"analysis", "cosmetics" and "lead"



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Research Topic task started on Wed Mar 18, 2009 at 9:34 AM

11 Research Topic candidates were identified in CAPLUS and MEDLINE.

using the phrase "analysis of cosmetics for lead"

Selected 2 of 11 candidate topics.


120 references were found containing all of the concepts "analysis", "cosmetics" and "lead" closely associated with one another.
434 references were found where all of the concepts "analysis", "cosmetics" and "lead" were present anywhere in the reference.

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272 references were found when refined by Language "English"

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259 references were found when refined by Document Type "Journal"

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MEDLINE: Produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine
REGISTRY: Copyright Ó 2009 American Chemical Society. All Rights Reserved. (Some records contain information from GenBank(R). See also: Benson D.A., Karsch-Mizrachi I., Lipman D.J., Ostell J., Rapp B.A., Wheeler D.L. Genbank. Nucl. Acids Res. 28(1):15-18 (2000). Property values tagged with IC are from the ZIC/VINITI data file provided by InfoChem.) CAS Registry is a service mark of the American Chemical Society.
CASREACT: Copyright Ó 2009 American Chemical Society. All Rights Reserved. CASREACT contains reactions from CAS and from: ZIC/VINITI database (1974-1999) provided by InfoChem; INPI data prior to 1986; Biotransformations database compiled under the direction of Professor Dr. Klaus Kieslich; organic reactions, portions copyright 1996-2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Organic Reactions Inc., and Organic Syntheses Inc. Reproduced under license. All Rights Reserved.
CHEMLIST, CHEMCATS: Copyright Ó 2009 American Chemical Society. All Rights Reserved.


