Ancient History Stage 6 Syllabus Original published version updated



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Ancient History

Stage 6

Syllabus

Original published version updated:

May 2006 – BOS Job Number 2006280

June 2009 – Assessment and Reporting information updated

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Published by

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ISBN 1 7414 7087 0


2009333

Contents
1 Background 5

2 Rationale 6

3 Continuum of Learning 7

4 Aim 8


5 Objectives 8

6 Course Requirements 8

7 Course Structure 9

8 Objectives and Outcomes 11

8.1 Objectives and Outcomes 11

8.2 Key Competencies 13

9 Content: Preliminary Course 14

9.1 Overview of the Content 14

9.2 Part I – Introduction 16

(a) Investigating the Past: History, Archaeology and Science 17

(b) Case Studies 19

1 Ancient human remains 20

2 Entombed warriors from Xian 20

3 Ur 20


4 Masada 21

5 Etruscan tombs 21

6 Homer and the Trojan War 21

7 Boudicca: resistance to Roman rule 22

8 Tutankhamun’s tomb 22

9.3 Part II – Studies of Ancient Societies, Sites and Sources 23

1 Alexandria 24

2 Deir-el Medina 24

3 Nineveh 25

4 Persepolis 25

5 Thera (Santorini) 25

6 Early Israel 26

7 Vergina 26

8 Greek society in the Archaic Period 27

9 Greek drama 27

10 Ancient China in the Qin and Han Dynasties 27

11 Roman writers on provincial government 28

12 The Celts in Europe 28

13 The City of Rome in the late Republic 28

14 Roman Britain 29

9.4 Part III – Historical Investigation 30

10 Content: HSC Course 31

10.1 Part I: Core Study: Cities of Vesuvius – Pompeii and Herculaneum 31

10.2 Part II: Ancient Societies 33

Option A Egypt: Society in Old Kingdom Egypt, Dynasties III–VI 35

Option B Egypt: Society in New Kingdom Egypt to the death of

Amenhotep III 36

Option C Egypt: Society in New Kingdom Egypt during the Ramesside


Period, Dynasties XIX and XX 37

Option D The Near East: Assyrian society from Sargon II to Ashurbanipal 38

Option E The Near East: Society in Israel from Solomon to the fall

of Samaria 39

Option F The Near East: Persian society at the time of Darius and Xerxes 40

Option G Greece: The Bronze Age – Society in Minoan Crete 41

Option H Greece: The Bronze Age – Mycenaean society 42

Option I Greece: Spartan society to the Battle of Leuctra 371 BC 43

Option J Greece: Athenian society in the time of Pericles 44

10.3 Part III: Personalities in Their Times 45

Option A Egypt: Hatshepsut 47

Option B Egypt: Akhenaten 48

Option C Egypt: Ramesses II 49

Option D The Near East: Sennacherib 50

Option E The Near East: Xerxes 51

Option F The Near East: Hannibal 52

Option G Greece: Pericles 53

Option H Greece: Alexander the Great 54

Option I Greece: Cleopatra VII 55

Option J Rome: Tiberius Gracchus 56

Option K Rome: Julius Caesar 57

Option L Rome: Agrippina the Younger 58

10.4 Part IV: Historical Periods 59

Option A Egypt: From Unification to the First Intermediate Period 61

Option B Egypt: New Kingdom Egypt to the death of Thutmose IV 62

Option C Egypt: New Kingdom Egypt from Amenhotep III to the death

of Ramesses II 63

Option D The Near East: Assyria from Tiglath-Pileser III to the fall of

Assyria 609 BC 64

Option E The Near East: Israel and Judah from Solomon to the fall

of Jerusalem 65

Option F The Near East: Persia from Cyrus II to the death of Darius III 66

Option G Greece: The development of the Greek world 800 – 500 BC 67

Option H Greece: The Greek world 500 – 440 BC 68

Option I Greece: The Greek world 446 – 399 BC 69

Option J Greece: Fourth-century Greece to the death of Philip II of


Macedon 70

Option K Rome: 264 – 133 BC 71

Option L Rome: Political revolution in Rome 133 – 78 BC 72

Option M Rome: The fall of the Republic 78 – 31 BC 73

Option N Rome: The Augustan Age 44 BC – AD 14 74

Option O Rome: The Julio-Claudians and the Roman Empire AD 14 – 69 75

Option P Rome: The Roman Empire AD 69 – 235 76

11 Assessment and Reporting 77



12 Post-school Opportunities 78

1 Background
The Higher School Certificate Program of Study
The purpose of the Higher School Certificate program of study is to:

  • provide a curriculum structure which encourages students to complete secondary education

  • foster the intellectual, social and moral development of students, in particular developing their:

  • knowledge, skills, understanding and attitudes in the fields of study they choose

  • capacity to manage their own learning

  • desire to continue learning in formal or informal settings after school

