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I've asked the waiter for the bill but he hasn't brought it



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I've asked the waiter for the bill but he hasn't brought it .... Yet.

I've never .... a design like this before. Seen.

I've never .... anything like it before. Seen.

Japanese expression of regret and atonement are finely tuned to the circumstances. So students of etiquette were quick to note that the apology issued by Sony on Tuesday October 24th, for manufacturing occasionally inflammable laptop batteries, was less than whole-hearted. In a land where shamed executives are not shy of shedding tears during shows of contrition, the seated shallow bow performed by some of the Japanese electronic giant's bosses was deemed a middling act of corporate obeisance. Sony's apology is part of a growing trend for business leaders to say sorry to consumers (and sometimes to workers and shareholders) for corporate shortcomings. Of late, Steve Jobs was widely praised for taking responsibility for Apple's problems over the backdating of share-options. Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard's boss, got a critical reaction to his more equivocal "apology" for a recent scandal that swept the American tech firm. As companies appear to be quicker at accepting the blame for failures, the timing and scope of their apologies are coming under ever-greater scrutiny. The oft-touted example of an exemplary corporate reaction to trouble is that of Johnson & Johnson in the early 1980s after several people died after taking a drug called Tylenol. Though the product had been deliberately poisoned with cyanide while on shop shelves the firm's chief executive apologized repeatedly and profusely, production ceased and over 30m bottles were recalled at a cost of some $100m. Despite huge public disquiet about the drug at the time, sales of Tylenol quickly recovered. The "timing and scope" of their apologies refers to..... When they apologize and the reason for their apology.

Japanese expression of regret and atonement are finely tuned to the circumstances. So students of etiquette were quick to note that the apology issued by Sony on Tuesday October 24th, for manufacturing occasionally inflammable laptop batteries, was less than whole-hearted. In a land where shamed executives are not shy of shedding tears during shows of contrition, the seated shallow bow performed by some of the Japanese electronic giant's bosses was deemed a middling act of corporate obeisance. Sony's apology is part of a growing trend for business leaders to say sorry to consumers (and sometimes to workers and shareholders) for corporate shortcomings. Of late, Steve Jobs was widely praised for taking responsibility for Apple's problems over the backdating of share-options. Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard's boss, got a critical reaction to his more equivocal "apology" for a recent scandal that swept the American tech firm. As companies appear to be quicker at accepting the blame for failures, the timing and scope of their apologies are coming under ever-greater scrutiny. The oft-touted example of an exemplary corporate reaction to trouble is that of Johnson & Johnson in the early 1980s after several people died after taking a drug called Tylenol. Though the product had been deliberately poisoned with cyanide while on shop shelves the firm's chief executive apologized repeatedly and profusely, production ceased and over 30m bottles were recalled at a cost of some $100m. Despite huge public disquiet about the drug at the time, sales of Tylenol quickly recovered. In this article, "finely tuned" means.... Adjusted specifically to.

Japanese expression of regret and atonement are finely tuned to the circumstances. So students of etiquette were quick to note that the apology issued by Sony on Tuesday October 24th, for manufacturing occasionally inflammable laptop batteries, was less than whole-hearted. In a land where shamed executives are not shy of shedding tears during shows of contrition, the seated shallow bow performed by some of the Japanese electronic giant's bosses was deemed a middling act of corporate obeisance. Sony's apology is part of a growing trend for business leaders to say sorry to consumers (and sometimes to workers and shareholders) for corporate shortcomings. Of late, Steve Jobs was widely praised for taking responsibility for Apple's problems over the backdating of share-options. Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard's boss, got a critical reaction to his more equivocal "apology" for a recent scandal that swept the American tech firm. As companies appear to be quicker at accepting the blame for failures, the timing and scope of their apologies are coming under ever-greater scrutiny. The oft-touted example of an exemplary corporate reaction to trouble is that of Johnson & Johnson in the early 1980s after several people died after taking a drug called Tylenol. Though the product had been deliberately poisoned with cyanide while on shop shelves the firm's chief executive apologized repeatedly and profusely, production ceased and over 30m bottles were recalled at a cost of some $100m. Despite huge public disquiet about the drug at the time, sales of Tylenol quickly recovered. "Shortcomings" are.... Faults.

