10 com ith/15/10. Com/4 Paris, 27 October 2015 Original: English



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Chairperson proceeded with the adoption of the draft decision on a paragraph-by-paragraph basis. With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson declared adopted Decision 9.COM 10.6 to inscribe Pujllay and Ayarichi, music and dances of the Yampara culture on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

520.The delegation of Bolivia, represented by the Minister of Culture, spoke on behalf of the country and the Yampara community in its appreciation of the inscription of the element on the Representative List. This recognized the significant cultural contribution of Yampara communities in the celebration of an ancient culture that is related to fertility rites in relation to Pachamama.

521.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body turned to the next nomination on Zmijanje embroidery [draft decision 9.COM 10.7] submitted by Bosnia and Herzegovina. Zmijanje embroidery is a specific technique practised by the women of Zmijanje villages in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Traditionally, Zmijanje embroidery is used to decorate female costumes and household items, including wedding dresses, scarves, garments and bed linen. A deep blue thread is used to embroider improvised geometrical shapes; the richness and variations of the embroidered designs determine the social status of the village women. Embroidery is usually performed among groups of women, who engage in needlework while singing and chatting. In its evaluation, the Subsidiary Body found that all the criteria were satisfied. By combining religious rituals, oral traditions, know-how linked to traditional crafts and a symbolic universe, the embroidery was shown to be an important element of identity and a living heritage transmitted to younger generations. Similarly, the nomination satisfactorily demonstrated that inscription would enhance the understanding and appreciation of intangible cultural heritage at the national level, but would also stimulate dialogue among embroiderers internationally. In addition, the Body unanimously appreciated the proposed safeguarding measures, which were well designed and realistic, adequately responding to the needs. There was also broad participation of different actors, whose roles were clearly described, and the widest possible participation of the community in the elaboration of the file and the inclusion of the element in an inventory were clearly demonstrated. The Body therefore recommended that Zmijanje embroidery be inscribed on the Representative List, recalling paragraph 4 of the draft decision that expressions such as ‘authentic’ and ‘original’ did not comply with either the spirit or the letter of the Convention.

522.The Chairperson thanked the Vice-Chair of the Subsidiary Body for the explanation, noting that the Committee was ready to adopt the draft decision on a paragraph-by-paragraph basis.

523.The delegation of Belgium wished to emphasize, as was stated in the file, that ‘embroidery’ referred to an abstract concept that comprised the technique practised by the women and not the object itself.

524.The Chairperson concurred with the remark by Belgium, and proceeded with the adoption of the draft decision on a paragraph-by-paragraph basis, which were duly adopted. With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson declared adopted Decision 9.COM 10.7 to inscribe Zmijanje embroidery on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

525.The delegation of Côte d’Ivoire remarked on the last paragraph in which it was mentioned that it was inappropriate to mention terms such as ‘unique’, ‘original’ and ‘exceptional. As this was second time, it was apparent that a general recommendation should be made, as one might not necessarily refer to specific decisions of a particular State or inscription, which would be clearer for all.

526.The Chairperson thanked Côte d’Ivoire for the pertinent intervention. The Chairperson then turned to the next draft decision 9.COM 10.8.

527.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body turned to the next nomination on Capoeira circle [draft decision 9.COM 10.8] submitted by Brazil. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian cultural practice that can be interpreted as a tradition, a sport and even an art form that promotes mutual respect and social cohesion. Capoeira players form a circle at the centre of which two players engage with one another. The movements require great bodily dexterity. The other players around the circle sing, chant, clap and play percussive instruments. Capoeira circles comprise a master, counter-master and disciples. The master is the bearer and guardian of the knowledge of the circle, and teaches the group through observation and imitation. The Subsidiary Body found that the file satisfactorily demonstrated that the element constituted the intangible cultural heritage of Brazilians and that it also embodied the memory of the African diaspora in Brazil as well as being a symbol of Brazil around the world. The Subsidiary Body thus concluded favourably on all the criteria. The nomination demonstrated how the inclusion of this element would contribute to ensuring visibility of similar expressions related to resistance against oppression and discrimination, especially among communities of African descent, and that it fostered dialogue. The proposed safeguarding measures were comprehensive and detailed. The participation of communities as well as the submitting State, particularly through the National Institute of Historic and Artistic Heritage (IPHAN), had been clearly demonstrated. The Body were convinced of the widest possible participation of the community in the elaboration of the nomination and its free, prior and informed consent, as well as its inscription in an inventory. The Subsidiary Body thus concluded by recommending the inscription of Capoeira circle on the Representative List.