  • capacity to work together with others

  • respect for the cultural diversity of Australian society

  • provide a flexible structure within which students can prepare for:

  • further education and training

  • employment

  • full and active participation as citizens

  • provide formal assessment and certification of students’ achievements

  • provide a context within which schools also have the opportunity to foster students’ physical and spiritual development.


2 Rationale
The study of history is an inquiry into past experience that helps make the present more intelligible. A study of the past is invaluable, for to be unaware of history is to be ignorant of those forces that have shaped our social and physical worlds. Through the study of ancient history, students learn both about the interaction of societies and the impact of individuals and groups on ancient events and ways of life. The study of ancient history gives students an understanding of the possibilities and limitations of comparing past to present and present to past by exposing them to a variety of perspectives on key events and issues. It also gives them opportunities to develop their own perspectives on the origins and influence of ideas, values and behaviours that are still relevant in the modern world.
Ancient History Stage 6 has a unique role in the school curriculum because it allows students to study and analyse past societies with a detachment conferred by the perspectives of at least two millennia. It draws on a variety of disciplines and sources, both written and archaeological, such as literary works, coins, inscriptions, art, architecture, artefacts and human remains, enabling students to piece together an informed and coherent view of the past. Because the amount of surviving evidence is relatively small, students are able to consider it in its entirety and thus weigh their own interpretations alongside those found in published secondary works, while noting how to deal with gaps in the evidence. In addition, it introduces students to scientific methods used in the historian’s investigation of archaeological evidence.
Students study ancient history because it provides them with opportunities to satisfy their fascination and interest in the stories of the past and the mysteries of human behaviour. It allows them to develop and apply the research skills and methodologies of the historian and archaeologist. It equips students to question critically and interpret written and archaeological sources for the evidence they provide about the ancient world.
Through the study of ancient history, students develop knowledge and understanding of the similarities and differences between the various societies of the ancient past and the factors affecting change and continuity in human affairs.
A study of ancient history contributes to students’ education, introducing them to a wide range of religious beliefs and customs, ideologies and other cultures. This broad knowledge encourages them to develop an appreciation and understanding of different views and makes them aware of how these views contribute to individual and group actions.
The study of ancient history raises significant contemporary ethical issues associated with present and future ownership, administration and presentation of the cultural past. It empowers students with knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that are useful for their lifelong learning.
The skills, knowledge and understanding that students acquire through studying Ancient History Stage 6 make it a good introduction to the world of work and informed citizenship. This is because Ancient History Stage 6 teaches a critical and intelligent reading of events and documents, as well as the effective and fluent communication of narrative, detail, ideas and judgements.
3 Continuum of Learning

HSIE K–6


Change and Continuity
Cultures





History Stage 4
Mandatory World
History
History Stage 5
Mandatory Australian
History
Elective History

Other Stage 4–5


Subjects

Other Stage 4–5
Subjects



Ancient History


Stage 6

Modern History
Stage 6





History Extension Stage 6

Workplace/University/TAFE/Other


Stage 4 History (Mandatory) students are required to undertake an introductory unit Investigating History which explores the purpose and nature of history and the process used by historians to investigate and record the past. It also examines issues of heritage and conservation in relation to a study of the past. In Stage 4, all students are required to study at least one ancient society.


