3rd Grade 5 Day Unit Carrie Kramer and Erin Trimble November 26, 2013 tedu 414 Who Sailed The Ocean Blue?



Download 139.33 Kb.
Date25.05.2016
Size139.33 Kb.
#67798
Who Sailed The Ocean Blue Unit

3rd Grade

5 Day Unit

Carrie Kramer and Erin Trimble

November 26, 2013

TEDU 414
Who Sailed The Ocean Blue?

A Unit Plan Based on the Early European Explorers

Third Grade
Introduction

This unit will cover SOL 3.3 based on the early european explorers. The first 3 days will focus on learning Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, Juan Ponce de Leon, and Christopher Newport. Students will be able to determine each explorers needs for exploration and their accomplishments by the time the unit is finished.  This unit will also address map skills (drawing the explorer’s journeys on a world map and labeling the continents) and language arts (writing a news story about our favorite explorer after performing interviews).  



Unit Objectives

  • The students will be able to differentiate and identify the reasons of exploration for each explorer. (Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon, Jacques Cartier, and Christopher Newport)

  • The students will be able to differentiate and identify the accomplishments that came for each explorer’s exploration. (Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon, Jacques Cartier and Christopher Newport)

  • The students will be able to label the journeys of each explorer on a U.S. map. (Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon, Jacques Cartier and Christopher Newport)

Specific Objectives

  • The student will be able to identify the definitions of explorer and European when given an exit card with 100% accuracy.

  • The student will be able to identify one accomplishment and one reason for Christopher Columbus's exploration when given an exit card with 100% accuracy.

  • The student will be able to identify the accomplishments and reasons for exploration for Juan Ponce de Leon, Christopher Columbus and Jacques Cartier while playing a board game with 100% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to identify the purpose and journey of Christopher Newport, Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier when given information through a promethean board game with 100% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to identify Spain, England, and France when given a world map with 100% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to draw the routes of Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, Juan Ponce de Leon, and Christopher Newport when given instruction with 100% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to illustrate an understanding in a literary piece on a given explorer with 100% accuracy in a news article including the reasons for exploration and the accomplishments of the explorer they are assigned.

  • The students will be able to construct a newspaper article with beginning, middle, and end about their assigned explorer.

  • The students will be able to answer questions 98% correctly when given a set of choices and  asked aloud by teacher during a reveiw game.


Standards of Learning

History 3.3 The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques

Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and

the impact of the travels on American Indians.


Geography 3.5 The student will develop map skills by

a) positioning and labeling the seven continents and five oceans to create a world map;

b) using the equator and prime meridian to identify the Northern, Southern, Eastern, and

Western Hemispheres;

c) locating the countries of Spain, England, and France;

d) locating the regions in the Americas explored by Christopher Columbus (San Salvador in

the Bahamas), Juan Ponce de León (near St. Augustine, Florida), Jacques Cartier (near

Quebec, Canada), and Christopher Newport (Jamestown, Virginia);

e) locating specific places, using a simple letter-number grid system.
Writing 3.9 The student will write for a variety of purposes.  

a) Identify the intended audience.  

b) Use a variety of prewriting strategies.  

c) Write a clear topic sentence focusing on the main idea.  

d) Write a paragraph on the same topic.  

e) Use strategies for organization of information and elaboration according to the

type of writing.  

f) Include details that elaborate the main idea.

g) Revise writing for clarity of content using specific vocabulary and information.
Physical Education 3.1 The student will apply locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills in increasingly complex movement activities.

a) Demonstrate most of the critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement)

for manipulative skills (e.g., throw and catch a variety of objects, kick to stationary and moving

partners/objects, dribble with dominant hand/foot, pass a ball to a moving partner).

b) Use manipulative skills in movement combinations (e.g., perform manipulative tasks while

dodging and moving in different pathways; catch a rolled ball while moving, and throw it back

to a partner).

c) Demonstrate moving to a rhythm (e.g., perform simple dances in various formations, develop

and refine a creative educational dance sequence).

d) Refine individual gymnastics skills, and perform educational gymnastic sequences with

balance, transfer of weight, travel, and change of direction.
Visual Arts 3.6 The student will create works of art that communicate ideas, themes, and feelings.
C/T 3-5.1 Demonstrate an operational knowledge of various technologies.

a) Use various types of technology devices to perform learning tasks.

• Use a keyboard, mouse, touch screen, touchpad, and other input devices to

interact with a computer.

• Demonstrate the ability to perform a wide variety of basic tasks using

technology, including saving, editing, printing, viewing, and graphing.

b) Communicate about technology with appropriate terminology.

• Use basic technology vocabulary in daily practice.

