Academic Positions



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Curriculum Vita

Leslie Anderson

Department of Political Science

University of Florida

Gainesville, FL 32611

352-485-1971/fax: 352-392-8127



email: landerso@polisci.ufl.edu Website: www.clas.ufl.edu/users/anderso
Academic Positions
University of Florida Research Foundation Professor, 2006

Professor, University of Florida, 2006 to present

Associate Professor, University of Florida, 1995-2006

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado, 1988-1995
Education
EDUCATION
University of Michigan, PhD, 1987 Political Science

Major Field: Comparative Politics; First Minor: Public Policy; Second Minor: Population Planning

Dissertation: From Quiescence to Rebellion: Peasant Political Activity in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Dissertation Committee: Daniel Levine, Chair, University of Michigan

James C. Scott, Yale University

Gary Hawes, University of Michigan John Watanabe, (Anthropology) University of Michigan
University of Michigan MPH 1984 Masters in Public Health
University of Michigan MA 1982 Political Science

Thesis: Measuring Economic Development in Cuba

Advisor: Ernest Wilson
Bowdoin College BA 1979 Government

junior year: University of Stockholm, Sweden (conversation/reading in Swedish)

junior summer: Alliance Francaise, Paris (fluency in French)
Bilingual School for Language and Culture Training

Cuernavaca Mexico, 1980 (fluency in Spanish)
Publications
books
The Political Ecology of the Modern Peasant: Calculation and Community, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994 (selected for Best Book Award, Transformational Politics Section, American Political Science Association and for Outstanding Book Award, Choice academic magazine)
Learning Democracy: Citizen Engagement and Electoral Choice in Nicaragua, 1990-1996, with Lawrence C. Dodd, University of Chicago Press, 2005. (semi-finalist for Grawemeyer Award, 2006.) (Learning Democracy sold over 900 copies in its first year and is into its second printing.)
Learning Democracy: Citizen Engagement and Electoral Choice in Nicaragua, 1990-2001, by Leslie E. Anderson and Lawrence C. Dodd
The modern history of Nicaragua is mired in poverty and political conflict, yet the country has become a model for the successful emergence of democracy in a developing nation. Learning Democracy tells the story of how Nicaragua overcame an authoritarian government and American interventionism by engaging in an electoral revolution that solidified its democratic self-governance.

By analyzing nationwide surveys conducted during the 1990, 1996, and 2001 Nicaraguan presidential elections, Leslie E. Anderson and Lawrence C. Dodd provide insight into one of the most unexpected and intriguing recent advancements in third world politics. They offer a balanced account of the voting patterns and forward-thinking decisions that led Nicaraguans to first support the reformist Sandinista revolutionaries only to replace them with a conservative democratic regime a few years later. Addressing issues largely unexamined in Latin American studies, Learning Democracy is a unique and probing look at how the country’s mass electorate moved beyond revolutionary struggle to establish a more stable democratic government by realizing the vital role of citizens in democratization processes.
I can hardly exaggerate my sense of the importance of this book’s conclusions, not only for political scientists and others concerned with understanding transitions to democracy, but for policy makers as well. Learning Democracy is strikingly original and more hopeful than most interpretations and forecasts.”

Robert A. Dahl, author of On Democracy
Social Capital in Developing Democracies: Nicaragua and Argentina Compared (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
Democratization By Institutions: Argentina’s Transition Years in Comparative Perspective, (manuscript in progress)

Refereed articles
1) “Democracy and Oppositional Consciousness in Argentina,” forthcoming, Polity, April, 2014
2) Poverty and Political Empowerment: Local Citizen Political Participation as a Path Toward Social Justice in Nicaragua,” The Forum on Public Policy, December, 2010, Vol 1, # 2101, pp 1-19
3) “Single-Party Predominance in an Unconsolidated Democracy: The Example of Argentina,” Perspectives on Politics, December, 2009, Vol 7, # 4, pp 767-784.
4) “Nicaragua: Progress Amid Regress?” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Journal of Democracy, July, 2009, Vol 20, # 3, pp 153-167, republished in Spanish with the title “Nicaragua: Progreso en Medio de Retroceso?, Journal of Democracy en Espanol, Spanish version, Julio, 2010, Vol 2, pp 168-184.