528.With no forthcoming comments or amendments, the Chairperson proceeded with the adoption of the draft decision on a paragraph-by-paragraph basis, which was duly adopted. With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson declared adopted Decision 9.COM 10.8 to inscribe Capoeira circle on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

529.The delegation of Brazil thanked the Committee, the Subsidiary Body, the Secretariat, and colleagues from the Brazilian delegation, the chief of intangible heritage of IPHAN, and the practitioners of capoeira, masters who were represented from Brazil and groups composed of French, Portuguese and Brazilian practitioners in Paris. The delegation wished to thank all those who promote and safeguard intangible cultural heritage all over the world, and mostly for the inscription of capoeira by the Committee. The delegation described capoeira as a game, a fight and a dance. It is a ritual performed around a circle, which is a metaphor for the cycle of life, and has its own hierarchy and mechanisms of transmission. Capoeira also gave rise to its own musical form accompanied by specially developed instruments and rhythms that facilitate the improvisation of capoeira gestures. Created by African slaves brought to Brazil more than 300 years ago during a long period of slavery, it served as a survival tool in the face of continued violence. For at least three centuries, capoeira was forbidden by white society but even so it managed to survive all kinds of oppression, imprisonment and prejudice and was played inside the plantations, the mining areas, in the poorest urban suburbs. Capoeira is recognized as national heritage since 2008, and for this reason Brazilian intangible cultural heritage policies coordinated by IPHAN had stimulated the creation of local and regional committees all over the country, as well as many other safeguarding measures. The delegation expressed the country’s emotion for the international recognition and visibility of capoeira; the opposite of the situation faced so many years ago. Reflecting on its history since the first slaves invented the capoeira, the delegation was grateful to the bearers and masters who for such a long time had transmitted their knowledge. It believed that capoeira reinforced the principles of the Convention, and at the same time it emphasized its role as an instrument of social cohesion in fighting discrimination.

[Performance of capoeira]

530.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body turned to the next nomination on Chiprovski kilimi (Chiprovtsi carpets) [draft decision 9.COM 10.9] submitted by Bulgaria. Kilimi are hand-woven carpets made by the women of Chiprovtsi. The weavers take several threads of the warp, interlace the weft yarn into the warp to make tapestries traditionally utilized as floor coverings. The process of transmission occurs informally from mothers and grandmothers to daughters, often while working together on large carpets. The men of the town typically engage in wool production, processing and dyeing. The finished carpets are renowned for their composition, ornamental motifs and colour. In its evaluation, the Subsidiary Body found that all the criteria were satisfied. It was convinced that the nomination demonstrated the knowledge and skills associated with this practice, ranging from breeding sheep, wool processing and the weaving itself, and were recognized by the Chiprovtsi villagers as part of their cultural heritage, transmitted from generation to generation. The Body also concluded without difficulty that the inscription of the element would improve the visibility of traditional craftsmanship and its diverse skills to promote dialogue between communities with similar traditions. The proposed safeguarding measures appeared adequate, benefiting from proven support by the submitting State. The Body concluded that the nomination process had the full participation of the practitioners and inhabitants of Chiprovtsi, local authorities, and relevant NGOs. The Subsidiary Body concluded by recommending the inscription of Chiprovski kilimi (Chiprovtsi carpets) on the Representative List.

531.The Chairperson informed the Committee that Bulgaria wished to change the title of the element in order to respond to remarks, especially from Belgium, on the importance of highlighting the process and not the product in the title.