Who Sailed the Ocean Blue? Part 1

Purpose

The purpose of this lesson will be to introduce the idea of exploration and Europeans. It will also cover one of the most famous explorers, Christopher Columbus.

History SOL 3.3

The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and the impact of the travels on American Indians.



Objectives

  • The student will be able to identify the definitions of explorer and European when given an exit card with 100% accuracy.

  • The student will be able to identify one accomplishment and one reason for Christopher Columbus's exploration when given an exit card with 100% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction



  • Start a rumor at the beginning of the day  among a few students that there is some gold on the playground.

  • Hide some gold chocolate coins on the playground in a really good spot.

  • When history starts explain that you will be dividing students up based on countries (have a Spain group, an English group and a French group).

  • Take the students to the playground and instruct them to find the gold. (Kinesthetic)

  • Upon returning to class have a discussion about exploration: (Auditory)

    • Do you know what it means to explore?

    • What were some difficulties you encountered when looking for the golden coins?

    • What do you think an explorer is?

  • Explain the definition of explorer for the to write on their foldable notes

    • A person who travels seeking new discoveries.

  • Ask: what do you think it means to be a European?

  • Give them the definition to put on the foldable notes: (Visual, Auditory)

    • A person from one of the countries in Europe.

Development

  • Explain that in the next week we will be learning about several explorers who happened to be Europeans.

  • Play the song "Discoverin' America" (found on YouTube) as a sneak peak to what's coming in the next few days. (Auditory)

  • Read the book 1492 by Jean Marzollo and instruct them to listen for some of the information that can be filled in on their foldable notes. (Auditory, Visual)

  • Upon finishing the book, engage in a classroom discussion. (Auditory)

    • Who was Columbus?

    • Where was he from?

    • Why did he decide to go exploring?

    • Did he find what he was looking for?

    • Where did he end up?

  • Make sure to write the information on the board so everyone has the correct things written in their foldable. (Visual)

Summary

  • Go over the definitions of explorer and European again.

  • Explain that Columbus is the first of 4 explorers we will be learning about!

  • Ask if anyone has any questions.

  • Hand out exit cards (see evaluation part A)

For Advanced Learners: Instruct them to find awesome facts about columbus to share with their classmates. Give them encyclopedias and books about columbus to use.

For Struggling Learners: Provide extra support or allow them to compare notes with a partner upon finishing the read aloud before you begin discussion.



Materials

  • Chocolate golden coins

  • Foldable notes sheet for each student

  • The book 1492 by Jean Marzollo

  • The youtube video “Discoverin’ America” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWY50mH5awQ

  • Exit cards

  • Encyclopedias (Kid Friendly)

  • Books about Columbus

Evaluation Part A

  • Hand out an exit card to everyone with the definitions of explorer and European on it.

  • Instruct the students to identify which definition is which and write one of Columbus's reasons for exploring and one of his accomplishments.

Evaluation Part B

What were the strengths of the lesson?

What were the weaknesses?

How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?


Some inspiration for this lesson was pulled from: http://www.proteacher.org/c/367_explorers.html Name:___________

Exit Card

Write the correct answer in front of the matching definition.

____________: A person who travels seeking new discoveries.

____________: A person from one of the countries in Europe.

Give me one reason and one achievement from Christopher Columbus’s voyage.


Name:____________

Exit Card

Write the correct answer in front of the matching definition.

____________: A person who travels seeking new discoveries.

____________: A person from one of the countries in Europe.

Give me one reason and one achievement from Christopher Columbus’s voyage.
Who Sailed the Ocean Blue? Part 2

Purpose

The purpose of this lesson will be to continue our unit on explorers and introduce 2 new explorers. Students will be learning about Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier during this lesson as well as playing board games to refresh what we have covered in the last 2 days.

History SOL 3.3

The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and the impact of the travels on American Indians.



Objectives

  • The student will be able to identify the accomplishments and reasons for exploration for Juan Ponce de Leon, Christopher Columbus and Jacques Cartier while playing a board game with 100% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction



  • Today we will be learning about Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier as well as reviewing what we have learned about Christopher Columbus.

  • Does anyone know who Juan Ponce de Leon is?

  • How about Jacques Cartier?

  • The students will be divided into groups of 4 to play board games based on the explorers.

    • There will be several copies of a board game for each, Juan Ponce de Leon, Jacques Cartier and Christopher Columbus.

    • There will be 3 different rotations to ensure that each group has a chance to learn and play a game corresponding to each explorer (visual, auditory)

    • Each student will be responsible for recording facts they may think will be important on a recording sheet.

  • After 3 rotations we will come back together as a class to discuss what we have learned.

