Annotated Bibliography Primary Sources: (9)



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Annotated Bibliography

Primary Sources: (9)



Car Used by Ernesto Miranda. Digital image. Black Talk Radio Network. N.p., 16 Mar. 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2013.This image is a primary source because it was taken during the time of Miranda's case. It shows the car that Miranda used when attacking and raping his victim. It helps to provide interesting visuals to the website when explaining Miranda’s crime and arrest.

Court, U.S. Supreme. "Miranda v. Arizona." Civil Rights in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. U.S. History in Context. Web. 20 Nov. 2013. This is a primary source where Mr. Chief Justice Warren gave his opinion in court on the Miranda v. Arizona trial. This is useful because, since it is a primary source, it gives insight as to what the Supreme Court thought on the issue when it actually happened. The source provides a better explanation of the Supreme Court's reasoning behind their decision, which is helpful in the website section about the verdict.



Lineup of Suspects. Digital image. Black Talk Radio Network. N.p., 16 Mar. 2011. Web. 9

Dec. 2013.This image is a primary source because it was taken during the time of Miranda's case. It shows the lineup of the potential suspects in the attack and rape of Jameson, including Ernesto Miranda. It provides interesting visuals to the website in the section explaining Miranda’s arrest and interrogation.

Miranda and Attorney John J. Flynn. Digital image. ABA Journal. N.p., 1 Sept. 2010. Web.

9 Dec. 2013.This image is a primary source because it was taken during Miranda's trial. It shows him sitting next to one of his lawyers, John J. Flynn, while in court. It is useful in providing interesting visuals to the section of the website describing the trial.

Mug Shot of Ernesto Miranda. N.d. Photograph. Web. 8 Dec. 2013. This picture is a primary source because it was taken in the time period of Miranda and his case. It is a mug shot of Miranda that was taken when he was arrested. This is helpful because having a picture of what he looked like gives additional insight to the story of his case, and helps the viewers of the website to more thoroughly appreciate the information about him and his case.

Supreme Court Justices. Digital image. Black Talk Radio Network. N.p., 16 Mar. 2011. Web. 9 Dec. 2013.This image is a primary source because it was taken during the time of Miranda's case. It shows the nine Supreme Court justices who produced the verdict for the Miranda decision. It helps to provide interesting visuals to the website in the section explaining the trial.

“The Bill of Rights”. The actual transcript of the Bill of Rights will be extremely helpful because it can be directly cited when quoting the rights of the accused. It is especially helpful in the section of the website that discusses the rights of the accused prior to the case.

“The Constitution of the United States of America”. The actual transcript of the Constitution will be extremely helpful because it can be directly cite it when quoting the rights of the accused. It is especially helpful in the section of the website that discusses the rights of the accused prior to the case

Warren, Chief Justice Earl. "Today's Document from the National Archives." National Archives. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec. 2013. This primary source is an image of the original document of Chief Justice Earl Warren’s opinion on the Miranda v. Arizona court case. He basically says that, what are now called Miranda rights, are necessary. On the website, this helps to provide a better explanation of the Supreme Court's reasoning behind their decision, in the section about the verdict.

Secondary Sources: (23)

Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. "Facts and Case Summary." United States Courts. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2013. This is a report of the Miranda v. Arizona court case along with the three other court cases that were involved in the decision. It gives a summary of each specific case, as well as explaining the issues that it deals with, and thus relates the overall court case to the Fifth Amendment and our rights as citizens of the United States. This information appears in the section of the website about the actual crimes and trials that led to the formation of the Miranda rights.



Beatty, Gary D. "The Allegory Of The Cave! (Statistical Studies of the Impact of the Miranda Decision on Law Enforcement) » Publications » The Federalist Society." The Federalist Society. N.p., 1 Aug. 1999. Web. 01 Jan. 2014. This article provides information about the effect of the Miranda decision on the ability of police officers to properly convict criminals. It is extremely useful, as it provides opinions both from people who believed that it damaged law enforcement, as well as from people who believed that it had no impact on law enforcement. This information is found in the long-term effects section of the website.

Cancian, Jennifer. Personal Interview. 12 Jan. 2014. Jennifer Cancian has been a lawyer for several years, and is therefore quite knowledgeable about the procedures of a typical court trial. She was able to share information about the extent to which she believes the Miranda warning has prevented her from or helped her towards convicting criminals. This information is useful in understanding the long-term effects of the verdict.

"Criminal Justice." Civil Rights in America: 1500 to the present. Ed. Jay A. Sigler. Detroit: Gale, 1998. U.S. History in Context. Web. 20 Nov. 2013. This is a secondary source that is divided up by the different rights of the accused; in each section it gives examples of these rights being used and the background information, such as where the right can be found in the Constitution. This is very helpful to use as extra examples of the rights of the accused for clarification and application purposes, as well as being more specific when explaining each individual right. The information from this online article appears in the section in our website about the rights that accused Americans already possessed prior to the Miranda decision.

