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A Source Book for Irish English [update]

Raymond Hickey

Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2002.

The current page contains a number additional bibliographical items which have been collected since the Source Book for Irish English went to press. Because a bibliography is an open-ended matter, anyone interested in Irish English should keep an eye on this page for new references to books or articles from the field of Irish English.

Date: August 2012



References not contained in book
Amador Moreno, Carolina P. 2005. ‘Discourse markers in Irish English: An example from literature’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 73-100.
Amador Moreno, Carolina P. 2006. An analysis of Hiberno-English in the early novels of Patrick MacGill. Bilingualism and language shift from Irish to English in County Donegal. Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press.
Amador-Moreno, Carolina P. 2010. An Introduction to Irish English. London: Equinox.
Amador Moreno, Carolina P. 2012. ‘The Irish in Argentina: Irish English transported’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 289-310.
Anderson, Malcolm and Eberhard Bort (eds) 1999. The Irish Border: History, Politics, Culture. Liverpool: University Press.
Anderwald, Liselotte 2004. ‘Local markedness as a heuristic tool in dialectology: The case of amn’t’, in Kortmann et al. (eds), pp. 47-68.
Antonini, R., Corrigan, Karen P., Li Wei 2002. ‘The Irish language in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland’, in Ammon, Ulrich, Klaus-Jürgen Mattheier and Peter Nelde (eds) Language Policy and Small Languages, Special Issue of Sociolinguistica: International Yearbook of European Sociolinguistics. Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, pp. 118-28.
Auer, Peter, F. Hinskens and Paul E. Kerswill (eds) 2005. Dialect Change: The Convergence and Divergence of Dialects in Contemporary Societies. Cambridge: University Press.
Barron, Anne 2005. ‘Offering in Ireland and England’, in Barron and Schneider (eds), pp. 141-76.
Barron, Anne 2008. ‘The structure of requests in Irish English and English English’, in Schneider and Barron (eds), pp. 35–67.
Barron, Anne 2008. ‘Contrasting requests in Inner Circle Englishes. A study in variational pragmatics’, in: Matrin Puetz and J. Neff van Aertselaer (eds) Contrastive Pragmatics: Interlanguage and Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Berlin / New York: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 355-402.
Barron, Anne and Klaus P. Schneider 2005. ‘Irish English: A focus on language in action’, in Barron and Schneider (eds), pp. 3-16.
Barron, Anne and Klaus P. Schneider (eds) 2005. The pragmatics of Irish English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Barron, Anne and Klaus P. Schneider (eds) 2009. Variational Pragmatics. Special issue of Intercultural Pragmatics 6.4: 425-615.
Beal, Joan C. 2004. ‘English dialects in the North of England: morphology and syntax’, in Kortmann et al. (eds), Vol. 2, pp. 114-41.
Beal, Joan C. and Karen P. Corrigan 2009. ‘The impact of nineteenth-century Irish-English migrations on contemporary northern Englishes: Tyneside and Sheffield compared’, in Penttilä and Paulasto (eds), pp. 231-258.