Development

  • Before discussing our information and filling in our foldables the students will participate in a "Think Pair Share".

    • Students will think about a fact they learned and would like to share and they'll put their hand up to share with a classmate.

    • This will go on for about 5-7 minutes until they have at least shared with about 5 fellow classmates. (auditory)

  • We will fill in our foldables by using a recitation method, the teacher will ask a series of questions:

    • Can someone tell me what year Juan Ponce de Leon was born in?

    • What country did he explore for?

    • What were some of the reasons he wanted to go exploring?

    • Was he successful? What did he find?

    • Who has an interesting fact they would like to share?

  • The same set of questions can be used to guide discussion about Jacques Cartier.

  • Make sure to write information on the board to ensure everyone had filled in their foldable correctly.

For Advanced Learners: Place them in groups to play the board game with struggling students so that they can provide an extra layer of support. (visual, auditory)

For Struggling Learners: Place them in groups with advanced learners in order to receive support from them, also check on them during “think pair share” to ensure that everything is going alright for them.

Summary


  • As a class we will go over and review questions for Christopher Columbus:

    • Why did he explore?

    • Did he find what he was looking for?

    • What country did he explore for?

    • Exit cards will be handed out for children to complete.

Materials

  • Explorers board games

  • 2 copies for each explorer (Juan Ponce de Leon, Jaques Cartier and Christoper Columbus)

  • Exit cards

  • Foldable notes for each student (from first day)

Evaluation Part A

  • The students will evaluated by using exit cards

  • Each student will have to put one reason and one accomplishment for Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier


Evaluation Part B

What were the strengths of the lesson?

What were the weaknesses?

How would you change the lesson if you could teach it again?


Name: __________

Exit Card

Give me one reason and one accomplishment from Jon Ponce de Leon’s voyage.

Give me one reason and one accomplishment of Jacques Cartier’s voyage.

Name: __________

Exit Card

Give me one reason and one accomplishment from Jon Ponce de Leon’s voyage.

Give me one reason and one accomplishment of Jacques Cartier’s voyage.

Who Sailed the Ocean Blue Part 3



Purpose

The purpose of this lesson is to educate the students on Christopher Newport and to review Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce De Leon, and Jacques Cartier.

Geography SOL 3.5 The student will develop map skills by

a) positioning and labeling the seven continents and five oceans to create a world map;

b) using the equator and prime meridian to identify the Northern, Southern, Eastern, and

Western Hemispheres;

c) locating the countries of Spain, England, and France;

d) locating the regions in the Americas explored by Christopher Columbus (San Salvador in

the Bahamas), Juan Ponce de León (near St. Augustine, Florida), Jacques Cartier(near

Quebec, Canada), and Christopher Newport (Jamestown, Virginia);

e) locating specific places, using a simple letter-number grid system.


History SOL 3.3 The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques

Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and

the impact of the travels on American Indians.

Objectives


  • The students will be able to identify the purpose and journey of Christopher Newport, Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier when given information through a promethean board game with 95% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to identify Spain, England, and France when given a world map with 100% accuracy.

  • The students will be able to draw the routes of Christopher Columbus, Jacques Cartier, Juan Ponce de Leon, and Christopher Newport when given instruction with 100% accuracy.

Procedure

Introduction



  • Introduce Christopher Newport and review Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de Leon and Jacques Cartier using a Promethean Board game found on Promethean Planet’s Website.

    • Have students come up to drag objects and answer the questions, Christopher Newport will be new, so it should be more as a test to see what they know, and correct their misconceptions.

  • Once the game is over review what was learned about Christopher Newport and help students fill foldables in by writing information on the board as you go.

  • Ask these questions:

    • Who can tell me what country Christopher Newport sailed for?

    • Where did he go?

    • Why did he go there?

    • Did he find what he was looking for?

Development

  • Begin by reviewing the 7 continents and their locations, students will need a copy of a world map to label. Also review all of the oceans and their locations on the map. (visual)

    • Have the students label these features.

  • Instruct students to label France, England, Spain, and North America.

  • Once the continents and Countries are labeled on the map help students draw in the Explorer’s routes to the new world. Project a large map on the white board and fill in the Journeys and Continents as you go.

    • Identify and pinpoint the place they came from

    • Identify and pinpoint the areas in which they landed

Summary

  • Hand out an exit card to each student with the following question:

    • Name one motive and one success for Christopher Newport’s Journey

For advanced and struggling learners: Use the windshield method. Ask students if their windshield is clear, buggy or muddy. For students with buggy or muddy windshields have them pair up with a clear windshield student for help clarifying what they might not understand.