532.The Secretary read the proposed title, ‘The tradition of carpet-making in Chiprovtsi’.

533.The delegation of Côte d’Ivoire agreed with the decision of the Subsidiary Body and supported the proposal. Indeed, it was not the carpet that should be inscribed but the tradition of carpet manufacture.

534.The delegation of Belgium asked that the proposal be transcribed in paragraph 3.

535.With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson declared adopted Decision 9.COM 10.9 to inscribe the tradition of carpet-making in Chiprovtsi on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

536.The delegation of Bulgaria explained that it had introduced the amendment at the last moment in order to adhere to the principle of consistency. It expressed its utmost satisfaction with the positive evaluation by the Subsidiary Body and the Committee to inscribe. The inscription held enormous value for the country where the tradition of carpet making had for a long time not only become an overarching symbol of cultural identity but also a powerful example of the continuing efforts to ensure the vitality of cultural tradition. The inscription of the element bore special importance for the local community where the preparation of carpets was the most representative local occupation, engaging men and women, children and the elderly, and where the traditional transmission of carpet weaving skills was well preserved. Intertwined with a range of beliefs, verbal, formal and ritual practices, carpet weaving was deeply integrated in the social and cultural life of the population of Chiprovski, enabling social contact and shedding light on the fundamental importance of natural resources in human creativity.

537.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body presented the next nomination on Ritual dance of the royal drum [draft decision 9.COM 10.10] submitted by Burundi. The ritual dance of the royal drum is a spectacle combining powerful, synchronized drumming with dancing, heroic poetry and traditional songs. The dance calls for at least a dozen or so drums, always in an odd number, arranged in a semicircle around a central drum. Two or three drummers then perform dances to the rhythm. The ritual dance is an opportunity to transmit cultural, political and social messages, and a privileged means of bringing people of diverse generations and origins together, thereby encouraging unity and social cohesion. In its evaluation, the Subsidiary Body found that all the criteria were satisfied, and – following the practice of its predecessors – wished to cite the nomination as a ‘good example’ that could inspire other States in this exercise. Indeed, the submitting State had convincingly demonstrated that the element, having undergone various transformations of meaning and practice, today constituted an expression of identity recognized by the people of Burundi, including its diaspora. The explanation in R.2 clearly showed how the element’s inscription promoted inter-generational dialogue and human creativity. The Body found that the nomination presented a rich and detailed safeguarding plan, including measures designed not only to ensure learning, transmission and dissemination of the practice, but also tackled such issues as the protection of the raw materials used to make the drums. The participation of drummers had been adequately demonstrated in the elaboration of the safeguarding plan and the nomination file, as well as the inventory. The Subsidiary Body was thus pleased to conclude its recommendation of the inscription of Ritual dance of the royal drum on the Representative List.

538.The Chairperson thanked the Vice-Chair of Subsidiary Body for the summary, and was pleased to note that the nomination was among those considered to constitute a ‘good example’.

539.The delegation of Brazil congratulated Burundi on its nomination, its first element inscribed on the Representative List. It wished the people of Burundi all the best, congratulating them for the great tradition of the ritual dance of the royal drum.

540.The delegation of Côte d’Ivoire congratulated Burundi for the inscription of the element on the Representative List, agreeing with the Committee in its encouraging remark on the high quality of the nomination.

541.The delegation of Uganda joined the other States in congratulating Burundi for the quality of its nomination file, remarking that her director had suggested that Uganda consider nominating the royal drums of Uganda, and it would thus use this file as an example for its nominations in the future.

542.The delegation of Turkey joined the previous speakers in commending the nomination, constituting the first ever inscription for Burundi, and it welcomed and encouraged such initiatives, which was fully in the spirit of the Convention.