Japanese expression of regret and atonement are finely tuned to the circumstances. So students of etiquette were quick to note that the apology issued by Sony on Tuesday October 24th, for manufacturing occasionally inflammable laptop batteries, was less than whole-hearted. In a land where shamed executives are not shy of shedding tears during shows of contrition, the seated shallow bow performed by some of the Japanese electronic giant's bosses was deemed a middling act of corporate obeisance. Sony's apology is part of a growing trend for business leaders to say sorry to consumers (and sometimes to workers and shareholders) for corporate shortcomings. Of late, Steve Jobs was widely praised for taking responsibility for Apple's problems over the backdating of share-options. Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard's boss, got a critical reaction to his more equivocal "apology" for a recent scandal that swept the American tech firm. As companies appear to be quicker at accepting the blame for failures, the timing and scope of their apologies are coming under ever-greater scrutiny. The oft-touted example of an exemplary corporate reaction to trouble is that of Johnson & Johnson in the early 1980s after several people died after taking a drug called Tylenol. Though the product had been deliberately poisoned with cyanide while on shop shelves the firm's chief executive apologized repeatedly and profusely, production ceased and over 30m bottles were recalled at a cost of some $100m. Despite huge public disquiet about the drug at the time, sales of Tylenol quickly recovered. Another word for "whole-hearted" is.... Sincere.

Japanese expression of regret and atonement are finely tuned to the circumstances. So students of etiquette were quick to note that the apology issued by Sony on Tuesday October 24th, for manufacturing occasionally inflammable laptop batteries, was less than whole-hearted. In a land where shamed executives are not shy of shedding tears during shows of contrition, the seated shallow bow performed by some of the Japanese electronic giant's bosses was deemed a middling act of corporate obeisance. Sony's apology is part of a growing trend for business leaders to say sorry to consumers (and sometimes to workers and shareholders) for corporate shortcomings. Of late, Steve Jobs was widely praised for taking responsibility for Apple's problems over the backdating of share-options. Mark Hurd, Hewlett-Packard's boss, got a critical reaction to his more equivocal "apology" for a recent scandal that swept the American tech firm. As companies appear to be quicker at accepting the blame for failures, the timing and scope of their apologies are coming under ever-greater scrutiny. The oft-touted example of an exemplary corporate reaction to trouble is that of Johnson & Johnson in the early 1980s after several people died after taking a drug called Tylenol. Though the product had been deliberately poisoned with cyanide while on shop shelves the firm's chief executive apologized repeatedly and profusely, production ceased and over 30m bottles were recalled at a cost of some $100m. Despite huge public disquiet about the drug at the time, sales of Tylenol quickly recovered. In this article, "oft-touted" means.... Frequently mentioned.

Large factories are .... to produce several models. Able.

Large factories are _____________ to produce several models. Able.

Leave everything as it ..... Is.

Let's go out, .... Shall we?.

Let's go out, ....? Shall we.

Life would be much simpler if you _______________ worrying so much. Stopped.

Marconi will soon ....JTC Ltd. Take over.

Maria's coffee bar was ____________ she decided to franchise it. So successful that.

Millions of people in the world live in dreadful .... Conditions.

Most carmakers have .... It hard to increase profit. Found.

Mr. Smith doesn't work ______ Fridays or ________ weekends. On / at.

Mr. Smith doesn't work __________________ Fridays. On.

Neither you .... Tom should use that knife! Nor.

Never .... such a beautiful church! Have I seen.

No names have yet .... made. Been.

Not only did my husband make me dinner, he __________________did the washing up! Even.

Of all my friends, Tom is the one I like the .... . Most.

On second thought, your solution seems the best. Ripensandoci bene, la tua soluzione sembra la migliore.

Once a list of suitable candidates ___________________ we can contact __________ to arrange interviews. Has been drawn up / them.

One way to describe dishonest accountancy is 'creative accountancy'. Which of these idiomatic phrases means the same? to cook the books

Only one of these sentences is correct. Which one? I would never do anything like that

Perhaps we .... check the figures again to make sure we haven't made any mistakes. Should.