Bibliographic Information
Neutron activation analysis of trace elements in Japanese hormesis cosmetics. Furuta, E.; Nakahara, H.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Matsue, H.; Sakane, H. Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Ohtsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry (2008), 278(3), 553-557. Publisher: Springer, CODEN: JRNCDM ISSN: 0236-5731. Journal written in English. CAN 150:175742 AN 2008:1442534 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
In Japan, cosmetics claiming hormesis effect are available through Internet. Although these cosmetics show the contents, they never mention the minor elements and radioactive sources. The existence of radioisotopes, however, was obsd. by measurements of the gamma-rays with a HPGe detector. In this study, to clarify the contents of trace elements, the hormesis cosmetics including radioactive sources were analyzed using INAA, PGAA, and NAA with multiple gamma-ray detection (NAAMG). Nineteen elements were analyzed quant. in hormesis cosmetics by INAA, PGAA, and NAAMG and 16 elements were detected qual. by SEM-EPMA.
Bibliographic Information
Simultaneous determination of heavy metals in cosmetic products. Lee, So-Mi; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Chang, Ih Seop. R+D Center, Amore Pacific Corporation, 314-1 Bora-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, S. Korea. Journal of Cosmetic Science (2008), 59(5), 441-448. Publisher: Society of Cosmetic Chemists, CODEN: JCSCFC ISSN: 1525-7886. Journal written in English. CAN 149:540896 AN 2008:1321677 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
An extremely small amt. of several heavy metals have been detected in cosmetic products as impurities, which can cause skin allergies through percutaneous adsorption on the skin. We present here a fast, accurate, and highly sensitive method for simultaneous detn. of Pb2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Cd2+ and Mn2+ in coloring agents and cosmetic products, to be evaluated by ion chromatog. All of these metals are well sepd. through a bifunctional ion-exchange column (IonPac CS5A) and detected by post-column reaction and spectrophotometric detection. The calibration graphs are linear (r2 > 0.999), in the range 0.1-1000 mg/mL. Detection limits for a 200-ml sample soln. are at the mg/l level, which is sufficient for judging whether the product is safe or not. The relative std. deviations (RSDs) of the retention time and the peak area are less than 0.21% and 1.24%, resp. The recovery rates are 97-104%. The result shows that the proposed detn. method is more sensitive, more accurate, and faster than current methods such as HPLC, ICP-MS and Flame-AAS. The new method was applied to analyze the amt. of heavy metals contained in 22 cosmetic products and 11 coloring agents.
Bibliographic Information
A study of the chemical composition of traditional eye cosmetics ("kohls" used in Qatar and Yemen. Hardy, Andrew D.; Farrant, Alexander J.; Rollinson, Gavyn; Barss, Peter; Vaishnav, Ragini. Centre for Medical History, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, UK. Journal of Cosmetic Science (2008), 59(5), 399-418. Publisher: Society of Cosmetic Chemists, CODEN: JCSCFC ISSN: 1525-7886. Journal written in English. CAN 149:540895 AN 2008:1321675 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
This study looks at the chem. compn. of traditional eye cosmetics ("kohls") used in Qatar and Yemen. Of especial interest was how many samples in each country contain the toxic element lead. In Qatar 19 observably different kohl samples were obtained, and in Yemen ten such samples obtained. The anal. techniques of SEM and x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were used to study the samples. For the samples from Qatar, six of the 19 (32%) contained galena (lead sulfide, PbS)-all as the main component. However, for the samples from Yemen, five of the ten (50%) samples contained galena as the main component, with another three having it present as a minor component. Overall, the other main components were found to be: amorphous carbon (3), iron oxides (hematite, Fe2O3; and goethite, FeO(OH)) (1), quartz (SiO2) (1), sassolite (H3BO3) (5), talc (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2) (1), and zincite (ZnO) (7).
Bibliographic Information
Analysis of ancient Greco-Roman cosmetic materials using laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Elslande, Elsa; Guerineau, Vincent; Thirioux, Vincent; Richard, Ghislaine; Richardin, Pascale; Laprevote, Olivier; Hussler, Georges; Walter, Philippe. Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), CNRS UMR 171, Paris, Fr. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2008), 390(7), 1873-1879. Publisher: Springer, CODEN: ABCNBP ISSN: 1618-2642. Journal written in English. CAN 148:516919 AN 2008:351826 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Microsamples of pink cosmetic powders from the Greco-Roman period were analyzed using two complementary anal. approaches for identification of the coloring agents (lake pigments originally manufd. from madder plants with an inert binder, usually a metallic salt) present in the samples. The first technique was a methanolic acidic extn. of the archaeol. samples with an addnl. Et acetate extn. of the anthraquinone-type coloring agents which were identified using high performance liq. chromatog. coupled to electrospray ionization with high resoln. mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-HRMS), and the second was direct anal. of a microsample by laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). The latter technique is well suited when the quantity of samples is very low. This soft ionization technique enables the detection of very small quantities of compds. using the combination of pos. and neg.