This essay in its original, English version elicited a critique from Samuel Green. At the invitation of the JOD, we responded to Green in Leslie E. Anderson and Lawrence C. Dodd, “Taking the Study of Nicaraguan Politics Seriously: A Response to Green,” Journal of Democracy Web Notes, May, 2010.
5) “The Authoritarian Executive? Horizontal and Vertical Accountability in A New Democracy: A Nicaraguan Perspective,” Latin American Politics and Society, Summer, 2006.
6) “Fascism or Revolution: Left and Right Politics of the Rural Poor,” International Political Science Review, April, 2006.
7) “Democratie Envers et Contre Tout,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Revue Le Banquet, (Paris) October/November, 2004.
8) “Post-socialist Democratization: The Cases of Hungary and Nicaragua Compared,” with Michael Lewis-Beck and Mary Stegmaier, Electoral Studies, September, 2003.
9) “Of Wild and Cultivated Politics: Conflict and Democracy in Argentina,” International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, Vol 16, # 1, Fall, 2002.
10) “Nicaragua Votes: The Elections of 2001,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Journal of Democracy, Vol 13, # 3, July, 2002.
11) “Comportamiento Electoral y Democracia en Nicaragua: 1990-2001, with Lawrence C. Dodd, America Latina Hoy, (Salamanca) Vol 30, April, 2002.
12) “Fascistas o Revolucionarios? Politica Izquierdista y Derechista de la Poblacion Pobre Rural, Politica y Sociedad, # 38, (Madrid), September-December, 2001, pp 129-151. (This paper was originally presented at the International Conference of Sociology, Salamanca, Spain, September, 2001. A shorter version of this essay was published in the United States in 2006.)
13) “Between Quiescence and Rebellion Among the Peasantry,” Journal of Theoretical Politics, October, 1997
14) “Radicalism and Reformism in a Democratic Context,” with Mitchell Seligson, American Journal of Political Science, November, 1994.
15) “Neutrality and Bias in the 1990 Nicaraguan Pre-Electoral Polls,” American Journal of Political Science, May, 1994.
16) “Agrarian Politics and Revolution: Micro and State Perspectives on Structural Determinism,” Journal of Theoretical Politics, October, 1993.
17) “Surprises and Secrets: Lessons from the 1990 Nicaraguan Election,” Studies in Comparative International Development, Fall, 1992
18) “Mixed Blessings: Disruption and Organization Among Costa Rican Peasant Unions,” Latin American Research Review, March, 1991

published in Spanish, Revista de Historia, San Jose, Costa Rica, September, 1992
19) “Post-Materialism from a Peasant Perspective: Political Motivation in Costa Rica and Nicaragua,” Comparative Political Studies, March, 1990
20) “Alternative Action: Peasants as Positive Participants,” Journal of Latin American Studies, February, 1990
refereed book chapters and invited articles
1) “Graduate Education in a Pluralist Context: The Metaphor of a Tool Box,” in Kristen Renwick Monroe, editor, Perestroika! The Jumbled, Raucous, Liberating Revolution in Political Science, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2005.
2) “Idealism, Impatience and Pessimism: Studies of Democratization in Latin America,” Latin American Research Review, 2005
3) “The Legislature as a Reflection of Democracy,” Extension of Remarks, Legislative Studies Section Newsletter, American Political Science Association, July, 1995.

published in Spanish, Pais, Managua, Nicaragua, May, 1996.
4) “Chameleons and Camouflage: Reading the 1990 Nicaraguan Pre-electoral Polls,” in John Booth and Mitchell Seligson, eds. Democracy and Elections in Central America, 2nd ed, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1995

published in Spanish, Envio, Managua, Nicaragua, June, 1996
Book reviews
1) Empire of Difference, The Ottomans in Comparative Perspective, by Karen Barkey, Cambridge University Press, 2008; Lineages of Despotism And Development: British Colonialism and State Power, by Matthew Lange, University of Chicago Press, 2009; and Colonialism and Postcolonial Development: Spanish America in Comparative Perspective, by James Mahoney, Cambridge University Press, 2010, Perspectives on Politics, 2011.