(http://cnweb.cn.edu/tedu/New%20Website%20Docs/DifferentiatedInstructionStrategiesKit.pdf)



Materials

  • Foldable Notes

  • Map of World for each student

  • Projectable map for teacher

  • Markers, Pencils or Crayons

  • Promethian Activity: http://www.prometheanplanet.com/en-us/Resources/Item/81577/explorers-sol-3-3#.UpOCPBZI1js

  • Exit Cards

Evaluation Part A:

The students will be evaluated for Christopher Newport by the exit cards and each map will be looked at for correct labeling and paths.



Evaluation Part B:

What are the strengths of the lesson?

What are the weaknesses of the lesson?

What would you change about the lesson if you could teach it again?

______________________________________________________________________________
Name: ___________

Exit Card

Name one achievement and one accomplishment for Christopher Newport’s voyage.

Name: ___________

Exit Card

Name one achievement and one accomplishment for Christopher Newport’s voyage.


Who Sailed the Ocean Blue Part 4



Purpose

The purpose of this lesson is to review the explorers by focusing interview tactics, and to work on writing skills.  

History 3.3 The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques

Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and

the impact of the travels on American Indians.
Writing 3.9 The student will write for a variety of purposes.  

a) Identify the intended audience.  

b) Use a variety of prewriting strategies.  



c) Write a clear topic sentence focusing on the main idea.  

d) Write a paragraph on the same topic.  

e) Use strategies for organization of information and elaboration according to the

type of writing.  

f) Include details that elaborate the main idea.

g) Revise writing for clarity of content using specific vocabulary and information.



Objectives

  • The students will be able to illustrate an understanding in a literary piece on a given explorer with 100% accuracy in a news article including the reasons for exploration and the accomplishments of the explorer they are assigned.

  • The students will be able to construct a newspaper article with beginning, middle, and end about their assigned explorer.

Procedure

Introduction



  • The lesson will begin with a class discussion about what appropriate interview questions are. Collaboratively, the students and instructor will come up with appropriate interview questions to ask about an explorer. Try to aim for questions such as: (Auditory)

    • When were you born?

    • Where are you from?

    • Why did you venture out on your expedition?

    • Did you encounter any obstacles?

    • What were you in search of?

    • Did you find what you were looking for?

(Write the decided questions on the board for everyone to have reference to) (Visual)

Development



  • Students will be counted off in fours and assigned an explorer. They will then meet with their “expert groups” and discuss what would be an appropriate answer for each question for the interview. (Auditory)

    • There will be information packets for each “expert group” to review and gather the information needed to answer some of the interview questions.

    • The students will then meet with a predetermined partner with whom they will take turns being the interviewer and explorer/ expert the goal is to get information for their news article.

    • Each newspaper article must be a length of 2 paragraphs and it must contain a beginning, middle and end.

  • Once information is gathered, students will be dismissed to work independently on their news articles to depict their understanding of the given explorer. (Kinesthetic, Visual)

Summary

  • When everyone has finished their news articles there will be a class discussion about the explorers and the interview process.

  • Students will be asked to share anything interesting they learned, or their favorite piece of information from the week.

  • Finally, if their are any willing students,  some of them share their news articles with the class.

For struggling learners: Allow time for individual help from teacher.

For advanced learners: Challenge them to write a 3 paragraph article, with an introduction paragraph, body paragraph, and closing paragraph.

Materials:


  • Foldables

  • Explorer Information Packets for each group

  • News article worksheet

  • Markers, crayons, pencils

Evaluation Part A:
The students will be assessed by their news articles and the information within them. Each article must meet the objective.

Evaluation part B:

What are the strengths of this lesson?

What are the weaknesses of this lesson?

What changes can be made if you were to teach it again?

Name__________________

Date___________________



_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________All About Christopher Columbus (1451-1506)



Learn about the explorer's early life, his fateful trip, and his later voyages.
The voyage of Columbus proved to be an unparalleled historic event. It had far-reaching effects, not only on the American continents, but on Europe as well. In addition, historians have recognized Columbus' navigational skills. He found the best route across the ocean to the Americas. He also found the best eastern route back to Europe. His routes are still used hundreds of years later.