Planes travel .... than trains, but getting on and off planes at airports is very slow. More quickly.

Please, hurry up! I have to call Jim __________ 5 o'clock. By.

Red wine _________________ to benefit circulation. Has been found.

Serena: "My daughter's been promoted to General Manager." Tom: "_________________? You must be so proud!" Has she.

She .... here since 1988. And she's still with us. Has worked.

She admitted to .... the handbag. Stealing.

She can't play the piano! In fact, she's .... Hopeless.

She can't stand .... by herself! Working.

She fainted, but came to shortly afterward. E' svenuta, ma ha ripreso conoscenza poco dopo.

She felt ______________ when she first arrived because she had __________ to talk to. Lonely / nobody.

She regards ____________ as a failure for having dropped out ______ university. Herself / of.

She stopped .... last year. Smoking.

She suggested I .... you. Call.

She's a .... nicer person than I thought she was. Much.

She's not very keen _____________ basketball. On.

She's the .... intelligent of the girls. Least.

Shut the door on your way out, ....? Will you.

Silvia's flight from Sao Paolo took more than 10 hours. She ______________ be exhausted after such a long flight. Must.

Some new shares have just been .... Issued.

Telling lies never.... Pays.

That theory will never hold water. Quella teoria non reggerà mai.

The "Mayor of London" is a .... Person.

The accident ________________ at 9 p.m. and the ambulance arrived within 10 minutes. Was reported.

The bank wouldn't change any money for me. I had no means of .... Identification.

The boy admitted _____________ the toy. Breaking.

The company is thinking about .... some managers. Removing.

The company spent over six million dollars on improving safety. The scheme was a big success. Now, the firm has .... accidents. Fewer.

The company took .... shortly after the deal. Over.

The cottage is .... fire. On.

The dish is normally .... at Christmas. Eaten.

The door of the plane is open. Is everybody ready? Ok .... jump! Let's.

The engine is still working; so far so good. Il motore funziona ancora; fino ad ora è andata bene.

The European Commission yesterday issued a harsh warning to businesses seeking to run cartels by fining eight vitamin producers a total of 855 million Euros (£530 million) for fixing prices for almost a decade. Roche, the Swiss drugs group, was fined 462 million in the highest award to date imposed by the EU on a single company for market abuse. BASF, the German chemical group, was fined 296 million for its part in the cartel, which was known as Vitamins Inc and was exposed in 1999. Both BASF, which described its fine as "inappropriately high", and Roche are considering an appeal. Competition experts said the huge fines underlined the EU's commitment to crackdown on restrictive business practices. Aventis, the French drugs group, escaped fines in connection to two vitamins in return for co-operating with inquiries. Samantha Mobley, EU competition partner at the law firm Baker & McKenzie, said: "It is the first time a company has achieved a 100 per cent reduction in a fine, illustrating the EU's commitment to encourage whistle-blowers". According to the second paragraph of the passage, vitamin producers were.... Punished.

The European Commission yesterday issued a harsh warning to businesses seeking to run cartels by fining eight vitamin producers a total of 855 million Euros (£530 million) for fixing prices for almost a decade. Roche, the Swiss drugs group, was fined 462 million in the highest award to date imposed by the EU on a single company for market abuse. BASF, the German chemical group, was fined 296 million for its part in the cartel, which was known as Vitamins Inc and was exposed in 1999. Both BASF, which described its fine as "inappropriately high", and Roche are considering an appeal. Competition experts said the huge fines underlined the EU's commitment to crackdown on restrictive business practices. Aventis, the French drugs group, escaped fines in connection to two vitamins in return for co-operating with inquiries. Samantha Mobley, EU competition partner at the law firm Baker & McKenzie, said: "It is the first time a company has achieved a 100 per cent reduction in a fine, illustrating the EU's commitment to encourage whistle-blowers". "A harsh warning" is .... A severe warning.