2) The Endurance of National Constitutions, by Zachary Elkins, Tom Ginsburg and James Melton, Cambridge University Press, Comparative Political Studies, March, 2011

3) Political Movements and Violence in Central America, by Charles Brockett,Cambridge University Press, International Public Opinion Quarterly, 2007

4) Bounded Missions: Military Regimes and Democratization in the Southern Cone and Brazil, by Craig L. Arceneaux, University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001, The Americas, 2003

5) Democracy and the Public Space in Latin America, by Leonardo Avritzer, Princeton, N.J., Princeton University Press, 2002, Political Studies January, 2003

6) Empowering Women: Land and Property Rights in Latin America, by Carmen Diana Deere and Magdalena Leon. Pittsburgh: The University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001, and Still Fighting: The Nicaraguan Women’s Movement, 1977-2000, by Katherine Isbester. Pittsburgh: The University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001. American Political Science Review, December, 2002.

7) Undermining the Sandinista Revolution, edited by Gary Prevost and Harry E. Vanden, New York, St. Martin’s Press, 1997 The Americas, April, 2002

8) The New Politics of Inequality In Latin America: Rethinking Participation and Representation, by Douglas A. Chalmers, Carlos M. Vilas, Katherine Hite, Scott B. Martin, Kerianne Piester, and Monique Segarra, Journal of Politics, Vol 61, # 2, 1999

9) Managing the Commanding Heights: Nicaragua’s State Enterprises, by Forrest Colburn, The Hispanic American Historical Review, Vol 72, # 1, February, 1992

10) Power and Protest: Latin American Social Movements, ed by Susan Eckstein,

The Hispanic American Historical Review, Vol 72, # 1, February, 1992

11) Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance, edited by Forrest Colburn, New York, M.E. Sharpe, 1990, in Studies in Comparative International Development, Vol 26, # 3, Fall, 1991.

12) Elections and Democracy In Central America, by John Booth and Mitchell Seligson,

Political Science Quarterly, Vol 105, # 2, Summer, 1990
Newspaper articles and interviews
Boulder Camera, 1995

Gainesville Sun, 2000

New York Times, 2000

Buenos Aires Herald, interview, 2001
National Fellowships, Research Grants, Scholarly Awards
1) Fulbright Fellowship, Argentina, University of Buenos Aires, 2008

2) National Science Foundation Grant, 2006, co-PI with Lawrence Dodd, to study 2006 Nicaraguan election

3) Brown University, Howard Foundation Fellowship, 1997-98

4) National Science Foundation Grant, 1996, individual award to study 1996 Nicaraguan election

5) Best Book Award, American Political Science Association, Transformational Politics Section,1995

4) Outstanding Book Award, Choice academic magazine, 1995

5) Teaching Award, Best Professor Selection, International Affairs Club, University of Colorado, 1995

6) Fulbright Fellowship, Argentina, 1993

7) Council of Creative Writing Research Grant, University of Colorado, for conference on “Dimensions of Peasant Power,” University of Colorado, 1992

8) Social Science Writing Award (awarded twice) 1991, 1992

9) Kellogg Institute, University of Notre Dame, Faculty Fellowship, Spring, 1990

10) Cornell University, Visiting Fellowship, Fall, 1990.

11) Fulbright Fellowship, Costa Rica, 1985
I am also been listed as the Primary Investigator for several dissertation grants where I have been the supervisor and Dissertation Chair. See section on Graduate Committee Section
University Fellowships, Grants, Awards
1) University of Florida Doctoral Dissertation Advisor/Mentor Award, 2014 (University-wide)

2) Humanities Fellowship, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, 2012, to conduct field research in Nicaragua.

3) Humanities Research Award, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, 2007, to conduct field research in Nicaragua.

4) University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship, 2006

5) Humanities Research Award, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, 2001

6) Departmental Travel Award, Department of Political Science, University of Florida, 2001

7) Departmental Research Award, Department of Political Science, University of Florida, 2000

8) Teaching Award, Best Professor Selection, International Affairs Club, University of Colorado, 1995

9) Social Science Writing Award, University of Colorado, 1991, for “Post-Materialism from a Peasant Perspective: Political Motivation in Costa Rica and Nicaragua,” Comparative Political Studies, March, 1990

10) Social Science Writing Award, University of Colorado, 1992, for “Mixed Blessings: Disruption and Organization Among Costa Rican Peasant Unions,” Latin American Research Review, March, 1991

11) Council on Creative Writing Research Grant, University of Colorado, for research conference on “The Dimensions of Peasant Power,” University of Colorado, 1992

12) Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, Dissertation Grant, 1986

INVITED MEMBERSHIPS
Scholar’s Strategy Network, (SSN) Harvard University
INVITED LECTURES and CONFERENCE PAPERS
1) Latin American Studies Association, Chicago, upcoming in May, 2014, Round Table on “Pluralism, Religion and Democracy: The Work of Daniel H. Levine” upcoming, May, 2014

2) University of Florida, Graduate Student Council, Social Capital it Developing Democracies, March, 2013

2) University of Texas, Austin, Social Capital it Developing Democracies, January, 2013

3) Bowdoin College, “Democracy and the Welfare State in Argentina,” 2011.

4) Rochester University, “Municipal and National Politics in Nicaragua’s Developing Democracy,” with Lawrence Dodd, 2011.

5) Latin American Studies Association, international conference, “The Caviar Riots: The Moral Economy and Social Capital in Argentina.” Toronto, October, 2010.

6) Oxford Round Table on Social Justice, “Poverty and Political Empowerment in Nicaragua, July 2010

7) Bowdoin College, “The 2008 Municipal Elections in Nicaragua,” May, 2009

8) International Political Science Association, Santiago, Chile, “Elections and Democracy in Latin America,” July, 2009, invitation declined

9) University of La Matanza, Argentina, “Nicaragua in Contemporary International Affairs,” March, 2008.

10) University of Notre Dame, Learning Democracy, Spring, 2002

11) University of Michigan, Department of Political Science, Learning Democracy, February, 2002

12) Yale University, Center for Agrarian Studies, Learning Democracy, October, 2000

13) University of Washington, Seattle, Learning Democracy, October, 2001

14) Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, on Methods and Methodology in Rural Fieldwork, September, 1990

15) University of Minnesota, The Political Ecology of the Modern Peasant, March, 1990

16) Cornell University, The Political Ecology of the Modern Peasant, February, 1990
RECENT AND UPCOMING CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
1) Subnational Government in Nicaragua: Democratic Influence or No?, upcoming, American Political Science Association, Washington DC, August 28-31, 2014

This paper will be presented as part of a panel I have organized on Subnational Government and Democratization, panel accepted by the American Political Science Association, March 13, 2014.

2) Round Table in Honor of the Work of Robert Putnam: Social Capital Two Decades On, upcoming, American Political Science Association, Washington DC, August 28-31, 2014

This presentation will be part of the comments made at this round table, which I organized. Round Table accepted by the American Political Science Association, March 13, 2014.

3) “Local Autonomy and Foreign Direct Donations to Municipal Government in Nicaragua,” with Won-ho Park, Southern Political Science Association, January 9-11, 2014, New Orleans, LA.

4) International Contributions to Nicaraguan Democracy: The Role of Foreign Municipal Donations for Social Development, with Won-ho Park, Spanish Political Science Association, September 18-20, 2014, Seville, Spain

5) Centralization and Decentralization: Municipal Political Autonomy and Democratization in Nicaragua, Society for Latin American Studies, St Andrews, Scotland, England, April 8-10, 2011.

6)“Electoral Democracy in Nicaragua: From Ideology to Pragmatism: The Value of Local Politics in Fostering Democratic Stability,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA, January, 2008

7) “A Nip and Tuck Victory: The 2006 Nicaraguan Election,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, presented at the American Political Science Association, Chicago, August, 2007

8)”The 2006 Nicaraguan Election: National and Municipal Perspectives,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Latin American Studies Association, Montreal, Canada, September, 2007

9)”The Role of Electoral Observers in Fostering Democratization in Nicaragua,” Conference on Democracy and Electoral Observation, University of Florida, November, 2007.

10) “Death of a Nobel Ideal: The Radical Party and Democracy in Argentina,” Latin American Studies Association, San Juan, Puerto Rica, March, 2006

11) “Nicaragua’s Upcoming 2006 Election Viewed from the Perspective of Learning Democracy,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, Latin American Studies Association, San Juan, Puerto Rica, March, 2006

12) “Learning Democracy: The Decision-making Capacities of Mass Citizens Amidst Crisis--The Evidence from Three Presidential Elections in Nicaragua, 1990-2001,” with Lawrence Dodd, American Political Science Association, Washington D.C., September, 2005

13) “Learning Democracy: Democratization Theory, Macro-historical Context, and Processes of Democratization--Lessons from Nicaragua,” with Lawrence Dodd, Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, Il, April, 2005 (This paper has been nominated for consideration for the Best Paper Award for the Midwest Political Science Meetings for 2005.)