-ion modes. It was also successfully applied for the direct anal. of some lab.-made ref. compds. However, the presence of lead in one of these ancient samples induced a spectral suppression phenomenon. In this case and conditional on a sufficient quantity of available sample, the former method is better adapted for the characterization of these anthraquinone-type mols. This study also confirmed that purpurin, munjistin, and pseudopurpurin are the principal coloring agents present in these ancient cosmetic powders constituted from madder plants.
Bibliographic Information
Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction. Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.; Menu, M. CNRS UMR 171, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Paris, Fr. Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing (2007), 89(4), 825-832. Publisher: Springer, CODEN: APAMFC ISSN: 0947-8396. Journal written in English. CAN 148:191400 AN 2007:1187081 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Lead white pigment was used and synthesized for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and prepn. processes as well as locations of prodn. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction anal. using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to assoc. the compn. of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterization of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of compn., graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main compn. groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geog. origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realize paintings during northern European Renaissance.
Bibliographic Information
Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Docekal, Bohumil; Vojtkova, Blanka. Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno, Czech Rep. Spectrochimica Acta, Part B: Atomic Spectroscopy (2007), 62B(3), 304-308. Publisher: Elsevier B.V., CODEN: SAASBH ISSN: 0584-8547. Journal written in English. CAN 147:44571 AN 2007:497545 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
A true direct solid sampling electrothermal at. absorption spectrometry method with Zeeman-effect background correction (Analytik Jena ZEEnit 60 AAS) was developed for the detn. of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn in powd. TiO2 of pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics grade. The interaction of the Ti matrix and graphite surface of the sample carrier boat in a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer was studied. Conversion of TiO2 to interfering TiO2-TiC-liq. phase, running out the sampling boat, was obsd. at temps. >2000°. The temp. program was optimized accordingly for these volatile analytes in atomization and cleaning steps to prevent this interference and to prolong significantly the anal. lifetime of the boat to more than one thousand runs. For all elements, calibration by aq. std. addn. method, by wet-chem. analyzed samples with different content of analytes and/or by dosing one sample in different amts., were proved as adequate quantification procedures. Linear dynamic calibration working ranges can be considerably expanded up to two orders of magnitude within one measurement run by applying three-field dynamic mode of the Zeeman background correction system. The results obtained by true direct solid sampling technique are compared with those of other independent, mostly wet-chem. methods. Very low limits of detection (3s criterion) of true solid sampling technique of 21, 0.27, 24, 3.9, 6.3 and 0.9 ng g-1 were achieved for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn, resp.
Bibliographic Information
Kinetics of oil saponification by lead salts in ancient preparations of pharmaceutical lead plasters and painting lead mediums. Cotte, M.; Checroun, E.; Susini, J.; Dumas, P.; Tchoreloff, P.; Besnard, M.; Walter, Ph. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, Fr. Talanta (2006), 70(5), 1136-1142. Publisher: Elsevier B.V., CODEN: TLNTA2 ISSN: 0039-9140. Journal written in English. CAN 146:27177 AN 2006:1189834 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Lead soaps can be found in archaeol. cosmetics as well as in oil paintings, as product of interactions of lead salts with oil. In this context, a better understanding of the formation of lead soaps allows a follow-up of the historical evolution of prepn. recipes and provides new insights into conservation conditions. First, ancient recipes of both pharmaceutical lead plasters and painting lead media, mixts. of oil and lead salts, were reconstructed. The ester sapon. by lead salts is detd. by the prepn. parameters which were quantified by FT-IR spectrometry. In particular, ATR/FT-IR spectrometer was calibrated by the std. addn. method to quant. follow the kinetics of this reaction. The influence of different parameters such as temp., presence of water and choice of lead salts was assessed: the sapon. is clearly accelerated by water and heating. This anal. provides chem. explanations to the historical evolution of cosmetic and painting prepn. recipes.