Stage 5 History (Mandatory) focuses on twentieth-century Australian history. Students continue to develop the skills of historical inquiry through this study. An understanding of the Stages 4–5 (Mandatory) material is assumed knowledge for Ancient History students in Stage 6.
4 Aim
The study of Ancient History enables students to acquire knowledge and understanding, historical skills, and values and attitudes essential to an appreciation of the ancient world; to develop a lifelong interest and enthusiasm for ancient history; and to prepare for informed and active citizenship in the contemporary world.

Objectives_Through_the_study_of_Ancient_History_Stage_6_students_will_develop:_knowledge_and_understanding_about'>5 Objectives
Through the study of Ancient History Stage 6 students will develop:
knowledge and understanding about:

1 people, places, societies and events in the context of their times

2 change and continuity over time
skills to:

3 undertake the process of historical inquiry

4 communicate an understanding of history
values and attitudes about:

5 the diversity and complexity of ancient societies

6 the influence of the ancient past on the present and the future

7 the value of Ancient History for personal growth and lifelong learning

8 the conservation of the past.

6 Course Requirements
For the Preliminary course:


  • 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course


For the HSC course:

  • the Preliminary course is a prerequisite

  • 120 indicative hours are required to complete the course.



7 Course Structure
Preliminary Course (120 indicative hours)
The Preliminary course is structured to provide students with opportunities to investigate past people, groups, events, institutions, societies and historical sites from the sources available, by applying the methods used by historians and archaeologists.
Students are required to study Parts I, II and III of the course.
Part I: Introduction

(a) Investigating the Past: History, Archaeology and Science

(b) Case Studies
At least ONE case study should be undertaken.

A range of possible case studies is provided in Section 9, page 19.


Part II: Studies of Ancient Societies, Sites and Sources

At least ONE study of ancient societies, sites and sources should be undertaken.

A range of possible studies is provided in Section 9, page 23.
Part III: Historical Investigation

The investigation can be integrated into any aspect of the Preliminary course and need not be completed as one project. It may be conducted individually or as part of a group. The investigation must not overlap or duplicate significantly any topic attempted for the HSC Ancient History or History Extension courses.


Further detail on the investigation is provided on page 30.
Choices of studies in Parts I, II and III, other than those offered here, must be chosen from different civilisations.

HSC Course (120 indicative hours)
The course comprises a study of:
Part I: Core: Cities of Vesuvius – Pompeii and Herculaneum 25%

Part II: ONE Ancient Society 25%

Part III: ONE Personality in Their Time 25%

Part IV: ONE Historical Period 25%


The course requires study from at least TWO of the following areas:

1 Egypt


2 Near East

3 Greece


4 Rome
The core study, Cities of Vesuvius – Pompeii and Herculaneum, is a Roman study.


Preliminary Course

(120 indicative hours)

HSC Course

(120 indicative hours)

Part I: Introduction

(a) Investigating the Past: History, Archaeology and Science:

(b) Case Studies
At least ONE case study should be undertaken.

A range of possible case studies is provided in Section 9, page 19.



Part II: Ancient Societies, Sites and Sources
At least ONE study of ancient societies, sites and sources should be undertaken.

A range of possible studies is provided in Section 9, page 23.



Part III: Historical Investigation
The historical investigation can be integrated into any aspect of the Preliminary course. The investigation must not overlap or duplicate significantly any topic attempted for the HSC Ancient History or History Extension courses.


Part I: Core: Cities of Vesuvius –
Pompeii and Herculaneum 25%


Part II: Ancient Societies 25%

One ancient society is to be studied.



Part III: Personalities in Their Times 25%

One personality is to be studied.



Part IV: Historical Periods 25%

One historical period is to be studied.