14) “Learning Democracy: The Decision-making Capacities of Mass Citizens Amidst Crisis--The Evidence from Three Presidential Elections in Nicaragua, 1990-2001,” with Lawrence Dodd, Midwest Political Science Assocation, Chicago, Il., April, 2005

15) “Learning Democracy: Historical Perspectives on the 1990-2001 elections,” with Lawrence Dodd, Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, Il., April, 2005

16) “Pluralist Methods in Graduate Study of Political Science,” Graduate Student Conference, Department of Political Science, University of Florida, March, 2005, Discussant for Fuzzy Data Set Research

17) “The Heart of Darkness: A Study of a Fascist Personality,” with Guillermina Seri, Northeastern Political Science Association, Boston, November, 2004

18) “The Role of Pre-Democratic Political Parties in Democratic Transition: The Case of Nicaragua,” Latin American Studies Association, Las Vegas, Utah, October, 2004

19) “A Tale of Two Neighborhoods: Bridging and Bonding Social Capital in Urban Communities: Argentina and Nicaragua Compared,” American Political Science Association, Chicago, August, 2004

20) “Fascism or Revolution: Rural Politics in New Democracies,” American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, August, 2003

21) “What Difference Could a Revolution Make? Democratic Values in Nicaragua and Peru,” with Jorge Aragon, Latin American Studies Association, Dallas, March, 2003

22) “The Role of Graduate Education in the Perestroika Movement in Political Science: The Metaphor of a Toolbox,” American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, August, 2003

23) “Partidos En Transicion en Nicaragua: La Contribucion de Partidos Pre-democraticos a Una Nueva Democracia,” Central American Congress of Political Science, San Jose, Costa Rica, August 12-14, 2003

24)“Trust and Rivalry in A New Democracy: Bridging and Bonding Social Capital in Nicaragua and Argentina,” International Political Science Association, Durban, South Africa, June 30-July 3, 2003

25) ”Le Rol des Parties Politiques Dans les Nouveau Democracies du Sud,” French Political Science Association, Lille, France, September, 2002

26) “Learning Democracy: Nicaraguan Electoral Politics, 1990-2001,” with Lawrence C. Dodd, American Political Science Association, Boston, 2002

27) “Metodologia Mixta en el Estudio de America Latina,” 1st Latin American Conference of Political Science, Salamanca, Spain, July, 2002

28) “Fascistas o Revolucionarios? Politica Izquierdista y Derechista de la Poblacion Pobre Rural en Europa y America Latina, VII International Congress of the Spanish Sociological Association, Salamanca, Spain, September, 2001

29) “Learning Democracy: the 1990 and 1996 Nicaraguan Elections, with Lawrence C. Dodd,

VII Interntional Congress of the Spanish Sociological Association, Salamanca, Spain, September, 2001

30) “Learning Democracy, the 1996 Nicaraguan Election,” Latin American Studies Association, Washington, D.C. September, 2001

31) “Learning Democracy: the 1990 Nicaraguan Election,” with Lawrence C Dodd, American Political Science Association, Washington, D.C. September, 2000
Graduate Committee Service
Dissertation Committees Chaired
1) Melanie Mason (graduated, University of Colorado,1993, NCAR Research Institute, Boulder, CO)
2) Edward Greaves (graduated, University of Florida, 2002, St Cloud State University. Ed received a Fulbright Dissertation Grant)
3) Vilma Fuentes (graduated, University of Florida, 2003, Santa Fe Community College. Vilma received a Dissertation Fellowship from the Institute for the Study of World Peace. I am listed as the PI for this grant.)
4) Lee Walker (graduated, University of Florida, 2003, University of Kentucky, 2003. Lee received a fellowship from Harvard University, 2006 and is now at the University of South Carolina.)
5) Larissa Ruiz Baia (graduated, University of Florida, 2004, Lynn University. Larissa received a Social Science Research Council Dissertation Award and a Brooklyn College Dissertation Fellowship.)
6) Javier Aguayo (graduated, University of Florida, 2004, York College. Javier received a Dickenson College Post-Doctoral Fellowship, 2004-5.)
7) Guillermina Seri (graduated, University of Florida, 2005, Union College. Guillermina received a McQuown Dissertation Fellowship and a two-year Post-doctoral Fellowship from Colgate University, 2005-7)
8) Jorge Aragon, (graduated, University of Florida, 2006, University of Missouri, St Louis)
9) Jonathan Jones (graduated, University of Florida, May, 2009, University of Florida) Jonathan won a National Science Foundation Dissertation Grant to do research on Duty Free Economic Zones, Labor Participation, and the Decline of Democracy in India. I am listed as the PI for this grant. Jonathan also won a CLAS Dissertation Fellowship to complete the writing of his dissertation.
10) Jetsabe Caceres (graduated, University of Florida, May, 2010, University of Toledo, Ohio) Jetsabe received a Fellowship from the Ministry for Puerto Rican Development and two Supplemental Dissertation Awards from the University of Florida.)