Beal, Kalynda 2012. ‘Is it truly unique that Irish English clefts are? Quantifying the syntactic variation of it-clefts in Irish English and other post-colonial English varieties’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 153-178.
Binchy, James 2005. ‘Three forty two so please: Politeness for sale in Southern-Irish service encounters’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 313-35.
Boisseau, Maryvonne and Françoise Roger (eds) 2006. Irish English: Varieties and Variations. Special issue of Études Irlandaises.
Byrne, Joseph 2004. Byrne’s Dictionary of Irish Local History from earliest times to c. 1900. Cork: Mercier Press.
Cacciaguidi-Fahy, Sophie and Martin Fahy 2005. ‘The pragmatics of intercultural business communication in financial shared service centres’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 269-312.
Cassidy, Daniel 2007. How the Irish Invented Slang: The Secret Language of the Crossroads. Oakland, CA: AK Press.
Cesiri, Daniela 2007. A Corpus of Irish Fairy and Folk Tales. A linguistic and discursive analysis of nineteenth-century transcriptions of irish folklore collected from traditional storytellers. PhD thesis, Università del Salento, Lecce, Italy.
Clancy, Brian 2005. ‘You’re fat. You’ll eat them all: Politeness strategies in family discourse’, in Barron and Schneider (eds), pp. 177-99.
Clancy, Brian and Elaine Vaughan 2012. ‘“It’s lunacy now”: A corpus-based pragmatic analysis of the use of ‘now’ in contemporary Irish English’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 225-246.
Clarke, Howard, Sarah Dent and Ruth Johnson 2002. Dublinia. The story of medieval Dublin. Dublin: The O’Brien Press.
Clarke, Sandra 2010. Newfoundland and Labrador English. Edinbrugh: University Press.
Clarke, Sandra 2012. ‘From Ireland to Newfoundland: What’s the perfect after doing?’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 101-130.
Cornips, Leonie and Karen P. Corrigan 2005. ‘Convergence and divergence in grammar’, in: Cornips and Corrigan (eds), pp. 96-134.
Cornips, Leonie and Karen P. Corrigan (eds) 2005 Syntax and variation: reconciling the biological and the social. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Corrigan, Karen P. 2003. ‘For-to infinitives and beyond: Interdisciplinary approaches to non-finite complementation in a rural Celtic English’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 318-38.
Corrigan, Karen P. 2003. ‘The ideology of nationalism and its impact on accounts of language shift in nineteenth century Ireland’, in Christian Mair (ed.) Acts of identity: Interaction-based sociolinguistics, Special issue of Arbeiten aus Anglistik und Amerikanistik 28 2: 201-30.
Corrigan, Karen P. 2010. Irish English, Vol. 1: Northern Ireland. Edinbrugh: University Press.
Corrigan, Karen P. 2011. ‘The “Art of Making the Best Use of Bad Data”’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press, pp. 183-206.
Corrigan, Karen P. 2011. ‘Grammatical variation in Irish English’, in Raymond Hickey (ed.) Irish English in Today’s World. Special issue of English Today, Vol 106, June 2011, pp. 39-46.
Corrigan, Karen P., Richard Edge and John Lonergan 2012. ‘Is Dublin English “Alive Alive Oh”?’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 1-28.
Cronin, Michael and Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin (eds) 2003. The languages of Ireland. Dublin: Four Courts Press.
Tymoczko, Maria Language interface in early Irish culture