Early Life

Christopher Columbus (in Italian, Cristoforo Colombo) was born in 1451 in Genoa, in present-day Italy. His father was a poor weaver, and Christopher worked for him. The boy had little schooling. Few people of his day did. Genoa, however, was a thriving seaport. Christopher learned much from sailors' tales of their voyages. As soon as he could, he went to sea. He made short fishing trips at first. Then he made longer trips with merchants who traded their goods at various ports along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. Between voyages he studied mapmaking and geography. In his early 20's he sailed as a common seaman with a merchant fleet to transport goods to northern Europe. They sailed through the Strait of Gibraltar off the southern coast of Spain and into the Atlantic Ocean.
In 1476, Columbus found himself living in Portugal. Portugal was the greatest European seafaring center of the age. Everything about this center for explorers heated this adventurous young man's desire to find new and unknown lands. During his years in Portugal he mastered the art of navigation. And he absorbed all he could from the writings of such travelers as Marco Polo, who had voyaged to strange lands as far away as Asia. Polo's story of his journey to Cathay (China) in 1275 described a land rich in spices, jewels, and silks.

In Search of a Route to Asia

In Columbus' time there was only one known route to Asia from Europe. Travelers sailed eastward across the Mediterranean Sea. Then they traveled by caravan across ancient routes through deserts and mountains. Europeans were eager to find an easier route for their trading ships. Already Portuguese explorers were sailing south into the Atlantic. They hoped to find a way to Asia by going all the way around Africa. But the seamen were afraid to venture too far out into the unknown waters of the Atlantic. They took care to keep the African coast in their sight.
From his study of geography and from the tales of other sailors, Columbus concluded that India and eastern Asia were on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. That was the route to take.
Columbus was a man of powerful will. He tried for nearly ten years to interest European rulers in his plan. Some agreed that Asia lay to the west. But how far? No one knew. Columbus estimated that Japan must be about 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) due west of the Canary Islands. He miscalculated, however, because he estimated that the earth was smaller than it really is. Japan is more than 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers) away from the islands.

Columbus' First Voyage to the New World

Finally, in 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, the rulers of the Spanish kingdoms of Castile and Aragon, agreed to outfit three ships for Columbus. They promised to make him viceroy (governor) of any new lands he might acquire. And they offered him 10 percent of all the wealth that he would bring to Spain.
With his fleet of three ships — the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa María — Columbus sailed west on August 3, 1492. The ships were manned by a crew of about ninety men. Most were Spanish, except for Columbus and a few others. Columbus kept a careful log of his voyage. Much of what we know about the voyage comes from this source. The ships stopped at the Canary Islands to make repairs and take aboard fresh food. Then the fleet headed out into the open Atlantic — the Sea of Darkness.

As the days passed, tension mounted in the crew. None had ever been out of sight of land for so long. The wind blew steadily from the northeast. They wondered whether they would be able to sail against it to return home. Columbus saw how nervous the men were. He gave them smaller estimates of the number of miles sailed, so they wouldn't know how far they really were from their home port.
Nevertheless, rumbles of mutiny swept through the crew as Columbus pressed on. On the 70th day (many days after Columbus had already expected to reach Japan), a lookout sighted land. It was early on the morning of October 12, 1492. They landed on one of the islands of the Bahamas, which Columbus named San Salvador. The island natives came down to the shore to see Columbus' strange ships. Thinking he had reached the East Indies, Columbus called these people Indians.
Columbus had discovered what Europeans would soon call the New World of the Americas. Of course, it was not a New World to the millions of Native Americans already living there. They had been there thousands of years before the Europeans would "discover" them.
Columbus sailed on to find the rich cities of Asia. He spent the next ten weeks exploring the islands of the Caribbean. He landed on the island of Hispaniola, shared today by the Dominican Republic and Haiti. He also landed on Cuba, which he thought was the Asian mainland. Both islands were heavily populated.
Near Hispaniola, Columbus' flagship, the Santa María, ran aground. The waves smashed it to pieces. Leaving several men behind to establish a fort, Columbus set sail for Spain in the Niña. On the voyage home, he wrote a report of his discoveries. He believed he had reached Asia. Columbus wrote glowingly of its "gentle and peaceful" people, its fertile soil, its spices, and its superb harbors. He also wrote of its "great mines of gold and other metals." This last, however, was his fantasy. He had not found the quantity of riches he had sought.
Holding out the promise of greater riches, Columbus offered to give Ferdinand and Isabella "as much gold as they need…and as many slaves as they ask" if they would finance another voyage. As proof of what he could do, he brought them back a small amount of gold, parrots, and plants. He also brought some Indians he had kidnapped and enslaved.

Later Voyages

Between 1493 and 1504, Columbus made three more trips to the Americas. He was still searching for the great cities of Asia that Marco Polo had described. On his second voyage he found that the men he had left on Hispaniola had all been killed by the Indians. Apparently, as soon as Columbus left, the Spanish had begun to quarrel and fight among themselves. They had made no common effort to build a lasting community. Bands of Spanish thieves roved the countryside, plundering native villages. They forced the Indians to hunt for gold and took women as their prisoners. The Indians, obliged to defend themselves, had killed the intruders.
Columbus never found the gold and jewels he had expected. Apart from his hunt for wealth, his mission was to convert the natives to Christianity. The idea that the Indians might have a right to determine their own way of life and to govern themselves never occurred to him. He also thought he had a right to claim the lands they inhabited for Spain. He saw himself as a redeemer of souls. In this way, he justified all the harmful consequences of his great enterprise.