543.With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson declared adopted Decision 9.COM 10.10 to inscribe Ritual dance of the royal drum on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

544.The Minister of Sports and Culture of Burundi spoke of the country’s honour and privilege to have been honoured by the Committee, remarking that UNESCO had strengthened the ties that united it with Burundi. He congratulated the Subsidiary Body for its productive and objective work in its evaluation of nominations. The Minister spoke of the country’s pride that the element had been inscribed on the Representative List. It was a proud moment for Burundi and a great day for all the peoples of Africa and the world, adding that entire population of Burundi recognized ‘The ritual dance of the royal drum’ as part of its cultural heritage and national identity. This dance was practised today throughout the country in primary schools, colleges and universities, and showcased in other cultural events in the country. It was also practised abroad by the Burundian diaspora. The representatives of the drummers, supported by the government, wished to have their art recognized for its values and originality on the Representative List. Now that this had been achieved, the dance would be popular abroad through cultural festivals. Furthermore, Burundi had already presented this ceremonial dance at regional, continental and world events. This dance thus represented Burundi’s immense cultural wealth, which would enhance the quality of intangible cultural heritage as a whole. The Minister spoke of several measures that were envisaged for the transmission, protection, promotion, and research of this dance. It would strengthen and promote the dance in schools, universities and youth clubs dance. The government was already protecting the plant species that was necessary in the manufacture of the drum, as well as the historical sites and shrines connected with this dance. Inscription would encourage cultural partners to promote the sending of drummers outside the country to raise awareness and foster cultural exchange, and an international festival of percussion was also planned. Thus, several activities were planned, which required support, including from UNESCO. The Minister was grateful for the support in the promotion of the dance nationally and internationally, inviting the delegates to join the performance of Ritual dance of the royal drum later in the evening.



[Performance of ritual dance of the royal drum]

545.The Chairperson thanked the Minister of Sports and Culture of Burundi for honouring the Committee with his presence.

546.The Secretary reminded the Committee of the meeting of the NGO working groups, as well as an information session on the capacity-building programme for Electoral Group III.

547.The Chairperson adjourned the session.



[Wednesday 26 November, afternoon session]

548.The Chairperson resumed the session, inviting the Vice-Chair to continue with the presentation of nomination files to the Representative List.

549.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body presented the next nomination on Baile Chino [draft decision 9.COM 10.11] submitted by Chile. Bailes Chinos are brotherhoods of musicians who express their faith through music, dance and singing. Organized mainly by men, dances consist of jumps and flexing movements of the legs, performed to the rhythm of flutes and percussion. The leader sings rhyming couplets that recount holy stories and address religious subjects, while a drummer leads the choreography and controls the tempo of the music. The brotherhoods function as a model for social integration and cohesion to which almost the entire local community subscribes. In its evaluation, the Subsidiary Body found that all the criteria were satisfied. The nomination adequately described the Baile Chino as the intangible cultural heritage of the entire territory of Chile, which strengthened social cohesion and integration. Similarly, the Body found that the nomination demonstrated how inscription of the element reflected cultural diversity, through the diversity of the brotherhoods, which promoted values of respect and reciprocity. The proposed safeguarding measures were adequately described and articulated, reflecting the close cooperation of the submitting State, particularly through its local governments and the groups of practitioners. The nomination also provided the consent of a large number of practitioners, as well as evidence of inscription on the national inventory. The satisfaction of the five criteria therefore followed the recommendation of the Body to include the Baile Chino on the Representative List.

550.With no objections to the adoption of the decision as a whole, the Chairperson proceeded with the adoption of the draft decision as a whole and declared adopted Decision 9.COM 11 to inscribe Baile Chino on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

551.The delegation of Chile expressed its deep gratitude to the Committee for inscribing the element on the Representative List, a brotherhood of musicians and dancers associated with the Catholic devotion of syncretic figures with participants expressing their faith through a unique style of singing, dancing and music. The first traces of Baile Chino date back to 1585 in the town of Andacollo, an event that remains in force to this day. There were currently 60 active brotherhoods of Bailes Chinos that transmit this art from generation to generation. The inscription was thus of great importance for the country, its culture and people. The delegation remarked that this was the first inscription for Chile on the Representative List, adding that it would motivate nominations in the future, as well as encourage more spaces for dialogue and exchange of experiences between the different Bailes Chinos and their members. The proposed safeguarding measures would also strengthen the groups in their regional location so as to facilitate their travel to meet and exchange experience. The delegation thanked its Latin American colleagues at the Centre for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Latin America that had encouraged the submission of the nomination. It also thanked the Subsidiary Body for its recommendations, the Committee for its generous comments and encouragement, and UNESCO as a whole.