Picard, Jean-Michel The Latin language in early medieval Ireland

Picard, Jean-Michel The French language in medieval Ireland

Dolan, Terence Translating Irelands: the English language in the Irish context

Fischer, Joachim The eagle that never landed: uses and abuses of the German language in Ireland

Robinson, Philip The historical presence of Ulster-Scots in Ireland

Mac Cóil, Liam Irish one of the languages of the world

Leeson, Lorraine Sign language interpreters: agents of social change in Ireland

Arkins, Brian Irish appropriation of Sophocles' Antigone and Philoctetes

Shields, Kathleen French connections: twentieth-century Irish translations of French poets

Ryan, Angela Memetics, metatranslation and cultural memory: the literary Imaginaires of Irish identity

Cronin, Michael Spaces between Irish worlds: travellers, translators and the new accelerators


Cronin, Michael 2011. ‘Ireland in translation’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Irish English in Today’s World. Special issue of English Today, Vol 106, June 2011, pp. 53-67.
Crowley, Tony 2005. Wars of Words: The Politics of Language in Ireland 1537-2004. Oxford: University Press.
Cunningham, Una 2011. ‘Echoes of Irish in the English of Southwest Tyrone’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press, pp. 207-222.
Davydova, Julia 2008. Perfect and Preterite: A corpus-based study of variation in Irish English. Arbeiten zur Mehrsprachigkeit, Universität Hamburg.
Diamant, Gili 2012. ‘The responsive system of Irish English: Features and patterns’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 247-264.
Dolan, Terence 2003. ‘Translating Irelands: the English language in the Irish context’, in Cronin and Ó Cuilleanáin (eds.), pp. 78-93.
Dolan, Terence 2004 [1998]. A dictionary of Hiberno-English. The Irish use of English. Dublin: Gill and Macmillan.
Dollinger, Stefan 2008. New-dialect formation in Canada. Evidence from the English modal auxiliaries. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Farr, Fiona 2005. ‘Relational strategies in the discourse of professional performance review in an Irish academic environment: The case of language teacher education’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 203-34.
Farr, Fiona and Brona Murphy 2009. ‘Religious references in contemporary Irish English: ‘for the love of God almighty. . . . I'm a holy terror for turf’ ’, Intercultural Pragmatics 6.4: 535-560.
Farr, Fiona, Murphy, Brona and Anne O’Keeffe 2003. ‘Limerick Corpus of Irish-English: design, description and application’, Teanga 21: 5-29.
Fenton, James 2006. The Hamely Tongue. A Personal Record of Ulster-Scots in County Antrim. Third edition. Newtownards: Ulster-Scots Academic Press.
Fieß, Astrid 2003. ‘Do be or not do be — generic/habitual forms in East Galway English’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 169-182.
Filppula, Markku 2003. ‘More on the English progressive and the Celtic connection’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 150-68.
Filppula, Markku 2004. ‘Irish English: morphology and syntax’, in Kortmann et al. (eds), Vol. 2, pp. 73-101.
Filppula, Markku 2004. ‘Dialect convergence areas or “Dialektbünde” in the British Isles’, in Lenz, Radtke and Zwickl (eds), pp. 177-88.
Filppula, Markku 2006. ‘The making of Hiberno-English and other ‘Celtic Englishes’’, in Ans van Kemenade and Bettelou Los (eds) The Handbook of the History of English (Malden, MA: Blackwell), pp. 507-36.
Filppula, Markku 2012. ‘Exploring grammatical differences between Irish and British English’, in: Migge and Ní Chiosáin (eds), pp. 85-100.
Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola and Heli Pitkänen. 2002. ‘Early Contacts between English and the Celtic Languages’, in Filppula, Klemola and Pitkänen (eds), pp. 1-26.
Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola and Heli Paulasto 2008. English and Celtic in contact. London: Routledge.
Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola and Heli Paulasto (eds) 2009. Vernacular Universals and Language Contacts: Evidence from Varieties of English and Beyond. London: Routledge.
Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola and Heli Pitkänen (eds) 2002. The Celtic roots of English. Studies in Languages 37. Joensuu: University Press.
Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola, Marjatta Palander and Esa Penttilä (eds) 2005. Dialects Across Borders. Selected Papers from the 11th International Conference on Methods in Dialectology (Methods XI), Joensuu, August 2002. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Fitzgerald, Patrick and Brian Lambkin 2008. Irish Migration 1607-2007. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
Fritz, Clemens 2006. ‘Resilient or yielding? Features of Irish English syntax and aspect in early Australia’, in: Nevalainen, Terttu, Juhani Klemola and Mikko Laitinen (eds) Types of Variation. Diachronic, dialectal and typological interfaces. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 281–301.
Gachelin, Jean-Marc 1997. ‘The progressive and habitual aspects in non-standard Englishes’; in Edgar Schneider (ed.) Englishes around the world: Vol. 1. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
García, Ofelia and Joshua A. Fishman (eds) 2002 [1997]. The Multilingual Apple. Languages in New York City. Second Edition. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Geisler, Christer 2002. ‘Relativization in Ulster English’, in Patricia Poussa (ed.) Relativisation on the North Sea litoral. München Lincom Europa. LINCOM Studies in Language Typology 07.
German, Gary 2000. ‘Britons, Anglo-Saxons, and scholars: 19th century attitudes towards the survival of Britons in Anglo-Saxon England’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 347-74.
German, Gary 2001. ‘The genesis of analytic structure in English: the case for a Brittonic substratum’, Groupe de recherche Anglo-Américain de Tours 24: 125-41.
German, Gary 2003. ‘The French of western Brittany in light of the Celtic Englishes’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 390-412.
Gilles, Peter and Peters, Jörg (eds) 2004. Regional Variation in Intonation. Tübingen: Niemeyer.
Grabe, Esther 2004. ‘Intonational variation in urban dialects of English spoken in the British Isles’ in Gilles and Peters (eds), pp. 9-31.
Hawes-Bilger, Cordula 2007. War Zone Language: Linguistic Aspects of the Conflict in Northern Ireland. Tübingen : Francke.
Heinecke, Johannes 2003. ‘The temporal and aspectual system of English and Welsh’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 85-110.
Hickey, Raymond 2002. ‘The Atlantic edge. The relationship between Irish English and Newfoundland English’, English World-Wide 23:2, 281-314.
Hickey, Raymond 2002. ‘Historical input and the regional differentiation of English in the Republic of Ireland’, in Katja Lenz and Ruth Möhlig (eds) Of dyuersitie & chaunge of langage. Essays presented to for Manfred Görlach on the occasion of his 65th birthday. (Heidelberg: Winter, 199-211).
Hickey, Raymond 2002. ‘Dublin and Middle English’, in Peter J. and Angela M. Lucas (eds) Middle English. From tongue to text. Selected papers from the Third International Conference on Middle English: Language and Text held at Dublin, Ireland, 1-4 July 1999. (Frankfurt: Lang, 187-200).
Hickey, Raymond 2003. ‘What’s cool in Irish English? Linguistic change in contemporary Ireland’, in Hildegard L. C. Tristram (ed.) Celtic Englishes III (Heidelberg: Winter), pp. 357-73.
Hickey, Raymond 2003. ‘How do dialects get the features they have? On the process of new dialect formation’, in Raymond Hickey (ed.) Motives for language change. (Cambridge: University Press, 213-39).
Hickey, Raymond 2003. ‘How and why supraregional varieties arise’, in Marina Dossena and Charles Jones (eds) Insights into Late Modern English (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 351-73).
Hickey, Raymond 2003. ‘Rectifying a standard deficiency. Pronominal distinctions in varieties of English’, in Irma Taavitsainen and Andreas H. Jucker (eds) Diachronic perspectives on address term systems, Pragmatics and Beyond, New Series, Vol. 107 (Amsterdam: Benjamins, 345-74).
Hickey, Raymond 2004. A sound atlas of Irish English. Topics in English Linguistics 48. Berlin/NewYork: Mouton de Gruyter.
Hickey, Raymond (ed.) 2004. Legacies of colonial English. Studies in transported dialects. Cambridge University Press.
Hickey, Raymond 2004. ‘The development and diffusion of Irish English’, in Hickey (ed.). pp. 82-117.
Hickey, Raymond 2004. ‘English dialect input to the Caribbean’, in Hickey (ed.), pp. 326-59.
Hickey, Raymond 2004. ‘The phonology of Irish English’, in Kortmann et al. (eds), Vol. 1, pp. 68-97.
Hickey, Raymond 2005. ‘English in Ireland’, in D. Alan Cruse, Franz Hundsnurscher, Michael Job and Peter R. Lutzeier (eds) Lexikologie-Lexicology. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 1256-60.
