10th mountain division (light infantry) and fort drum



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Appendix D


Past Division Commanders and Command Sergeants Major

10th MOUNTAIN DIVISION COMMANDERS


Major General Lloyd E. Jones Jul 1943 Nov 1944

Major General George P. Hays Nov 1944 Nov 1945

Major General Lester J. Whitlock Aug 1948 Oct 1950

Major General James E. Moore Nov 1950 May 1951

Brigadier General Marcus B. Bell May 1951 Nov 1953

Major General George D. Shea Nov 1951 Jan 1953

Major General Thomas L. Harrold Feb 1953 Jun 1954

Major General Philip D. Ginder Jun 1954 Mar 1955

Major General George E. Martin Apr 1955 Mar 1956

Major General Barksdale Hamlet Apr 1956 Jun 1957

Major General Walter B. Yeager Jul 1957 Apr 1958

Brigadier General Miller O. Perry May 1958 Jun 1958

Major General William S. Carpenter Feb 1985 Apr 1988

Major General Peter J. Boylan Apr 1988 Sep 1990

Major General James R. Ellis Sep 1990 Sep 1991

Major General Stephen L. Arnold Sep 1991 Aug 1993

Major General David C. Meade Aug 1993 Jul 1995

Major General Thomas N. Burnette Jul 1995 Jun 1997

Major General Lawson W. Magruder Jun 1997 Mar 1998

Major General James L. Campbell Mar 1998 Aug 2001

Major General F. L. (Buster) Hagenbeck Aug 2001 Aug 2003

Major General Lloyd J. Austin III Aug 2003 Aug 2005

Major General Benjamin C. Freakley Aug 2005 Apr 2007

Major General Michael L. Oates Apr 2007 Sep 2009


Major General James L. Terry Sep 2009 Nov 2011


Major General Mark A. Milley Nov 2011 Dec 2012 Major General Stephen J. Townsend Dec 2012 Present

10th MOUNTAIN DIVISION COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR


CSM Southern W. Hewitt Jan 1985 Jul 1990

CSM Robert C. Sexton Jul 1990 May 1994

CSM Jesse G. Laye Jun 1994 Jul 1995

CSM Frank J. Mantia Jul 1995 Feb 1998

CSM Teddy Harman Feb 1998 Jul 2000

CSM Kenneth C. Lopez Oct 2000 Aug 2002

CSM Dennis M. Carey Aug 2002 Jun 2004

CSM Ralph C. Borja Jul 2004 May 2007

CSM James W. Redmore Jul 2007 Mar 2010

CSM Christopher K. Greca Mar 2010 Nov 2011

CSM Richard Merritt Jan 2012 Jan 2014

CSM R. Ray Lewis Jan 2014 Present
Appendix E

Army Values and Soldiers Creed

Army Values

Loyalty: Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, your unit, and other Soldiers.

Duty: Fulfill your obligations.

Respect: Treat people as they should be treated.

Selfless-Service: Put the welfare of the nation, the Army, and your subordinates before your own.

Honor: Live up to all the Army values.

Integrity: Do what's right, legally and morally.

Personal Courage: Face fear, danger, or adversity (Physical or Moral).
The Soldiers Creed

I am an American Soldier.
I am a Warrior and a member of a team. I serve the people of the United States and live the Army Values.
I will always place the mission first.
I will never accept defeat.

Warrior Ethos

I will never quit.
I will never leave a fallen comrade.
I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained, and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills. I always maintain my arms, my equipment, and myself.
I am an expert and I am a professional.
I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy the enemies of the United States of America in close combat.
I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.
I am an American Soldier.

Appendix F

Division and Army Songs
10th MOUNTAIN DIVISION SONG

“CLIMB TO GLORY”




We’re the 10th Mountain Infantry
With a glorious history
On our own two feet, all our foes we’ll defeat
Light Fighters marching on to victory
We go where others dare not go
In the heat or cold of snow
We are proud to be in the Army of the Free
Climb to Glory, Mountain Infantry
Climb to Glory, the Light Infantry

ARMY SONG

(Sung to the tune of the original Field Artillery Song)
March along; sing our song, with the Army of the free.

Count the brave; count the true, who have fought to victory.

We’re the Army and proud of our name!

We’re the Army and proudly proclaim:


First to fight for the right,

And to build the nation’s might,

And THE ARMY GOES ROLLING ALONG.

Proud of all we have done,

Fighting ‘till the battle’s won,

And THE ARMY GOES ROLLING ALONG.


Then it’s Hi ! Hi ! Hey!

The Army’s on its way.

Count off the cadence loud and strong!

