304th Military Police Battalion Unit History



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304th Military Police Battalion

Unit History
The 304th Military Police Battalion traces its lineage back to the 742d Military Police Battalion, which was constituted 10 January 1942 in the Army of the United States. The 742d Military Police Battalion was activated 1 March 1942 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas for service in World War II, and inactivated 10 April 1946 at Manila, Luzon, Philippine Islands. The 742d Military Police Battalion was redesignated as the 304th Military Police Battalion, allotted to the Organized Reserve Corps and assigned to Third Army on 2 November 1948. The 304th Military Police Battalion was activated 29 November 1948 with Headquarters at Memphis, Tennessee. The battalion’s Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment was redesignated 1 March 1951 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company. The Organized Reserve Corps, to which the battalion was assigned, was redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve. The battalion’s Headquarters and Headquarters Company was inactivated 15 May 1959 at Memphis and not reactivated until 1991.
Although not part of the battalion’s official lineage, the 304th Military Police Battalion has strong historical ties to the 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was constituted on 1 May 1959 in the Army Reserve and assigned to the Third United States Army. The 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was activated 1 June 1959 at Nashville, Tennessee. In 1973, the 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was relieved from assignment to the Third United States Army and assigned to the First United States Army. The camp was activated on 6 December 1990 for service in support of Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm/and Provide Comfort, conducting enemy prisoner of war detainment operation in Saudi Arabia. The 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was relieved from active duty on 2 June 1991. The 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was commended by the Chief of Staff, United States Army and the Secretary of the Army for exceptionally meritorious service in support of Operation Desert Storm.
Following Operation Desert Storm, the Army reconfigured its enemy prisoner of war operations, disbanding prisoner of war camps and replacing them with enemy prisoner of war battalions (later reclassified as internment/resettlement battalions). In this vein, the 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp was disbanded and replaced at Nashville on 16 December 1991 by the reconstituted 304th Military Police Battalion (Enemy Prisoner of War); (was later changed to (Internment/Resettlement). The 304th Military Police Battalion inherited the mission of the 401st Military Police Prisoner of War Camp, occupied the camp’s old headquarters, and received many of the camp’s former soldiers into its ranks. Several of these soldiers would later deploy with the 304th Military Police battalion in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 304th Military Police Battalion (Internment/Resettlement) mobilized 10 February 2003, Nashville, Tennessee, for service in Operation Enduring Freedom. The battalion reported to its mobilization station at Camp Atterbury, Indiana on 17 February 2003 and deployed to Kuwait on 13 April 2003. The battalion was initially under the command and control of the 800th Military Police Brigade, providing support to the theater internment facility in Camp Bucca, Iraq.  On 26 April 2003, the battalion was task organized under the 220th Military Police Brigade and given customs, force protection, personal security detail, convoy escort, and other military police missions. The 304th Military Police Battalion conducted customs and other military police missions, as well as other support functions, in Kuwait, Iraq, Qatar, Jordan, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia during Operation Iraqi Freedom 1. On 1 November 2003, the battalion was task organized under the 377th Theater Support Command and continued with customs as its primary mission.  The 304th Military Police Battalion redeployed to Camp Atterbury, Indiana on 5 April 2004 for demobilization and was released from active duty, returning to Nashville, TN on 10 April 2004.

Campaign Streamers: World War II



New Guinea
Decorations: None
Unit Motto: Comis sed Fortiter; Courteous yet Resolute


Distinctive Insignia:



Coat of Arms: Vert, on a dodecafoil or a frontiersman statant affronte in sombrero, short breeches and leather boots, armed with rifle and cartridge belt, all proper. Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: on a wreath of the colors (or and vert) the Lexington Minute Man proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H. H. Kitson, sculptor) stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts. Yellow and green are the colors of the Military Police. The dodecafoil represents the sunflower, the state flower of Kansas where the battalion was originally activated. The frontiersman or scout with the appearance of alertness and readiness symbolizes the functions of the battalion. The motto is expressive of the characteristics of the personnel in the performance of their duties.

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