11) Ani de la Quintana (graduated, University of Florida, December, 2011)
12) Ingrid Erikson (graduated, University of Florida, December, 2011)
13) Audrey Flemming, (ABD, currently writing) Audrey’s dissertation is on film and democracy in Cuba.
14) Upohar Haroon, (ABD, currently writing) Upohar won a McQuown Dissertation Fellowship for her doctoral research in Bangladesh. Her dissertation is on women’s health and political empowerment.
15) Chesney McComber, (ABD, preparing to do fieldwork in Morocco and Kenya) Chesney’s dissertation is on women’s leadership in peasant villages in Morocco and Kenya. She has won a United States Borlaug Fellowship to do her research this coming year.
16) Kokila Mendis, (ABD, scheduled to defend her dissertation prospectus on

April 15, 2014). Koki’s dissertation is on Moslem immigrant women and racial prejudice in Sweden. Koki has won a Malmberg Fellowship to do her research in Sweden.
Dissertation committee, member
Oneida Mascarenas (graduated, University of Colorado,1993)

Kelley Daniel (graduated, University of Colorado, 1994)

William Moore (graduated, University of Colorado,1994)

Daniel Ottomeier (graduated, University of Florida, 1997)

Shawn Bird (graduated, University of Florida, 2000)

Parak Hoon (graduated, University of Florida, 2006)

Indira Rampersaad (graduated, University of Florida, 2007)

Stephen Boyle (graduated, University of Florida, 2007)

Hans Schmeisser (graduated, University of Florida, 2011)

Lance Bardsley (graduated, University of Florida, 2012)

Chris Manick (ABD, University of Florida, 2013)

Fred Boateng, (ABD, School of Education, University of Florida, outside committee member] 2014)
Masters committee, Chair
Tina Reid (graduated, University of Florida, 1996)

Lee Walker (graduated, University of Florida, 1997)

Elwaleed Mousa (graduated, University of Florida, 1999)

Jorge Aragon (graduated, University of Florida, 2000)

Maria Mora (graduated, University of Florida, 2006)

Emilia Gioreva (graduated, University of Florida, 2007)

Zaynep Ataley (graduated, University of Florida, 2010)
Masters committee, Member
Sergio Cabrera (graduated, University of Florida, spring, 2008)

Ana Lima (graduated, University of Florida, spring, 20110

Nathalia Hernandez Ochoa (graduated, University of Florida, spring, 2013)
Service to the Profession
1) Nominating Committee, Women’s Caucus for Political Science, 2013 to present

2) Southern Political Science Association, Endowments Committee, 2013 to present

3) Heinz Eulau Award Committee, American Political Science Association, 2011-2012

4) Southern Political Science Association, Treasurer, 2010-2013

5) Southern Political Science Association, Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession in the South, 2010.

6) Midwest Political Science Association, Member, Best Paper Award Committee, 2010

7) American Political Science Association, Comparative Democratization Section, Vice-Chair, 2008-10, elected August, 2008

8) Southern Political Science Association, Endowments Committee, appointed June, 2007

9) American Political Science Association, Comparative Democratization Section, Chair, Best Dissertation Fieldwork Award Committee, 2006.