The HSC course requires study from at least TWO of the following areas:

  • Egypt

  • Near East

  • Greece

  • Rome


Note: The core study, Cities of Vesuvius: Pompeii and Herculaneum, is a Roman study



8 Objectives and Outcomes
8.1 Objectives and Outcomes


Objectives
A student develops knowledge and understanding about:

Preliminary Course Outcomes
A student develops the skills to:

HSC Course Outcomes
A student develops the skills to:

1 people, places, societies and events in the context of their times

P1.1 describe and explain the contribution of key people, groups, events, institutions, societies and sites within the historical context

H1.1 describe and assess the significance of key people, groups, events, institutions, societies and sites within the historical context

2 change and continuity over time


P2.1 identify historical factors and explain their significance in contributing to change and continuity in the ancient world

H2.1 explain historical factors and assess their significance in contributing to change and continuity in the ancient world

3 the process of historical inquiry

P3.1 locate, select and organise relevant information from a variety of sources

P3.2 identify relevant problems of sources in reconstructing the past

P3.3 comprehend sources and analyse them for their usefulness and reliability

P3.4 identify and account for differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

P3.5 discuss issues relating to ownership and custodianship of the past

P3.6 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from a range of sources



H3.1 locate, select and organise relevant information from a variety of sources

H3.2 discuss relevant problems of sources for reconstructing the past

H3.3 analyse and evaluate sources for their usefulness and reliability

H3.4 explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the past

H3.5 analyse issues relating to ownership and custodianship of the past

H3.6 plan and present the findings of historical investigations, analysing and synthesising information from a range of sources



4 communicating an understanding of history

P4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

P4.2 communicate knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate oral and written forms



H4.1 use historical terms and concepts appropriately

H4.2 communicate knowledge and understanding of historical features and issues using appropriate oral and written forms




Values and Attitudes
Values and attitudes are inherent in the subject matter of Ancient History and the skills that are developed. They result from learning experiences and reflection.
Students need to develop values and attitudes that promote an informed and just society.


Objectives
A student develops values and attitudes about:



A student:

5 the diversity and complexity of ancient societies

  • values the complexity and variety of human experiences as reflected in the history of the ancient world

  • respects different viewpoints, ways of living, belief systems and languages

6 the influence of the ancient past on the present and the future

  • appreciates the ways the past can inform the present and the future

  • appreciates the impact of the ancient world on current lifestyles, issues, beliefs and institutions

  • develops tolerant and informed attitudes about the contemporary world

  • is able to participate in society in an informed way as an individual or as a member of groups

7 the value of Ancient History for personal growth and lifelong learning

  • develops an interest in history for lifelong learning

  • enriches personal experiences in response to travel and leisure activities

8 the conservation of the past

  • develops a sense of responsibility to conserve the past



8.2 Key Competencies
Ancient History provides a powerful context within which to develop general competencies considered essential for the acquisition of effective, higher-order thinking skills necessary for further education, work and everyday life.
Key competencies are embedded in the Ancient History Stage 6 Syllabus to enhance student learning.
The key competencies of collecting, analysing and organising information and communicating ideas and information reflect core processes of historical inquiry and are explicit in the objectives and outcomes of the syllabus.
The other key competencies are developed through the methodologies of the syllabus and through classroom pedagogy in the following ways:

  • students work as individuals and as members of groups to conduct historical investigations, and through this, the key competencies planning and organising activities and working with others and in teams are developed

  • when students construct timelines or analyse statistical evidence, they are developing the key competency using mathematical ideas and techniques

  • during investigations, students will need to use appropriate information technologies and so develop the key competency using technology

  • finally, the exploration of issues and investigation of the nature of historical problems contribute toward students’ development of the key competency solving problems.


9 Content: Preliminary Course
9.1 Overview of the Content
The Preliminary course is structured to provide students with opportunities to investigate past people, groups, events, institutions, societies and historical sites through archaeological and written sources by applying the methods used by historians, archaeologists and other related specialists and scholars.
The course comprises the following parts:



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