"Fundamental Rights of the Accused." Get Legal. The Attorney Store, 2013. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. This secondary source is a website that is written to the public to inform them of the legal codes in the United States. It lists and describes the amendments that have to do with the rights of the accused and explains the rights that they are given. It is helpful because it gives clear explanations of each amendment, and it is useful for defining which amendments had to do with legal rights. This is helpful in explaining the causes of the case, because it explains the rights that Miranda had, from the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Gribben, Mark. "Miranda vs Arizona: The Crime That Changed American Justice." Web log post. Crime Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2013. This article gives a very detailed description of what happened to Ernesto Miranda and his victim that lead to the court case, as well as what happened during and after the case. This is helpful because it gives insight into what actually happened during the court case itself. This information helped in giving a solid explanation of the case itself in the section of the website about the crime and trial.



Hogrogian, John G. Miranda v. Arizona: The Rights of the Accused. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 1999. Print. This book provides a detailed explanation of before, during, and after the case, and thus, is extremely useful to us in all sections of the website. It covers practically everything we are interested in researching, and serves as a good jumping-off point for topics that we researched more extensively. This book also includes many interesting primary source photographs that provided ideas about what kinds of images could be added to the website. The author, John Hogrogian, is a lawyer who frequently argues appeals in the courts of New York State.

"Key Excerpts from the Dissenting Opinion." Street Law, Inc. Landmark Cases of the U.S. Supreme Court, n.d. Web. 29 Dec. 2013. This article consists of a number of quotations directly from the majority dissenting opinion from the trial. It is extremely useful in understanding why the dissenting Supreme Court justices disagreed with the verdict of the trial, and gives one a better understanding of how people felt about the verdict during this time period. This information is found in the short-term effects section of the website, where the criticisms of the verdict are explained.

Levenson, Laurie L. "Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966)." Encyclopedia of the Supreme Court of the United States. Ed. David S. Tanenhaus. Vol. 3. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2008. 300-301. U.S. History in Context. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. This article describes how the Miranda v. Arizona trial led to the creation of "Miranda" rights, which dramatically affected the United States Law Enforcement system. It also explains some of the criticisms of this decision, and how the law changed in response to these criticisms. It was written by Laurie L. Levenson, who was a lawyer in Los Angeles for eight years, and is now a professor of law at Loyola Law School. This source is useful in seeing different perspectives on the case, which will help in the creation of the website section about the short-term effects of the Miranda verdict.

McBride, Alex. "Landmark Cases: Miranda v. Arizona (1966)." Dec. 2006. PBS. 14 Nov. 2013. This online article is a secondary source that gives a more in-depth description of the facts of the Miranda v. Arizona case, as well as the effect that this case had on American’s rights today. It was written by Alex McBride, who is a third year law student at Tulane Law School, and is the recipient of the 2005 Ray Forrester Award in Constitutional Law. This article is helpful in providing a thorough description of the actual trial, as well as the long-term effects of the trial.

Minnesota Center for Community Legal Education. "Guide to Understanding the Rights of the Accused under the Bill of Rights." N.p., 2001. Web. 2 Dec. 2013. This source lists and explains the different rights of the accused, in a very detailed and thorough way. It is not the most unique source, because many other sources also prove information about these rights, but it expands on the rights more so than the other sources do. This is helpful in writing about the causes of Miranda v. Arizona by explaining what the citizens rights were limited to, prior to the case.

"Miranda v. Arizona and Criminal Defense: Facts and Case Summary." United States Courts. Web. 14 Nov. 2013. This source is a secondary source that gives a detailed description of the Miranda v. Arizona case, as well as the three other cases involved in this decision. It contains many direct quotes from the Supreme Court holding, which helps to provide a better understanding the Supreme Court's decision on the issue. It is very useful in understanding the basic facts of the other three trials, since most other sources do not provide a description of them; they only mentioned that they occurred. This information is found in the section of the website about the crimes themselves.

"Miranda v. Arizona (redirected from Vignera v. New York)." TheFreeDictionary.com. The Gale Group, Inc., 2008. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. This online article provides insight on the unjustness of law enforcement officers prior to the formation of the rights of the accused. It also explains how the issue arose in the Supreme Court during the Miranda v. Arizona trial, as well as the significance of this case. It is helpful in learning about the rights of Americans prior to the case, and how the case changed these rights, which appears in both the causes and effects sections of the website.