10) American Political Science Association, Trust and Development Committee, Three year term: 2002-2004

11) American Political Science Association, Comparative Democratization Section, Treasurer, elected September, 2001

2) Heinz Eulau Award Committee, 1994-5
Courses Taught at the University of Florida (for further details see Teaching section of website)
Doctoral Level Courses Taught
1) Conduct of Inquiry. This is an introduction to research methods, both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods. It includes an introduction to in-depth interviewing, participant observation, focus groups, survey research, archival research, and online data sources. I have taught this course each fall since 1998, excepting 2005. This course is required of all incoming doctoral students in the Political Science Department at the University of Florida. This course is a service for the entire department.
2) Introduction to Comparative Politics, I created this course for the Department of Political Science in 1995, at the request of the field Chair (Goran Hyden) It is required of all doctoral students in Political Science who major or minor in Comparative Politics. This course introduces students the literature in the field of Comparative Politics. This course is a service for the Comparative Field.
3) Qualitative Methods. This course is part of the course roster for the Methodology field and fulfills requirements for the Methodology major or minor for doctoral students in Political Science. I first taught this course in the spring of 2002 and have taught it every other year from then on. This course covers the use of focus groups, content analysis, discourse analysis, archival research and participant observation all in greater depth than covered in the Conduct of Inquiry course (# 1 above). This is a service course for the Methods Field.
4) Democracy and Its Competitors. This course is an advanced elective seminar for doctoral students and fulfills requirements for the major and minor in Comparative Politics. The course is considered a “thematic” course, as opposed to a regional-specific course, and covers several regions of the world. These include the United States, Western Europe, Latin America and Africa.
5) Peasant Politics and Society. This course is also an advanced elective seminar for doctoral students and fulfills requirements for the major and minor in comparative Politics. This course is also considered a “thematic” course, as opposed to a regional-specific course, and covers several regions of the world. These include Latin America, Africa, and Asia, including south and southeast Asia as well as China.
Note: At the University of Florida I have taught a graduate seminar in Latin American Politics only once. I taught that class regularly at the University of Colorado. I am able to teach that course but have not needed to do so at Florida.

Undergraduate Courses Taught: Upper Division (juniors/seniors)
1) Latin American Politics. This is an overview course covering several different countries and considering the political situation in each.
2) Modern Mexico. This course considers the authoritarian PRI regime and how it lasted as long as it did, including its basis in the Mexican Revolution. The course then scrutinizes Mexico’s recent and problematic transition to democracy, both its achievements and its limitations.
3) Argentina and the Politics of Memory. This course considers how the recent past of authoritarianism and human rights continues to influence the modern democracy of today.
4) Problems in Latin American Politics: Human Rights in Comparative Perspective. This course compares responses to gross human rights violations in Argentina, Chile, El Salvador, South Africa and Germany.
Undergraduate Courses Taught: Lower Division (freshmen/sophomores)
1) Comparative Politics. This course is a basic introduction to comparative politics and is required of all majors and minors in political science at the University of Florida
Service to the University of Florida
1) Graduate Coordinator (Director of Graduate Studies), Department of Political Science, July, 2013-present

2) Tenure and Promotion Committee, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, October, 2008-10

3) Chair, Summer Field Grants Awards Committee, Center for Latin American Studies

4) Admissions Committee, Center for Latin American Studies, 2006

5) Department of Political Science, Merit Committee, 2003-5

6) Comparative Field Chair, 1998 to 2005

7) Department of Political Science, Search Committee, 2000

8) TCD Field Grant Awards Committee, 1996

9) Tinker Foundation Awards Committee, Latin American Studies Center, 2001

10) Comparative Junior Search Committee, Political Science, 1999
Service to the University of Colorado
1) Comparative Politics Junior Search Committee, Political Science, 1990

2) Comparative Politics Senior Search Committee, Political Science, 1991
References are available from:
Nancy Bermeo

Nuffield Chair in Comparative Politics

Oxford University
Rodney Hero

Department of Political Science

University of California, Berkeley
Bryan Jones

Pickle Chair in Congressional Studies

Department of Government

University of Texas
Daniel Levine

Emeritus Professor

Department of Political Science

University of Michigan
Michael Lewis-Beck

Department of Political Science

University of Iowa
Cynthia McClintock

Distinguished Professor of Political Science

Department of Political Science

George Washington University
Theda Skocpol

Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology

Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Department of Government

Harvard University


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