Columbus Is Recalled to Spain

Failure to deliver what he had promised to Ferdinand and Isabella and reports of chaotic conditions in the colonies led to the downfall of Columbus. In 1500 he was sent back to Spain in chains and was removed as governor of the Indies. In the end, he retained only empty honors. Sick, disappointed, and ignored, he died in Spain in 1506.
Milton Meltzer

Author, Columbus and the World Around Him
Retrieved From: http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/all-about-christopher-columbus-1451-1506

Juan Ponce de Leon

Juan Ponce de León,  (born 1460, Tierra de Campos Palencia, Leon—died 1521, Havana), Spanish explorer who founded the oldest settlement in Puerto Rico and later discovered Florida (1513) while searching for the mythical fountain of youth.

Born into a noble family, Ponce de León was a page in the royal court of Aragon and later fought in a campaign against the Moors in Granada. It is possible that he began his career of exploration in 1493 as part of Christopher Columbus’ second expedition to the New World. In 1502 he was in the West Indies as a captain serving under Nicolás de Ovando, governor of Hispaniola. As a reward for suppressing an Indian mutiny, Ponce de León was named by Ovando to be the provincial governor of the eastern part of Hispaniola. Hearing persistent reports of gold to be found on Puerto Rico, Ponce de León in 1508–09 explored and settled that island, founding the colony’s oldest settlement, Caparra, near what is now San Juan. He then returned to Hispaniola and was named governor of Puerto Rico but was soon displaced from the governorship through the political maneuvering of rivals.

The Spanish crown encouraged Ponce de León to continue searching for new lands. He learned from Indians of an island called Bimini (in the Bahamas) on which there was a miraculous spring or fountain that could rejuvenate those who drank from it (the fountain of youth). In search of this fountain, he led a privately outfitted expedition from Puerto Rico in March 1513 and in April of that year landed on the coast of Florida near the site of modern St. Augustine. At the time he did not realize that he was on the mainland of North America and instead supposed he had landed on an island. He named the region Florida because it was discovered at Easter time (Spanish: Pascua Florida) and because it abounded in lush, florid vegetation. He coasted southward, sailing through the Florida Keys and ending his search near Charlotte Harbor on Florida’s west coast. He then returned to Puerto Rico and thence to Spain, where he secured the title in 1514 of military governor of Bimini and Florida with permission to colonize those regions.

In 1521 Ponce de León sailed again for Florida with two ships and 200 men, landing near Charlotte Harbor. On this occasion he was wounded by an arrow during an Indian attack, and he died after being returned to Cuba. Puerto Rico’s third largest city, Ponce, is named in his honour.

Retrieved From: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/469533/Juan-Ponce-de-Leon

Jaques Cartier



Early Life

Jacques Cartier was born on December 31, 1491 in Saint-Malo, Brittany – which would later become part of France. His career in exploration began in 1524, when he accompanied the Italian-born French explorer Giovanni da Verrazano on his explorations of the Atlantic Coast of Canada and the United States. The experience would prove valuable to Cartier’s explorations in the future.

I Know I found Asia!

In 1534, Cartier was commissioned by the King of France to find the fabled Northwest Passage through the continent of North America to Asia (the Indies). When Cartier reached the New World, he sailed around parts of Newfoundland and parts of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. On July 24, 1534, Cartier planted a cross with the words engraved, “Long Live the King of France” on the shores of Gaspe Bay in Quebec. Cartier claimed the region for France and kidnapped the two sons of an Iroquoian chief. Later in 1534, Cartier returned to France, believing he had found Asia.

The Search for the Northwest Passage

In 1535, Cartier and 112 men (including the two kidnapped natives) left France for their return trip and sailed up the St. Lawrence River to the Iroquoian capital of Stadacona. He reached the location of modern-day Montreal (then called Hochelaga) on October 2, 1535, where rapids prevented him from continuing. Cartier believed the rapids were the last obstacle in his discovery of the Northwest Passage. Today, the town on the banks of the rapids is called Lachine, the French word for China.

