Ante-nicene fathers



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4848 Literally, “perfected.”

4949 Literally, “drove Adam out of.”

5050 Zech. iii. 1.

5151 Luke xxii. 31.

5252 Eph. ii. 2.

5353 Luke xxii. 32.

5454 The reading is peri in the one case, and meta in the other, though the latter meaning seems preferable. Most of the mss. of the longer recension read peri, as in the shorter.

5555 Or, “command.”

5656 Or, “firm.”

5757 Or, “firm.”

5858 Or, “firm.”

5959 Some refer the words to the Lord’s Supper.

6060 Or, “finally.”

6161 Literally, “to know.”

6262 Ps. vi. 5.

6363 Isa. lxii. 11.

6464 Prov. xxiv. 21.

6565 Comp. Heb. x. 29.

6666 Or, “great.”

6767 Matt. x. 41.

6868 Or, “deacons.”

6969 comp. Epistle of Ignatius to Ephesians, chap. xxi.; to Polycarp, chap. ii. vi.

7070 Or, “deacons.”

7171 2 Tim. i. 18.

7272 comp. Epistle of Ignatius to Ephesians, chap. xxi.; to Polycarp, chap. ii. vi.

7373 Literally, “most becoming of God.”

7474 Or, “from any conscience.”

7575 Literally, “God-ambassador.”

7676 Or, “having received.”

7777 Literally, “body.”

7878 Literally, “may glorify with him.”

7979 Or, “think of.”

8080 Literally, “God-ambassador.”

8181 Literally, “body.”

8282 Or, “think of.”

8383 Or, “the ministry.”

8484 Literally, “worthy of God.”

8585 Literally, “most becoming of God.”

8686 Literally, “in the union of God and of you.”

8787 The deaconesses seem to have been called widows.

8888 Literally, “the name desired of me.”

8989 Literally, “the name desired of me.”

11 i.e., to make personal acquaintance with one esteemed so highly.

22 Or, “tolerate.”

33 Comp. 1 Thess. v. 17.

44 Some read, “according to thy practice.”

55 i.e., to make personal acquaintance with one esteemed so highly.

66 Or, “tolerate.”

77 Comp. 1 Thess. v. 17.

88 Some read, “according to thy practice.”

99 Matt. viii.17.

1010 Literally, “paroxysms by embrocations.”

1111 Matt. x. 16.

1212 Literally, “flatter.”

1313 Some refer this to the mysteries of God and others to things yet future.

1414 Comp. Epistle of Ignatius to the Ephesians, chap. xxi., etc.

1515 Literally, “paroxysms by embrocations.”

1616 Matt. x. 16.

1717 Comp. Epistle of Ignatius to the Ephesians, chap. xxi., etc.

1818 Comp. 1 Tim. i. 3, vi. 3.

1919 Literally, “great.”

2020 Comp. 1 Tim. i. 3, vi. 3.

2121 Literally, “great.”

2222 The word in the original (frontisth") denotes one who thinks or cares for another.

2323 Some refer the words to more frequent meetings, and others to these meetings being more numerous; no comparison is necessarily implied.

2424 i.e., so as to bring them out to the public assembly.

2525 Or, “act the part of slaves.”

2626 Some refer the words to more frequent meetings, and others to these meetings being more numerous; no comparison is necessarily implied.

2727 i.e., so as to bring them out to the public assembly.

2828 Or, “act the part of slaves.”

2929 Some insert mh, and render, “rather do not even speak of them.”

3030 Eph. v. 25.

3131 i.e., in celibacy.

3232 Some render, “to the honour of the flesh of the Lord,” as in the longer recension.

3333 Comp. 1 Cor. x. 31.

3434 i.e., in celibacy.

3535 Literally, “if he be known beyond the bishop.”

3636 Comp. 1 Cor. x. 31.

3737 As this Epistle, though sent to the bishop, was meant to be read to the people, Ignatius here directly addresses them.

3838 Comp. chap. ii. etc.

3939 Or, “assessors.”

4040 A military reference, simply implying the idea of faithful effort leading to future reward.

4141 Comp. Ignatius’ Epistle to the Ephesians, chap. ii.

4242 As this Epistle, though sent to the bishop, was meant to be read to the people, Ignatius here directly addresses them.