[Film projection of Baile Chino]

552.The Chairperson congratulated Chile for its first inscription.

553.The delegation of Peru welcomed Chile’s first inscription, adding that it was absolutely sure that Baile Chino would enhance the visibility of the Representative List.

554.The delegation of Algeria thanked the Committee and the Subsidiary Body for their excellent work, and congratulated Chile for its first inscription on the Representative List. Baile Chino represented the spirit of the Convention that enriched the culture of the country and the world. It encouraged Chile to soon submit other nominations.

555.The delegation of Brazil congratulated Chile for its excellent nomination, adding that it was proud of its South American neighbours to see this element inscribed on the Representative List. It was certain that cooperation with all the other countries in South America, when an element was inscribed, reinforced the regional politics in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, and fostered cooperation, integration, and a culture of peace.

556.The delegation of India joined the other speakers in congratulating Chile on its inscription, adding that it was their first nomination although they had been part of multinational nominations.

557.The delegation of Ethiopia also extended its congratulations to Chile on its excellent first inscription, adding that it hoped that there would be many more nominations to come.

558.The delegation of Turkey remarked on yet another great success on the part of the submitting State, as well as the Subsidiary Body towards a more efficient implementation of the Convention. As its first inscription, it commended Chile, while welcoming the neighbourly and mutual cooperation demonstrated among all the relevant partners, which was a model for UNESCO in making a difference towards building peace together.

559.The Vice-Chairperson of the Subsidiary Body presented the next nomination on Torch festival of the Yi people [draft decision 9.COM 10.12] submitted by China. The Torch Festival is celebrated every year among the Yi people of southwest China to dedicate offerings to the ancestors and prayers for a bountiful harvest. This traditional festival derives its name from the torches that villagers ignite to illuminate their fields amid a host of traditional and ritual practices, games and competitions, accompanied by folk songs, festivities, dances with masks and swords, and sacrifices at the fire. The Torch Festival functions as an important bridge for social interaction and cultural reconciliation between communities of the Yi, as well as a harmonious channel for interethnic dialogue and cultural exchange. In its evaluation, the Subsidiary Body found that the criteria R.3, R.4 and R.5 were satisfied, but that the nomination lacked technical details to satisfy criteria R.1 and R.2. The Body agreed that the different proposed safeguarding measures were coherent and well structured. It also concluded that the Yi community had actively participated in the elaboration of the nomination and that the element was included on local and national inventories. However, the Body had engaged in lengthy debate on the inscription of an element – that would have international reach – which included certain practices that might be interpreted by some communities as highlighting violence towards animals during a public performance. At least three times, the file referred to fights of bulls, rams and roosters with audio-visual material displaying such images. The Body therefore found it necessary to request the submitting State to provide additional information in order to determine whether the practices were consistent with the principles of respect for the sensitivities of various communities and sustainable development. The Body emphasized that it did not question the fact that the communities themselves recognized the festival as their intangible cultural heritage, but considered that the nomination did not contain sufficient information to enable it to ensure that it met the definition of intangible cultural heritage as set out in Article 2 of the Convention, as required in criterion R.1. Considerations on criterion R.2 naturally stem from R.1. The Body was therefore unable to assess how a possible inscription could promote dialogue. Some communities were likely to be upset by the inscription of an element evoking the violent use of animals for entertainment purposes. The Subsidiary Body therefore recommended to refer the nomination to the submitting State for additional information on these aspects for resubmission in a subsequent cycle.

560.The


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src -> 8 com ith/13 com/4 Paris, 4 September 2013 Original: English
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