i. 17.

131131 This evidently refers to 1 Kings xviii. 36, where Elijah invokes God as the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, etc.

132132 Matt. xi. 9; Luke vii. 26.

133133 1 Cor. xii. 28.

134134 The transition here is so abrupt, that some critics suspect the loss of part of the text before these words.

135135 John ii. 3.

136136 John vi. 11.

137137 John i. 18.

138138 John i. 47.

139139 The reading neiko" having been followed instead of niko", victory.

140140 John i. 49, vi. 69; Matt. xii. 18.

141141 Harvey thinks that this is the Hebrew Gospel of which Irenaeus speaks in the opening of this book; but comp. Dr. Robert’s Discussions on the Gospels, part ii. chap. iv.

142142 Literally, “four catholic spirits;” Greek, tessara kaqolika pneumata: Latin, “quatuor principales spiritus.”

143143 1 Tim. iii. 15.

144144 Ps. lxxx. 1.

145145 Rev. iv. 7.

146146 John i. 1.

147147 The above is the literal rendering of this very obscure sentence; it is not at all represented in the Greek here preserved.

148148 The Greek is uper: the Latin, “pro.”

149149 Matt. 1. 1, 18.

150150 The Greek text of this clause, literally rendered, is, “This Gospel, then, is anthropomorphic.”

151151 Or, “a sacredotal and liturgical order,” following the fragment of the Greek text recovered here. Harvey thinks that the old Latin “actum” indicates the true reading of the original praxin, and that taxin is an error. The earlier editors, however, are of a contrary opinion.

152152 That is, the appearance of the Gospel taken as a whole; it being presented under a fourfold aspect.

153153 A portion of the Greek has been preserved here, but it differs materially from the old Latin version, which seems to represent the original with greater exactness, and has therefore been followed. The Greek represents the first covenant as having been given to Noah, at the deluge, under the sign of the rainbow; the second as that given to Abraham, under the sign of circumcision; the third, as being the giving of the law, under Moses; and the fourth, as that of the Gospel, through our Lord Jesus Christ. [Paradise with the tree of life, Adam with Shechinah (Gen. iii. 24, iv. 16), Noah with the rainbow, Abraham with circumcision, Moses with the ark, Messiah with the sacraments, and heaven with the river of life, seem the complete system.]

154154 The old Latin reads, “partem gloriatur se habere Evangelii.” Massuet changed partem into pariter, thinking that partem gave a sense inconsistent with the Marcionite curtailment of St. Luke. Harvey, however, observes: “But the Gospel, here means the blessings of the Gospel, in which Marcion certainly claimed a share.”

155155 John xiv. 16, etc.

156156 Slighting, as did some later heretics, the Pauline Epistles.

157157 1 Cor. xi. 4, 5.

158158 Matt. xii. 31.

159159 Acts i. 16, etc.

160160 Ps. lxix. 25.

161161 Ps. cix. 8.

162162 Joel ii. 28.

163163 Ps. xv. 8.

164164 Acts ii. 22–27.

165165 The word dwron or dwrhma is supposed by some to have existed in the earliest Greek texts, although not found in any extant now. It is thus quoted by others besides Irenaeus.

166166 Acts ii. 30–37.

167167 Acts ii. 37, 38.

168168 Acts iii. 6, etc.

169169 These interpolations are also found in the Codex Bexae.

170170 These interpolations are also found in the Codex Bexae.

171171 These interpolations are also found in the Codex Bexae.

172172 “Et veniant” in Latin text: opw" an elqwsin in Greek. The translation of these Greek words by “when . . . come,” is one of the most glaring errors in the authorized English version.

173173 Irenaeus, like the majority of the early authorities, manifestly read prokeceirismenon instead of prokekhrugmenon, as in textus receptus.

174174 Dispositionis.

175175 Acts iii. 12, etc.

176176 Acts iv. 2.

177177 Acts iv. 8, etc.

178178 Acts iv. 22.

179179 These words, though not in textus receptus, are found in some ancient mss.MSS;. and versions; but not the words “our father,” which follow.

180180 “In hac civitate” are words not represented in the textus receptus, but have a place in all modern critical editions of the New Testament.

181181 Acts iv. 24, etc.

182182 Acts iv. 31.

183183 The Latin is, “ut convertat se unusquisque.”

184184 Acts iv. 33.

185185 This is following Grabe’s emendation of the text. The old Latin reads “gloria sua,” the translator having evidently mistaken dexia for doxh.

186186 Acts v. 30.

187187 Acts v. 42.

188188 These words have apparently been omitted through inadvertence.

189189 Acts x. 1–5.

190190 Acts x. 15.

191191 Acts x. 34, 35.

192192 Acts x. 37–44.

193193 Quemadmodum capiebat; perhaps, “just as it presented itself to him.”

194194 Acts viii. 32; Isa. liii. 7, 8.

195195 Acts viii. 37.

196196 Acts ix. 20.

197197 Phil. ii. 8.

198198 Latin translation, tractatur; which Harvey thinks affords a conclusive proof that Irenaeus occasionally quotes Scripture by re-translating from the Syriac.

199199 It will be observed that Scripture is here very loosely quoted.

200200 Acts xvii. 24, etc.

201201 Deut. xxxii. 8 [LXX.].

202202 Deut. xxxii. 9.

203203 Acts xiv. 15–17.

204204 Acts vii. 2–8.

205205 Book ii. ch. xxx. 2.

206206 1 Tim. vi. 4.

207207 No reference is made to this promised work in the writings of his successors. Probably it never was undertaken.

208208 Most of the mss. read “intolerabiliorem,” but one reads as above, and is followed by all the editors.

209209 Acts vii. 56.

210210 Hos. xii. 10.

211211 Acts xv. 15, etc.

212212 Irenaeus manifestly read outw" for toutw, and in this he agrees with Codex Bezae. We may remark, once for all, that in the variations from the received text of the New Testament which occur in our author, his quotations are very often in accordance with the readings of the Cambridge ms.

213213 Amos ix. 11, 12.

214214 This addition is also found in Codex Bezae, and in Cyprian and others.

215215 Acts xv. 14, etc.

216216 Another addition, also found in the Codex Bezae, and in Tertullian.

217217 Acts x. 28, 29.

218218 Acts x. 47.

219219 Gal. ii. 12, 13.

220220 Gal. ii. 8.
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