Bibliographic Information
Availability and chemical composition of traditional eye cosmetics ("kohls") used in the United Arab Emirates of Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al-Quwain, Ras Al-Khaimah, and Fujairah. Hardy, Andrew D.; Walton, Richard I.; Myers, Kathryn A.; Vaishnav, Ragini. Centre for Medical History, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Exeter, Devon, UK. Journal of Cosmetic Science (2006), 57(2), 107-125. Publisher: Society of Cosmetic Chemists, CODEN: JCSCFC ISSN: 1525-7886. Journal written in English. CAN 145:425209 AN 2006:587937 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
This study was undertaken in order to det. the availability and chem. compn. of potentially lead-toxic traditional eye cosmetics ("kohls") in six of the seven emirates of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Thus of especial interest was the percentage of the purchased samples that contained the toxic element lead. A total of 53 observably different kohl samples were found to be available overall in the six emirates: Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al-Quwain, Ras Al-Khaimah, and Fujairah. It was found that 19 of these samples were previously analyzed in studies covering Oman, Abu Dhabi (city), and Egypt (Cairo). The techniques of x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and SEM were used to analyze the remaining 34 samples. Overall, for the 53 kohl samples, it was found that 20 (38%) contained a lead compd. (galena, PbS) as the main component. The other main components were found to be one of the following: amorphous carbon, calcite/aragonite (CaCO3), goethite (FeO(OH)), hematite (Fe2O3), sassolite (H3BO3), talc (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2), or zincite (ZnO).
Bibliographic Information
Trace metal contents of facial (make-up) cosmetics commonly used in Nigeria. Nnorom, I. C.; Igwe, J. C.; Oji-Nnorom, C. G. Department of Industrial Chemistry, Abia State University, Uturu, Nigeria. African Journal of Biotechnology - ONLINE (2005), 4(10), 1133-1138. Publisher: Academic Journals, CODEN: AJBFAH ISSN: 1684-5315. http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB/PDF/Pdf2005/Oct/Nnorom%20et%20al%203.pdf Journal; Online Computer File written in English. CAN 144:494813 AN 2005:1215158 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Several facial cosmetics available in Nigeria were analyzed for their contents of the heavy metals; lead, cadmium, chromium, nickel, zinc and iron. The levels of chromium, iron and zinc were much higher in the samples than those of the non-essential toxic metals; lead, cadmium and nickel. The range of the geometric av. for the various cosmetics is: Fe, 97-256 mg/g; Ni, 8-13 mg/g; Pb, 87-123 mg/g; and Zn, 88-101 mg/g. The geometric mean values obtained for Cr and Cd were generally below 40 mg/g and about 1 mg/g, resp. Our result indicates that these cosmetics are relatively safer to use when compared to the lead-based kwali eye make-up commonly available in Nigeria. These data indicate that the continuous use of these cosmetics could result in an increase in the trace metal levels in the ocular system and the human body beyond acceptable limits. The application of these cosmetics needs to be considered as a source of lead in evaluating patients with symptoms of lead intoxication in regions where this practice is common.
Bibliographic Information
New insight on ancient cosmetic preparation by synchrotron-based infrared microscopy. Cotte, M.; Dumas, P.; Richard, G.; Breniaux, R.; Walter, Ph. Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France (C2RMF), UMR 171 CNRS, Paris, Fr. Analytica Chimica Acta (2005), 553(1-2), 105-110. Publisher: Elsevier B.V., CODEN: ACACAM ISSN: 0003-2670. Journal written in English. CAN 143:421799 AN 2005:1165684 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Synchrotron IR micro-spectroscopy is appropriately suited to the anal. of small particles of archaeol. cosmetics. The sample originates from a 33 centuries old Egyptian cosmetic remain. Thanks to the high spectral quality and high lateral resoln. achieved by this synchrotron-based microspectroscopic tool, new insights into the compn. and spatial location of both org. and mineral components of the sample were obtained. Five different particles were analyzed and delivered similar findings: the core is fat rich, and surrounded with a mineral phase. In two particles, lead palmitate was clearly identified as a major component. Phosgenite (Pb2CO3Cl2), a lead salt synthesized in aq. soln., was also located in region near the surface of the particles.
Bibliographic Information