4343 Comp. chap. ii. etc.

4444 Or, “assessors.”

4545 Literally, “worthy of God.”

4646 Comp. Ignatius’ Epistle to the Ephesians, chap. ii.

4747 Literally, “in freedom from care of God.”

4848 Some read, “in the resurrection.”

4949 Literally, “most befitting God.”

5050 Literally, “God-runner.”

5151 Literally, “at leisure for.”

5252 Literally, “to Him.”

5353 Literally, “in freedom from care of God.”

5454 Literally, “most befitting God.”

5555 Literally, “God-runner.”

5656 Literally, “at leisure for.”

5757 Some suppose the reference to be to the soldiers, or perhaps to God Himself.

5858 Or, “as possessed of the judgment.”

5959 Literally, “men on foot.”

6060 Some have the plural “ye” here.

6161 Literally, “an eternal work.”

6262 Some propose to read, “and of the bishop.”

6363 Literally, “name desired by me.”

6464 Some suppose the reference to be to the soldiers, or perhaps to God Himself.

6565 Or, “as possessed of the judgment.”

6666 Literally, “an eternal work.”

6767 Literally, “name desired by me.”

6868 See the extraordinary passage and note in his Hippolytus, vol. i. p. 58, etc.

11 The inscription varies in each of the three Syriac mss., being in the first, “The Epistle of my lord Ignatius, the bishop;” in the second, “The Epistle of Ignatius;” and in the third, “The Epistle of Ignatius, bishop of Antioch.”

22 For “vindicate thy place” in the Greek.

33 Literally, “draw out thy spirit.”

44 Cureton observes, as one alternative here, that “the Syrian translator seems to have read paraxusma for paroxusmou".”

55 Or, “flatter,” probably meaning to “deal gently with.”

66 Thus the Syriac renders antiyucon in the Greek.

77 The Greek has akmwn, “an anvil.”

88 The Greek has meta, “after.”

99 Or, “constant,” “regular.”

1010 i.e., “in celibacy.”

1111 Or, “corrupted himself.”

1212 Literally, “make the contest.”

1313 Literally, “sons of His house.”

1414 These are the only parts of chaps. vii. and vi. in the Greek that are represented in the Syriac.

1515 These are the only parts of chaps. vii. and vi. in the Greek that are represented in the Syriac.

11 Another inscription is, “Epistle the Second, which is to the Ephesians.”

22 Literally, “separated.”

33 Literally, “bound for actions.”

44 Cureton renders, “have received your abundance,” probably referring the words to gifts sent by the Ephesians to Ignatius.

55 Literally, “be in his image.”

66 There is no Apodosis, unless it be found in what follows.

77 The following clause is the whole of chap. iii. in the Greek, which is represented in the Syriac.

88 Chaps. iv. v. vi. vii. of the Greek are totally omitted in the Syriac.

99 Thus Cureton renders the words, referring in confirmation to the Peshito version of Phil. i. 4, but the meaning is doubtful.

1010 Chaps. xi. xii. xiii. of the Greek are totally wanting in the Syriac, and only these few words of chaps. xiv. and xv. are represented.

1111 The meaning seems to be that mere profession, without continuous practice, is nothing.

1212 Chaps. xvi. and xvii. of the Greek are totally wanting in the Syriac.

1313 Literally, “the mysteries of the shout.” The meaning is here confused and obscure. See the Greek.

1414 Chaps. xx. and xxi. of the Greek are altogether wanting in the Syriac.[N.B.—See spurious Epistle to Philippians, cap. 4, infra. This concealment from Satan of the mystery of the incarnation in the explanation, according to the Fathers, of his tempting the Messiah, and prompting His crucifixion. Also, Christ the more profoundly humbled himself, “ne subtilis ille diabolioculus magnum hoc pietatis deprehenderet sacramentum” (St. Bernard, opp. ii. 1944). Bernard also uses this opinion very strikingly (opp. ii. 1953) in one of his sermons, supposing that Satan discovered the secret too late for his own purpose, and then prompted the outcry, Come down from the cross, to defeat the triumph of the second Adam. (Comp. St. Mark i. 24 and St. Luke iv. 34, where, after the first defeat of the tempter, this demon suspects the second Adam, and tries to extort the secret).]

11 Another inscription is, “The Third Epistle.”

22 Literally, “in life.”

33 The meaning is probably similar to that expressed in chap. xiv. of the Epistle in Ephesians.

44 Literally, “I am ground.”

55 Literally, “with provoking, provoke.”

66 Literally, “they are who are.”

77 Literally, “by their injury.”

88 Literally, “and not as that which is afraid of some other men.” So Cureton translates, but remarks that the passage is evidently corrupt. The reference plainly is to the fact that the beasts sometimes refused to attack their intended victims. See the case of Blandina, as reported by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., v. 1.).