Hickey, Raymond 2005. Dublin English. Evolution and change. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
Hickey, Raymond 2005. ‘Irish English in the context of previous research’, in Barron and Schneider (eds), pp. 17-43.
Hickey, Raymond. 2006. ‘Irish English, research and developments’, in Études Irlandaises. Special issue Irish English. Varieties and Variations, edited by Maryvonne Boisseau and Françoise Canon-Roger, pp. 11-32.
Hickey, Raymond 2006. ‘Contact, shift and language change. Irish English and South African Indian English’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 234-58.
Hickey, Raymond. 2007. ‘Dartspeak and Estuary English. Advanced metropolitan speech in Ireland and England’, in Ute Smit, Stefan Dollinger, Julia Hüttner, Ursula Lutzky, Gunther Kaltenböck (eds.). 2007. Tracing English through time: explorations in language variation. Vienna: Braumüller, pp. 179-190.
Hickey, Raymond 2007. ‘Southern Irish English’, in David Britain (ed.) Language in the British Isles. 2nd edition. Cambridge: University Press, pp. 135-51.
Hickey, Raymond 2007. Irish English. Its history and present-day forms. Cambridge University Press.
Hickey, Raymond. 2008. ‘“What strikes the ear” Thomas Sheridan and regional pronunciation’, in Susan Fitzmaurice and Donka Minkova (eds). Proceedings of the SHEL4. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, pp. 385-411.
Hickey, Raymond 2008. ‘Feature loss in 19th century Irish English’, in Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen, Päivi Pahta & Minna Korhonen (eds) The Dynamics of Linguistic Variation: Corpus Evidence on English Past and Present. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 229-243.
Hickey, Raymond 2009. ‘Telling people how to speak. Rhetorical grammars and pronouncing dictionaries’, in Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade and Wim van der Wurff (eds) Current Issues in Late Modern English. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, pp. 89-116
Hickey, Raymond 2010. ‘Weak segments in Irish English’, in Donka Minkova (ed.) Phonological Weakness in English. From Old to Present-day English. (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan), pp. 116-129.
Hickey, Raymond 2010. ‘Modal verbs in English and Irish’, in: Esa Penttilä and Heli Paulasto (eds) Language Contacts meet English Dialects. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 259-274.
Hickey, Raymond 2010. ‘English in eighteenth-century Ireland’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Eighteenth Century English. Ideology and Change. Cambridge: University Press.
Hickey, Raymond 2010. ‘Irish English in early modern drama’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed). Varieties of English in Writing. The Written Word as Linguistic Evidence. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 121-138.
Hickey, Raymond 2010. ‘The Englishes of Ireland. Emergence and transportation’, in: Andy Kirkpatrick (ed.) The Routledge Handbook of World Englishes. London: Routledge, pp. 76-95.
Hickey, Raymond. 2010. ‘Language Contact: Reassessment and reconsideration’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) The Handbook of Language Contact. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 1-28.
Hickey, Raymond. 2010. ‘Contact and language shift’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) The Handbook of Language Contact. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 151-169.
Hickey, Raymond. 2011. ‘The languages of Ireland. An integrated view’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press, pp. 1-48.
Hickey, Raymond 2011. ‘Ulster Scots in present-day Ireland’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press, pp. 291-323.
Hickey, Raymond 2011. ‘Present and future horizons for Irish English’, in Raymond Hickey (ed.) Irish English in Today’s World. Special issue of English Today, Vol 106, June 2011, pp. 3-16.
Hickey, Raymond 2012. ‘Standard Irish English’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Standards of English. Codified Varieties Around the World. Cambridge: University Press.
Hickey, Raymond 2012. ‘English as a contact language in Ireland and Scotland’, in: Marianne Hundt and Daniel Schreier (eds) English as a Contact Language. Cambridge: University Press.
Hickey, Raymond 2012. ‘English in Ireland’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Areal Features of the Anglophone World. Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton.