Surviving the Winter and Cities of Gold

Cartier and his crew were forced to spend the winter of 1535-1536 at Stadacona, where the snow was four feet deep. In addition, scurvy broke out among members of Cartier’s crew, though most were saved by ingesting a native remedy using the boiled bark of a white spruce tree. In early May of 1536, after enduring a brutal winter, Cartier returned to France with an Iroquoian chief who would tell the tale of the Kingdom of Saguenay, a mythical city said to be full of rubies, gold, and other riches.

Paving the Way for New France

In 1540, Cartier returned to the New World as Captain General of a colonization project. Nevertheless, Cartier set off with five ships down the St. Lawrence River for the purposes of finding the Kingdom of Saguenay and for starting a permanent settlement on the river. The site of the settlement was chosen near present-day Cap-rouge, Quebec and named Charlesbourg- Royal. Despite the forts built at the settlement, and the fact that Cartier’s men falsely believed they had discovered diamonds and gold, conditions deteriorated rapidly. The settlers had begun to starve and attacks by nearby Iroquoian Indians resulted in the deaths of at least 35 of them. Cartier abandoned the settlement in 1542 and the entire settlement disbanded by 1543. Cartier returned to France and died of an epidemic in 1557. Although he was unsuccessful in establishing a permanent settlement, Cartier’s explorations of the St. Lawrence River opened up the interior of Canada to further French exploration and eventual settlement.
Retrieved From: http://mrnussbaum.com/explorers/jacques_cartier/
Christopher Newport

Christopher Newport,  (baptized Dec. 29, 1561, Harwich, Eng.—died August 1617, Bantam, Java, Dutch East Indies [now Indonesia]), British sea captain who was one of the founders of the Jamestown Colony.

Newport went to sea at a young age, and he quickly rose to the rank of a master mariner. After years spent as a privateer attacking Spanish settlements and raiding Spanish ships, he was made a captain in 1590. His first command was the Little John, a privateer vessel belonging to a London merchant, with which he continued to campaign against Spanish settlements in the Caribbean. It was during that period that he lost his right arm in battle. Newport’s other commands included the Golden Dragon and a four-ship flotilla. One of his greatest coups was the taking in 1592 of a treasure-laden Portuguese ship, the Madre de Dios. He became part owner of the Neptune, a privateering vessel, in the mid-1590s.

Newport was elevated to the rank of principal master of the Royal Navy in 1606, the same year that he was chosen by the Virginia Company to lead a colonizing mission to the New World. He set sail from London in December 1606 in command of the Discovery, the Godspeed, and the Susan Constant. That small fleet entered Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay on April 26, 1607. Following their landing at Cape Henry, Newport was made a member of the colony’s seven-person governing body, according to the sealed instructions of the Virginia Company that were opened at landfall. Also at the company’s behest, the colonists settled inland from the coast, on a peninsula in the James River. That settlement, named Jamestown for England’s King James I, was established on May 13, 1607. Between 1606 and 1611, Newport led a total of five voyages between Virginia and England, bringing supplies and additional settlers back to the fledgling colony. On one such trip, in 1609, his ship was blown onto a reef inBermuda, leaving the passengers stranded until they were able to construct new vessels. They returned to Jamestown nearly a year after the shipwreck.

Newport left the employ of the Virginia Company for that of the East Indies Company in 1612. He sailed to Persia (Iran) aboard the Expedition of London in early 1613 and to India in 1615. During his third voyage with the company, as commander of the Hope in 1617, Newport died on the island of Java.

Retrieved From: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1085266/Christopher-Newport
Who Sailed the Ocean Blue Review

Purpose

The purpose of this lesson will be to recap everything we have covered in the last 4 games. Students will be able to answer review questions to ensure their knowledge of the information.


History 3.3 The student will study the exploration of the Americas by

a) describing the accomplishments of Christopher Columbus, Juan Ponce de León, Jacques

Cartier, and Christopher Newport;

b) identifying the reasons for exploring, the information gained, the results of the travels, and

the impact of the travels on American Indians.
Physical Education 3.1 The student will apply locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills in increasingly complex movement activities.

a) Demonstrate most of the critical elements (small, isolated parts of the whole skill or movement)



for manipulative skills (e.g., throw and catch a variety of objects, kick to stationary and moving partners/objects, dribble with dominant hand/foot, pass a ball to a moving partner).

b) Use manipulative skills in movement combinations (e.g., perform manipulative tasks while



dodging and moving in different pathways; catch a rolled ball while moving, and throw it back to a partner).

c) Demonstrate moving to a rhythm (e.g., perform simple dances in various formations, develop and refine a creative educational dance sequence).



Objectives

  • The students will be able to answer questions 98% correctly when given a set of choices and  asked aloud by teacher during a reveiw game.

Procedure

Introduction



  • Today we are going to review everything we have learned in the past week during a fun game!