For where’er we go,



You will always know that

THE ARMY GOES ROLLING ALONG.

Appendix G Leader Cold Weather G

c:\users\edward.a.sedlock\pictures\coldwx.jpg


Extended Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS)
Appendix G Leader Cold Weather Guide



Clothing Item

Layer

Level of Protection

Conditions When Worn

Light-weight Cold Weather Undershirt/Drawers (Silk)

Base

Added insulation

Actively cold environments


Mid-weight Cold Weather Shirt/Drawers (Waffle)

Base or Insulation

Provides light insulation

For use in mild climates

Fleece Jacket

Insulation or Outer

Insulates body in cold environments

Used during mild to cool days

Wind Cold Weather Jacket

Outer Shell Layer

Wind resistant, water repellant, with moisture wicking layer

Used on windy cool days


Soft Shell Jacket/Trousers

Outer

Highly water and wind resistant, with greater moisture vapor transfer

Worn in cold snow and rain environments


Extreme Cold/Wet Weather Jacket/Trousers (GORTEX)

Outer

Waterproof for use in prolonged hard rain and cold/wet conditions, mud and slush on ground

Best when environment is alternating between freezing and thawing conditions

Extreme Cold Weather Parka/Trousers (Down)

Outer

Superior warmth protection, highly water and wind resistant

For extreme cold weather climates



10th carved copy


LEADER'S GUIDE

For prevention of cold weather injuries due to exposure to temperatures below 40 F




Information on this card is provided to assist leaders in risk decision-making and control development as part of the risk management process. Risk decisions and controls should be developed for all training. Leaders must ensure that these risk decisions/controls are implemented into unit training plans and that training is supervised.

Command Safety

RECOMMENDATIONS

Minimum Uniform

WIND CHILL CATEGORY

(SEE REVERSE)

FIELD

UNIFORM

WORN


FIELD

UNIFORM CARRIED

PT UNIFORM

OFF-DUTY

ACTIVITIES



OTHER FACTORS
LITTLE

DANGER

- LW or MW POLY PRO (T&B)

- ECWCS** (T&B)

- GORE-TEX BOOTS*

- FLEECE CAP

- GORTEX GLOVES


- BALACLAVA

- TRIGGER FINGER MITTENS




-IPFU

SWEATS


-FLEECE CAP

-GLOVES


W/INSERTS

-NECK GAITER



-COAT

-HAT


-EAR PROTECTION

-GLOVES


-BOOTS

-INCREASE LEADER SURVEILLANCE

-NO FACIAL CAMOUFLAGE BELOW 32 F

-INCREASE HYDRATION

-PROVIDE WARM-UP AREAS WITH HOT DRINKS, ETC

-SKIN COVERED AND DRY


INCREASING DANGER

- MW POLY PRO (T&B)

- ECWCS** (T&B) (GORTEX)

- BALACLAVA

- ECW MITTENS

- BOOTS ECW (TYPE I)





-IPFU

SWEATS


-POLY PRO (T&B)

-BALACLAVA

-TRIGGER FINGER

MITTENS


-COAT

-HAT


-EAR PROTECTION

-GLOVES


-BOOTS

-RESTRICT NON-ESSENTIAL OUTDOOR TRAINING.

-LOW ACTIVITY: 30-40 MIN WORK CYCLE

-SEDENTARY ACTIVITY: 15-20 MIN WORK CYCLE

-USE BUDDY SYSTEM

-NO EXPOSED SKIN


GREAT

DANGER

- LW and MW -POLY PRO (T&B)

-ECWCS** (T&B) (Down)

-BALACLAVA

-ECW MITTENS

-BOOTS ECW (TYPEII)





-IPFU

-ECW PARKA

-POLY PRO (T&B)

-BALACLAVA

-TRIGGER FINGER

MITTENS


-HEAVY COAT

-LONG UNDERWEAR

-HAT & SCARF

-MITTENS


-CW BOOTS

-CONSIDER INDOOR TNG

-HIGH INTENSITY ACTIVITY: <15 MIN WORK CYCLE

-CONSIDER CANCELING LOW OR SEDENTAR ACTIVITY OUTDOOR TNG

-COVER ALL EXPOSED SKIN



  • GORE-TEX BOOTS = Tan leather intermediate weather or similar GORE-TEX insulated leather boots

  • ** ECWCS = Extended Cold Weather Clothing System

Appendix H

Official Fort Drum PT/Running Map

north post.png



Appendix H

Official Fort Drum PT/Running Map

south post.png

Appendix H

Official Fort Drum PT/Running Map

wsaaf.png

Appendix I

The Wickham Charter

THE WICKHAM CHARTER
In October 1983, the Army Chief of Staff, General John Wickham, announced his decision to create light infantry divisions. In the ten years since the American withdrawal from Vietnam, the general trend of US Army force structure development had been toward heavy mechanized and armor forces, and so Wickham's decision represented a major change of direction for the Army. To overcome resistance to the new units, Wickham and other Army leaders worked to generate a broad-based advocacy for light divisions.

