Adapted from How Death is Handled in Various Cultures Charlotte Kuchinsky



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(Adapted from) How Death is Handled in Various Cultures Charlotte Kuchinsky  

Death is handled different ways in different cultures. Some treat it with utmost reverence. Others prefer to celebrate the life before it. Still others choose to fear it. Let's explore some of the ways that people choose to grieve.



Jewish Culture

Death is inevitable part of life

Guidelines for mourning: parents, siblings, spouses, and children must be mourned.

Burial required within 24 hours w/ a watchman appointed during the wait period

Rending of garments (torn)

Private, simple funerals



Buddhist faith

No need to fear—individual karma determines future lives

No regimented instructions; believed they should be treated with the same respect that was due in life; because they are minimalists this carries over to death rituals—very simple

Ancient Native Americans

Death is a passage into the spirit world and the dead become a part of the forces that surround the living—become nature itself (air, earth, water, fire etc)

Burials vary from tribe to tribe: buried in cave, burned on funeral pyre; secondary burials; mass burials; property burials

Irish

Celebrate life rather than getting too caught up in the death

Hold a traditional grieving period then hold a “party” to celebrate the life of the person—laughing, drinking, having a good time remembering old times



Adapted from) How Death is Handled in Various Cultures Charlotte Kuchinsky  

Death is handled different ways in different cultures. Some treat it with utmost reverence. Others prefer to celebrate the life before it. Still others choose to fear it. Let's explore some of the ways that people choose to grieve.



Jewish Culture

Death is inevitable part of life

Guidelines for mourning: parents, siblings, spouses, and children must be mourned.

Burial required within 24 hours w/ a watchman appointed during the wait period

Rending of garments (torn)

Private, simple funerals



Buddhist faith

No need to fear—individual karma determines future lives

No regimented instructions; believed they should be treated with the same respect that was due in life; because they are minimalists this carries over to death rituals—very simple

Ancient Native Americans

Death is a passage into the spirit world and the dead become a part of the forces that surround the living—become nature itself (air, earth, water, fire etc)

Burials vary from tribe to tribe: buried in cave, burned on funeral pyre; secondary burials; mass burials; property burials

Irish

Celebrate life rather than getting too caught up in the death

Hold a traditional grieving period then hold a “party” to celebrate the life of the person—laughing, drinking, having a good time remembering old times


Adapted from) How Death is Handled in Various Cultures Charlotte Kuchinsky  

Death is handled different ways in different cultures. Some treat it with utmost reverence. Others prefer to celebrate the life before it. Still others choose to fear it. Let's explore some of the ways that people choose to grieve.



Jewish Culture

Death is inevitable part of life

Guidelines for mourning: parents, siblings, spouses, and children must be mourned.

Burial required within 24 hours w/ a watchman appointed during the wait period

Rending of garments (torn)

Private, simple funerals



Buddhist faith

No need to fear—individual karma determines future lives

No regimented instructions; believed they should be treated with the same respect that was due in life; because they are minimalists this carries over to death rituals—very simple

Ancient Native Americans

Death is a passage into the spirit world and the dead become a part of the forces that surround the living—become nature itself (air, earth, water, fire etc)

Burials vary from tribe to tribe: buried in cave, burned on funeral pyre; secondary burials; mass burials; property burials

Irish

Celebrate life rather than getting too caught up in the death

Hold a traditional grieving period then hold a “party” to celebrate the life of the person—laughing, drinking, having a good time remembering old times

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