Analysis of samples of cosmetic emulsions from a market in Ibadan, Nigeria. Oyedeji, F. O.; Oderinde, R. A. Chemistry Department, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. International Journal of Chemistry (2005), 15(1), 35-41. Publisher: Institute of Science & Technology, CODEN: INJCEW Journal written in English. CAN 143:352808 AN 2005:549113 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Seventeen samples of cosmetic emulsions for skin care were obtained by randomly buying samples from Bodija open market in Ibadan, Nigeria. The samples were analyzed comparatively for the following parameters: emulsion type, pH, cond., water content, total volatile, total non volatile matter, acid value, ester value, and sapon. value. Levels of heavy metals like lead and iron were also detd. The results obtained indicate that the samples were mostly oil in water emulsion type. Conductivities of samples ranged from 0.2 mscm-1 to 46 mscm-1 with pH mostly close to neutral range (6.0 - 7.8) and having large quantity of water incorporated during emulsion formation. The low sapon. values (0.16 - 18.12 mgKOH/g) of the samples pointed to the fact that the samples were mostly paraffin based and most likely consisted of paraffin oil, paraffin wax, petroleum jelly, and beeswax that do not easily saponify. The samples also had low fatty acids and ester values (0.16 - 4.80 mg KOH/g and 0.00 - 13.32 mgKOH/g resp.) indicating the lack of use of animal or vegetable oils. Iron levels in the emulsion ranged from 0.1 ppm - 4.3 ppm, showing that most of the companies did not use deionized water. Only 1 sample contained lead at a level of 0.1 ppm showing that the hydrocarbons used in the formulation of the emulsions and the water used were relatively unpolluted. The general indications are that the cosmetic emulsions though stable will not be of much use for proper therapeutic treatment of dry skin conditions, but may be useful for temporary relieve of skin dryness.
Bibliographic Information
Spectrophotometric analysis of Cisplatin injection and lead containing cosmetics using 2-acetylpyridine-4-phenyl-3- thiosemicarbazone as complexing reagent. Arain, G. Murtaza; Laghari, Abdul Jabbar; Khuhawar, M. Y. Dr. M. A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pak. Pakistan Journal of Analytical Chemistry (2003), 4(1), 8-10. Publisher: Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, CODEN: PJACBX ISSN: 1680-9955. Journal written in English. CAN 141:59851 AN 2004:522052 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
The reaction of reagent 2-acetylpyridine-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (APPT) was examd. towards platinum (II), gold (III), vanadium (V), ruthenium (IV), tellurium (VI), arsenic (III) and lead (II) spectrophotometrically. The reactions were carried out in slightly acidic to neutral media and indicated molar absorptivity in range 9.6´102 to 2.2´104 L. mole-1 cm-1 between 370 to 435 nm. Each of the complex obeyed the Beer's Law. The method was used for anal. of anticancer drug cisplatin and cosmetic (Surma) for the contents of platinum (II) and lead (II) resp.
Bibliographic Information
Determination of the toxic lead level in cosmetic-hair dye formulations using a screen-printed silver electrode. Shih, Ying; Zen, Jyh-Myng; Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Lee, Yi-Chien; Huang, Hui-Rou. Department of Applied Cosmetology, Hung-Kuang University, Taichung, Taiwan. Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan (2004), 77(2), 311-312. Publisher: Chemical Society of Japan, CODEN: BCSJA8 ISSN: 0009-2673. Journal written in English. CAN 140:326588 AN 2004:156753 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
A disposable-type screen-printed non-single crystal silver electrode (AgSPE) surface has been demonstrated for the sensitive and selective quantification of lead in cosmetic hair-dye formulations using its underpotential deposition (UPD-Pb) process.
Bibliographic Information
Simultaneous Determination of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in Citrus Essential Oils by Derivative Potentiometric Stripping Analysis. La Pera, Lara; Saitta, Marcello; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Dugo, Giacomo. Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e Biologica, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2003), 51(5), 1125-1129. Publisher: American Chemical Society, CODEN: JAFCAU ISSN: 0021-8561. Journal written in English. CAN 138:237065 AN 2003:49667 CAPLUS (Copyright (C) 2009 ACS on SciFinder (R))
Abstract
Citrus essential oils are widely used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries, so the detn. of heavy metals content is of great importance to guarantee their quality. The present work deals with the quantification of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in different varieties of citrus essential oils, using deriv. potentiometric stripping anal. Two different metals extn. procedures, involving concd. HCl treatment and acid-alc. dissoln., are tested on lemon, mandarin, sweet orange, and bergamot essential oils, and they give very similar results. Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) recovery tests spanned from 95 to 100.50%, providing evidence that metals quantification remained unaffected by the cleanup steps of the 2 procedures. The repeatability of the HCl extn. method, applied on different varieties of essential oils, is >95.00% for Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II), whereas the repeatability of the acid-alc. dissoln. method is >93.00% for Cu and Cd only in lemon oil. Detection limits obtained for the 4 analytes, using both procedures, ranged from 0.10 to 0.98 ng/g in lemon, mandarin, sweet orange, and bergamot essential oils.


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