99 Cureton renders interrogatively, “What is expedient for me?” and remarks that “the meaning of the Syriac appears to be, ‘I crave your indulgence to leave the knowledge of what is expedient for me to my own conscience._0’”

1010 Literally, “nothing.”

1111 Literally, “and.”

1212 The Latin version translates the Greek here, “He adds gain to me.”

1313 Chap. viii. of the Greek is entirely omitted in the Syriac.

1414 The following passage is not found in this Epistle in the Greek recensions, but forms, in substance, chaps. iv. and v. of the Epistle to the Trallians. Diverse views are held by critics as to its proper place, according to the degree of authority they ascribe to the Syriac version. Cureton maintains that this passage has been transferred by fabrication by introducing a part of the genuine writing of Ignatius; while Hefele asserts that it is bound by the “closest connection” to the preceding chapter in the Epistle to the Trallians.

1515 Or, as in the Greek, “Fare ye well, to the end.”[N.B.—The aphoristic genius of Ignatius seems to be felt by his Syrian abbreviator, who reduces whole chapters to mere maxims.]

1616 [Spurious writings, if they can be traced to antiquity, are always useful. Sometimes they are evidence of facts, always of opinions, ideas and fancies of their date; and often they enable us to identify the origin of corruptions. Even interpolations prove what later partisans would be glad to find, if they could, in early writers. They bear unwilling testimony to the absence of genuine evidence in favour of their assumptions.]

11 Acts xx. 24.

22 1 Cor. xvi. 13.

33 Hab. ii. 4; Gal. iii. 11.

44 Ps. lxviii. 7 (after the LXX).

55 some omit this.

66 That is, as appears afterwards from chap. v., so as to have no personality distinct from the Father.

77 The translation is here somewhat doubtful.

88 Gal. ii. 5.

99 Rom. xv. 19.

1010 Gal. vi. 17.

1111 Gal. vi. 14.

1212 Acts xxvi. 23 (somewhat inaccurately rendered in English version).

1313 Rom. vi. 10.

1414 Col. i. 15.

1515 1 Cor. viii. 6.

1616 1 Tim. ii. 5.

1717 Col. i. 16, 17.

1818 John xx. 17.

1919 1 Cor. xv. 28.

2020 John i. 3.

2121 Prov. viii. 27, 30.

2222 Ps. cx. 1.

2323 John viii. 58.

2424 John xvii. 5.

2525 John vi. 38.

2626 John i. 9, 10, 11.

2727 John i. 1.

2828 Some insert here John i. 3.

2929 Prov. viii. 22, 23, 25.

3030 John v. 25, 28.

3131 1 Cor. xv. 53.

3232 1 Cor. vi. 9.

3333 1 Cor. xv. 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 32.

3434 Literally, “coming also to the appetite of those things after eating.” The text is doubtful.

3535 Rom. xiii. 14.

3636 Eph. vi. 4.

3737 Literally, “of the Philippians.”

3838 1 Pet. v. 14.

11 Comp. Acts xi. 26.

22 Literally, “in the Lord.”

33 Eph. iv. 1.

44 Deut vi. 4; Mark xii. 29.

55 Gen. xix. 24.

66 The ms. has “Lord.”

77 Gen. i. 26, 27.

88 Gen. v. 1, ix. 6.

99 Deut. xviii. 15; Acts iii. 22, vii. 37.

1010 Literally, “after these things.”

1111 Isa. xliv. 6.

1212 Isa. ix. 6.

1313 Isa. vii. 14; Matt. i. 23.

1414 Isa. liii. 7; Jer. xi. 19.

1515 John xvii. 3.

1616 John i. 1.

1717 John i. 14.

1818 Matt. i. 1.

1919 1 Cor. viii. 4, 6; Gal. iii. 20.

2020 Eph. iv. 5, 6; 1 Tim. ii. 5.

2121 1 Tim. ii. 5.

2222 Comp. John vi. 70. Some read, “the son of the devil.”

2323 Or, “that cannot be known.”

2424 Comp. 1 John ii. 22, iv. 3; 2 John 7.

2525 Jer. xvii. 5.

2626 Phil. iii. 18, 19.

2727 The text is here doubtful.

2828 Literally, “fox-like thoes,” lynxes being perhaps intended.

2929 Some think that this is the same person as the Euodias referred to by St. Paul, Phil. iv. 2; but, as appears from the Greek (ver. 3, aitine"), the two persons there mentioned were women.

3030 1 Cor. xvi. 22.

3131 Comp. 1 Cor. iv. 16.
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