  • On the floor are a bunch of hula hoops set up with a either a country and at each corner are hula hoops with the name of each explorer.

    • Students will stand at a central location and when a question is called they will have to maneuver to the hula hoop matching the answer using the locomotor skill called out by the teacher after the question (hopping, skipping, jumping, jogging, one foot hopping, etc.)

Development

  • Have the students move to a central location in the classroom away from the hula hoops.

  • Begin asking review questions after instructions are given. (Auditory, Kinisthetic)

    • What explorer sailed for Spain? There could be more than one answer.

    • What explorer sailed for France?

    • What explorer landed in St. Augustine?

    • Columbus landed in what place?

    • Christopher Newport landed where?

    • What explorer was in search of a Western Sea Route to Asia? There could be more than one answer.

    • What explorer was in search of riches? There could be more than one answer.

    • What explorer wanted to colonize Virginia?

    • What explorer wanted to colonized the New World?

    • Who was the first European to discover a sea route to America and the Western Hemisphere?

    • What explorer landed in Canada?

    • What explorer arrived at present day Jamestown?

    • Who was the first explorer to reach the fall line on the James River?

Summary

  • Once all of the questions have been answered have the students sit in a circle.

  • Discuss what everyone's favorite thing about the week has been.

  • Hand out the explorers project grid and explain it.

    • Instead of giving a test students will be choosing a project from the grid to complete

    • It must show the successes and reasons of exploration for the explorer the student picks

    • They will have 1 week at home to complete it and turn their project in.

For advanced and struggling learners:: At the end of the game before sitting in a circle ask students if their "windshield" is buggy, muddy, or clear. Have students with clear windshields work with those that have buggy or muddy windshields to clarify what they may not understand. (http://cnweb.cn.edu/tedu/New%20Website%20Docs/DifferentiatedInstructionStrategiesKit.pdf)

Materials

  • Hula hoops

  • Paper labels (with names of explorers and countries written) to go inside of each hula hoop

  • Explorers project grid to hand out

Evaluation Part A

Students will be loosely evaluated by the number of questions they answer correctly. Teacher will visually evaluate and make notes while the game is going on.


Evaluation part B:

What are the strengths of this lesson?

What are the weaknesses of this lesson?

What changes can be made if you were to teach it again?


Inspiration for this lesson came from Erin Trimble and Mary’s HPEX Lesson from Spring 2013.

Explorers Project Grid

Choose a project from the grid. Make sure you include all of the reasons and accomplishments of your explorer in your choice!


Explorer Advertisement
Create an advertisement about the journey of your favorite explorer. Write a small paragraph to explain it.

Explorer Puppet
Create your favorite explorer in puppet form! Write a small script and have your puppet speak to our class.

Exploration Comic
Create a 6 frame comic story about your favorite explorer and their journey! (make it funny!)

Exploration Song


Write a poem, rap or song about exploration and share it with our class!

Exploration Story
Write a short story  about your favorite explorer and draw a picture to go with it!

Explorer Diorama
Create a shoebox diorama about your favorite explorer!

Explorer Project Rubric/Scoring Sheet


Neatness: The project exhibits grand neatness and is not sloppy. You can tell the student spent a good amount of time on it.
____/5 pts.
Content: The project contains at least one success and one accomplishment of the Explorer chosen. The student shows understanding of the topic.
____/ 40 pts.
Behavior: The student exhibited utmost behavior during presentations of everyone’s projects in class.
____/5 pts.

Resources:




  • Chocolate golden coins

  • Foldable notes sheet for each student

  • The book 1492 by Jean Marzollo

  • The youtube video “Discoverin’ America” : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWY50mH5awQ

  • Exit cards

  • Encyclopedias (Kid Friendly)

  • Books about Columbus

  • Explorers board games

  • 2 copies for each explorer (Juan Ponce de Leon, Jaques Cartier and Christoper Columbus)

  • Map of World for each student

  • Projectable map for teacher

  • Markers, Pencils or Crayons

  • Promethian Activity: http://www.prometheanplanet.com/en-us/Resources/Item/81577/explorers-sol-3-3#.UpOCPBZI1js

  • Foldables

  • Explorer Information Packets for each group

    • Retrieved From: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1085266/Christopher-Newport

    • http://mrnussbaum.com/explorers/jacques_cartier/

    • http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/469533/Juan-Ponce-de-Leon

    • http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/all-about-christopher-columbus-1451-1506

  • News article worksheet

  • Hula hoops

  • Paper labels (with names of explorers and countries written) to go inside of each hula hoop

  • Explorers project grid to hand out

Download 139.33 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2022
send message

    Main page