Despite these efforts, and also despite the sound strategic rationale for this new initiative, the creation of light infantry divisions touched off a storm of protest. In a publication called White Paper 1984: Light Infantry Divisions, General Wickham explained the strategic need for the new light forces. A key feature of these units was their strategic mobility; because of their streamlined size and composition, they could be transported aboard Air Force aircraft to potential trouble spots. This deployability was to be attained by removing much heavy equipment, firepower, and support infrastructure from the light division while leaving it with a relatively large "slice" (50%) of combat troops.

Wickham calculated that light infantry divisions would fill a void in American military capability. Light divisions could be moved more quickly and more easily than could heavier forces. Moreover, light infantry units would be better suited for many crisis situations, such as counterinsurgency or other low intensity-type operations, than were ponderous tank or mechanized forces. General Wickham announced the creation of five light infantry divisions. Two of these -- the 7th and the 25th Divisions – would come from the reorganization of existing active divisions. Two others (6th and 10th Mountain) would be new divisions.

Wickham decided that the new 10th Mountain Division should be activated at Fort Drum, New York. Fort Drum was then a rundown, backwater post in the economically depressed area near upstate Watertown. The prospect of tens of millions of dollars being pumped into the local economy earned the light division program strong congressional backing from the powerful New York delegation. Also coincidentally -- perhaps -- the 10th Mountain Division happened to have been the outfit of Senator Robert Dole during World War II. The Senate Minority Leader, a decorated officer who was seriously wounded in Italy, was appropriately feted at the division's activation ceremony and became a supporter.



Appendix J
Chain Of Command NCO Support Channel
_______________________________________ ______________________________

COMMANDER IN CHIEF SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE ARMY


_______________________________________ ________________________________

SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FORSCOM/ THEATER CSM


_______________________________________ ________________________________

CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF CORPS CSM

_______________________________________ ________________________________

SECRETARY OF THE ARMY DIVISION CSM


_______________________________________ ________________________________

ARMY CHIEF OF STAFF REGIMENT/ BRIGADE CSM


_______________________________________ ________________________________

FORSCOM/ THEATER CDR BATTALION/SQUADRON CSM


_______________________________________ ________________________________

CORPS COMMANDER 1SG/DETACHMENT SERGEANT


_______________________________________ ________________________________

DIVISION COMMANDER PLATOON SERGEANT


_______________________________________ ________________________________

BRIGADE COMMANDER SECTION/SQUAD LEADER


_______________________________________ ________________________________

BATTALION COMMANDER TEAM LEADER


_______________________________________

COMPANY/BATTERY/TROOP COMMANDER


_______________________________________

PLATOON LEADER


_______________________________________

SECTION/SQUAD LEADER




Appendix K

Key Contacts
Fort Drum Contacts (Area code 315)


Boss

772-7807

CG Hotline

772-6666

Chaplain

772-5591

CIF

772-4348

Dental

772-8891

Education Center

772-6878

EFMP

772-4653/4620

Finance

772-5529

Fire and nonemergency

772-4420/3180

ID Cards

772-5149

IG

772-5491

JAG

772-3067

Legal

772-5261

Magrath Gym

772-9272

Monti Gym

772-4936

MP

772-5156

MWR

772-8222

Provost Marshall

772-9090

Clark Hall

772-6561

Safety Office

772-5352

Tricare

772-5111

WIC

315-782-9222

Wounded Warrior

772-5485

ACH Housing

772-6883

Post Locator (1:00pm-3:45pm M-F)

772-5869

Post Operator

772-6011


Appendix K

Key Contacts
Fort Polk Contacts (Area code 337)


Boss

531-1948

Chaplain

531-6433

CIF

531-7510

Dental

531-4854

Education Center

531-1537

EFMP

531-2840

Finance

531-8648

Fire and nonemergency

531-2911

ID Cards

531-1839

IG

531-2100

JAG

531-2019

Legal

531-2580

Wheelock Fitness Center

531-6795

MP

531-0705

MWR

531-4440

Provost Marshall

531-0705

Safety Office

531-4329

Tricare

531-3118

WIC

239-1203

Wounded Warrior

531-1637

ACH Housing

537-5060

Post Operator

531-2911






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