Prentzas, G. S. Miranda Rights: Protecting the Rights of the Accused. New York, NY: Rosen Pub. Group, 2006. Print. This book provides a clear description of the Miranda v. Arizona trial, as well as a few lengthy chapters about the effect and future of the decision. It is especially useful for learning about how the decision has evolved since the occurrence of the trial; this information is found in the website section about the long-term effects of the case. The author, G.S. Prentzas, graduated with honors from the University of North Carolina School of Law, and has written eleven non-fiction books for young readers.

 Ramen, Fred. The Rights of the Accused. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, 2001. Print. This book provides an extremely in-depth description of the current rights of the accused, as well as the history of these rights. It is useful for clarifying any rights that are difficult to thoroughly understand, as well as for identifying Supreme Court cases that would be worth researching further; it even has an index in the back that sorts the book by topics and cases, and a glossary that provides definitions of many legal terms. Overall, it is helpful in learning about the long-term effects of the case. The author, Fred Ramen, has written multiple books about individual rights, and was a semifinalist in the 1997 Jeopardy! Tournament of Champions.

 "Rights of the Accused." Civil Rights in America. Woodbridge, CT: Primary Source Media, 1999. American Journey. U.S. History in Context. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. This secondary source provides a very detailed description of the Constitutional amendments that involve the rights of the accused. It is extremely useful in understanding exactly what rights the accused possess, so that this can be better explained in the website sections about both the causes and the long-term effects of the Miranda decision. It is also sorted by amendments, so it is helpful in realizing which rights are involved in each amendment.

“Rights of the Accused." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Capital Punishment. Bruce E.R. Thompson. Ed. Mary Jo Poole. Detroit: Greenhaven Press, 2006. 255. U.S. History in Context. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. This is a brief summary of the most important rights possessed by accused people; the right to counsel, the right to refrain from self-incrimination, and the right to trial by jury. It also explains which amendments involve these rights. It is a very useful starting point for understanding what rights the accused have, and is useful in learning about the existing rights prior to the case, as well as the long-term effects of the case.

"Rights of the Accused." This Nation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Nov. 2013. This website is a secondary source from a text book. It lists the certain rights that the accused have, and explains what they are. It also gives examples for each right that provide extra information on the reason the right was created and how it can be applied. This is useful for basic information on the actual rights of the accused, and is a very good starting point. Having this basic knowledge of the rights is necessary in knowing how these rights connected to the Miranda case; this information helped to provide a  thorough explanation of the rights of the accused in both the causes and long-term effects sections of the website.

Sonneborn, Liz. Miranda v. Arizona: The Rights of the Accused. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, 2004. Print. This book does not go into extreme detail, but it covers practically all of the aspects that we are researching; it provides a general description of the crime itself, the trial, and the immediate and lasting effects of the decision. It is especially useful in learning more about the arrest and interrogation of Miranda, because most other sources do not provide extensive information about this. This information is found in the section of the website about the crime itself. The author, Liz Sonneborn, has written over thirty books for children and adults on the subject of history, one of which is the winner of a 2000 Parent’s Choice Award.

Vander, Hook Sue, and Yale Kamisar. Miranda v. Arizona: An Individual's Rights When under Arrest. Minneapolis, MN: ABDO Pub., 2013. Print. This book, similar to that by Liz Sonneborn, provides a general description of nearly all of the aspects of the case that we are interested in; however, it also includes a lengthy section about before the case. This section is the most useful to our website, as it will help us to write the section of the website about the rights of the accused prior to the Miranda decision, and about how these rights were modified as an effect of the case. The author, Sue Vander Hook, has written over thirty educational books for young adults, and the content consultant, Yale Kamisar, is the coauthor of all 12 editions of Modern Criminal Procedure, the most widely used law school casebook on criminal procedure.

Van Meter, Larry A. Miranda v. Arizona: The Rights of the Accused. New York: Chelsea House, 2007. Print. This book gives a very detailed description of the Miranda v. Arizona trial, and the effects of the decision. It is helpful for learning more lesser-known facts about the case, such as the life of Ernesto Miranda, and the court's reasoning behind their verdict. This information appears in the website section about the trial itself, as well as in the sections about the short and long-term effects of the decision. The author, Larry A. Van Meter, earned a PhD in English at Texas A&M University, and is now an English teacher at York College.

"What Are Your Miranda Rights?" Mirandawarning.org. N.p., 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2013.

This is a secondary source that explains what the Miranda Rights are. It is helpful because it gives a clear explanation of exactly which rights these are, and also includes a quote of the Miranda Warning. This information appears in the section of the website about the long-term effects of the decision, as the Miranda Warning is an essential part of law enforcement today.



Wilson, Gary. Personal Interview. 12 Jan. 2014. Gary Wilson is the first Assistant Clerk and

Magistrate at the Suffolk Superior Court in Boston, MA, and thus has experience working in a courthouse. He provided ample information about the long-term effects of the Miranda decision, and gave insight into how it has affected court cases today.


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