Hickey, Raymond (ed.) 2011. Irish English in Today’s World. Special issue of English Today.
Hickey, Raymond (ed.) 2011. Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press.
Hilbert, Michaela 2008. ‘Interrogative inversion in non-standard varieties of English’, in: Peter Siemund and Noemi Kintana (eds.), Language Contact and Contact Langua­ges. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
Hogan-Brun, Gabrielle and Stefan Wolff (eds) 2003. Minority Languages in Europe: Frameworks, Status, Prospects. London: Palgrave/Macmillan.
Höhn, Nicole 2012. ‘And they were all like What s going on? New quotatives in Jamaican and Irish English’, in: Marianne Hundt and Ulrike Gut (eds) Mapping Unity and Diversity World-Wide: Corpus-Based Studies of New Englishes. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 263-290.
Huber, Magnus 2003. ‘The Corpus of English in South-East Wales and its synchronic and diachronic implications’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 183-200.
Isaac, Graham 2003. ‘Diagnosing the symptoms of contact: Some Celtic-English case histories’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 46-64.
Jones, Mark J. and Carmen Llamas 2008. ‘Fricated realisations of /t/ in Dublin and Middlesbrough English: an acoustic analysis of plosive frication and surface fricative contrasts’, English Language and Linguistics 12.3: 419-443.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 1999. ‘Irish English and the Ulster Scots controversy’, Ulster Folklife 45: 70-85.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 2005. ‘Silence and mitigation in Irish English discourse’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 47-74.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 2005. ‘Politeness in modern Ireland: “You know the way in Ireland, it’s done without being said”’, in: Leo Hickey and Miranda Stewart (eds) 2005. Politeness in Europe. Clevedon Multilingual Matters, pp. 130-44.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 2005. ‘Internal and external factors in phonological convergence: the case of English /t/ lenition’, in Peter Auer, Frans Hinskens and Paul Kerswill (eds) Dialect change: the convergence and divergence of dialects in contemporary societies (Cambridge: University Press), pp. 51-80.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 2010. ‘Changing landscapes: Language, space, and policy in the Dublin linguistic landscape’, in: Adam Jaworski and Crispin Thurlow (eds), Semiotic Landscapes. Language, Image, Space. (London: Continuum).
Kallen, Jeffrey L. 2012. ‘Ireland’, in: Alexander Bergs and Laurel Brinton (eds) Historical Linguistics of English. Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton.
Kallen, Jeffrey L. and John M. Kirk 2001. ‘Aspects of the verb phrase in Standard Irish English: A corpus-based approach’, in Kirk and Ó Baoill (eds), pp. 59-79.
Kelly-Holmes, Helen 2005. ‘A relevance approach to Irish-English advertising: The case of Brennan’s Bread’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 367-88.
Kemenade, Ans van and Bettelou Los (eds) 2006. The Handbook of the History of English. Oxford: Blackwell.
Kirk, John M. 1999. ‘The dialect vocabulary of Ulster’, Cuadernos de Filolgia Inglesa, 8: 305-34.
Kirk, John M. 2011. ‘What is Irish Standard English’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Irish English in Today’s World. Special issue of English Today, Vol 106, June 2011, pp. 32-38.
Kirk, John M., Jeffrey L. Kallen 2006. ‘Irish Standard English: How standardised? How Celticised?’, in: Hildegard L. C. Tristram (ed.) The Celtic Englishes IV. Potsdam: Potsdamer Universitätsverlag, pp. 88-113.
Kirk, John M., Jeffrey L. Kallen 2007 ‘ICE-Ireland: local variations on global standards’, in: Joan C. Beal, Karen P. Corrigan and Herman Moisl (eds) Creating and Digitizing Language Corpora: Synchronic Databases. London: Palgrave-Macmillan, pp. 121-162.
Kirk, John M., Jeffrey L. Kallen 2007. ‘Assessing Celticity in a corpus of Irish standard English’, in: Hildegard L. C. Tristram (ed.) The Celtic Languages in Contact. Potsdam: Potsdam University Press, pp. 270-298.
Kirk, John M. and Jeffrey L. Kallen 2008. ICE-Ireland: A User’s Guide. Belfast: Cló Ollscoil na Banríona.
Kirk, John M. and Jeffrey L. Kallen 2009. ‘Negation in Irish Standard English: Comparative perspectives’, in Penttilä and Paulasto (eds), pp. 275-296.
Kirk, John M. and Jeffrey L. Kallen 2011. ‘The Cultural Context of ICE-Ireland’, in: Raymond Hickey (ed.) Researching the Languages of Ireland. Uppsala: Uppsala University Press, pp. 269-290.
Kirk, John M. and Dónall P. Ó Baoill (eds) 2002. Travellers and their language. Belfast: Queen’s University Press.
Kirk, John M., Jeffrey L. Kallen, Orla Lowry and A. Rooney 2003. ‘Issues arising from the compilation of ICE-Ireland’, in Belfast Papers in Language and Linguistics 16: 23-41.
Kirk, John M., Jeffrey L. Kallen, Orla Lowry and A. Rooney in press. ‘The compilation of ICE-Ireland: unity versus diversity’, in Antoinette Renouf and A. Kehoe (eds) The changing face of corpus linguistics (Amsterdam: Rodopi).
Kirk, John M. and Dónall Ó Baoill (eds) 2001. Language Links: the Languages of Scotland and Ireland. Belfast Studies in Language, Culture and Politics, 2. Belfast: Queen´s University.
Klemola, Juhani 2002. ‘Periphrastic do: dialectal distribution and origins’, in Filppula, Klemola and Pitkänen (eds), pp. 199-210.
Klemola, Juhani 2003. ‘Personal pronouns in the traditional dialects of the South West of England’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 260-75.
Kortmann, Bernd 2004. ‘Do as a tense and aspect marker in varieties of English’, in Kortmann (ed.), pp. 245-76.
Kortmann, Bernd (ed.) 2004. Dialectology meets typology. Dialect grammar from a cross-linguistic perspective. Berlin: New York.
Kortmann, Bernd, Kate Burridge, Rajend Mesthrie, Edgar W. Schneider and Clive Upton 2004. A Handbook of Varieties of English. Volume 1: Phonology, Volume 2: Morphology and Syntax. Berlin / New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Kortmann, Bernd, Tanja Herrmann, Lukas Pietsch and Susanne Wagner 2004. A Comparative Grammar of British English Dialects: Agreement, Gender, Relative Clauses. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Lange, Claudia 2006. ‘Reflexivity and intensification in Irish English and other New Englishes’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 259-282.
Leerssen, Joep 1996. Mere Irish and Fíor-Ghael. Studies in the idea of Irish nationality, its development and literary expression prior to the nineteenth century. Cork: University Press.
Lenz, Alexandra, Edgar Radtke and Simone Zwickel (eds) 2004. Variation im Raum – Variation in Space. Frankfurt: Peter Lang.
Lillo, Antonio 2004. ‘Exploring rhyming slang in Ireland’, English World-Wide 25.2: 273-85.
Lowry, Orla 2002. ‘The stylistic variation of nuclear patterns in Belfast English’, in Journal of the International Phonetic Association 32.1: 33-42.
Mac Cóil, Liam 2003. ‘Irish - one of the languages of the world’, in Cronin and Ó Cuilleanáin (eds.), pp. 127-47.
Mac Mathúna, Liam 2003. ‘Irish shakes its head? Code-mixing as a textual response to the rise of English as a societal language in Ireland’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 276-97.
Mac Mathúna, Liam 2007. Béarla sa Ghaeilge – Cabhair Choigríche: An Códmheascadh Gaeilge/Béarla i Litríocht na Gaeilge 1600 - 1900. [English in Irish – Foreign help: Irish/English code-switching in Irish literature 1600-1900]. Dublin: An Clóchomhar.
Mac Mathúna, Séamus 2006. ‘Remarks on standardisation in Irish English, Irish and Welsh’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 114-29.
Martin, Gillian 2005. ‘Indirectness in Irish-English business negotiation: A legacy of colonialism’, in Barron and Schneider (eds) , pp. 235-68.
McCafferty, Kevin 2003. ‘Language contact in Early Modern Ireland: The case of be after V-ing as a future gram’, in Cornelia Tschichold (ed.) English core linguistics. Essays in honour of D. J. Allerton (Bern: Peter Lang, 323-42).
McCafferty, Kevin 2003. ‘The Northern Subject Rule in Ulster: how Scots, how English?’, in Language Variation and Change 15: 105–39.
McCafferty, Kevin 2003. ‘“I’ll Bee After Telling Dee de Raison ...”. Be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English, 1601-1750’, in Tristram (ed.), pp. 298-317.
McCafferty, Kevin 2004. ‘Innovation in language contact. Be after V-ing as a future gram in Irish English, 1670 to the Present’, Diachronica 21:1, 113-60.
McCafferty, Kevin 2004. ‘“[T]hunder storms is verry dangese in this countrey they come in less than a minnits notice...”: The Northern Subject Rule in Southern Irish English’, in English World-Wide 25: 51–79.
McCafferty, Kevin 2005. ‘William Carleton between Irish and English: using literary dialect to study language contact and change’, Language and Literature 14.4: 339-62.
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