The European Commission yesterday issued a harsh warning to businesses seeking to run cartels by fining eight vitamin producers a total of 855 million Euros (£530 million) for fixing prices for almost a decade. Roche, the Swiss drugs group, was fined 462 million in the highest award to date imposed by the EU on a single company for market abuse. BASF, the German chemical group, was fined 296 million for its part in the cartel, which was known as Vitamins Inc and was exposed in 1999. Both BASF, which described its fine as "inappropriately high", and Roche are considering an appeal. Competition experts said the huge fines underlined the EU's commitment to crackdown on restrictive business practices. Aventis, the French drugs group, escaped fines in connection to two vitamins in return for co-operating with inquiries. Samantha Mobley, EU competition partner at the law firm Baker & McKenzie, said: "It is the first time a company has achieved a 100 per cent reduction in a fine, illustrating the EU's commitment to encourage whistle-blowers". "Roche was fined" means.... Roche was penalised.

The European Commission yesterday issued a harsh warning to businesses seeking to run cartels by fining eight vitamin producers a total of 855 million Euros (£530 million) for fixing prices for almost a decade. Roche, the Swiss drugs group, was fined 462 million in the highest award to date imposed by the EU on a single company for market abuse. BASF, the German chemical group, was fined 296 million for its part in the cartel, which was known as Vitamins Inc and was exposed in 1999. Both BASF, which described its fine as "inappropriately high", and Roche are considering an appeal. Competition experts said the huge fines underlined the EU's commitment to crackdown on restrictive business practices. Aventis, the French drugs group, escaped fines in connection to two vitamins in return for co-operating with inquiries. Samantha Mobley, EU competition partner at the law firm Baker & McKenzie, said: "It is the first time a company has achieved a 100 per cent reduction in a fine, illustrating the EU's commitment to encourage whistle-blowers". According to BASF, the fine was "inappropriately high". In other words,.... It was far too high.

The European Commission yesterday issued a harsh warning to businesses seeking to run cartels by fining eight vitamin producers a total of 855 million Euros (£530 million) for fixing prices for almost a decade. Roche, the Swiss drugs group, was fined 462 million in the highest award to date imposed by the EU on a single company for market abuse. BASF, the German chemical group, was fined 296 million for its part in the cartel, which was known as Vitamins Inc and was exposed in 1999. Both BASF, which described its fine as "inappropriately high", and Roche are considering an appeal. Competition experts said the huge fines underlined the EU's commitment to crackdown on restrictive business practices. Aventis, the French drugs group, escaped fines in connection to two vitamins in return for co-operating with inquiries. Samantha Mobley, EU competition partner at the law firm Baker & McKenzie, said: "It is the first time a company has achieved a 100 per cent reduction in a fine, illustrating the EU's commitment to encourage whistle-blowers". A "law firm" deals with.... Legal matters.

The fallout from the global slowdown in the airline industry is still casting a shadow over airline suppliers, despite the resurgence of budget airlines. L Gardner, the engineering company, said yesterday that it had got rid of its final dividend and would cut 250 staff in the face of uncertain short-term prospects after the events of September 11. The supplier to Boeing and Rolls-Royce said that it would cut about 10 per cent of its workforce in a cost-cutting drive, announced last month, to pre-empt lower business levels. The group, which generates two-thirds of its income from making aircraft components, also said it felt that it was inappropriate to pay a dividend. Brett Welch, the finance director, said the cost-cutting exercise would help the company when the airline industry returned to normality. Separately, Ryanair, the no-frills Republic of Ireland airline, is expected to confirm Frankfurt as its second European hub today. The move, eagerly anticipated by observers in the airlines sector, would enable the budget airline to step up its efforts to take cost-conscious business passengers from the flag carriers. If you "step up" your efforts you will..... Increase them.

The fallout from the global slowdown in the airline industry is still casting a shadow over airline suppliers, despite the resurgence of budget airlines. L Gardner, the engineering company, said yesterday that it had got rid of its final dividend and would cut 250 staff in the face of uncertain short-term prospects after the events of September 11. The supplier to Boeing and Rolls-Royce said that it would cut about 10 per cent of its workforce in a cost-cutting drive, announced last month, to pre-empt lower business levels. The group, which generates two-thirds of its income from making aircraft components, also said it felt that it was inappropriate to pay a dividend. Brett Welch, the finance director, said the cost-cutting exercise would help the company when the airline industry returned to normality. Separately, Ryanair, the no-frills Republic of Ireland airline, is expected to confirm Frankfurt as its second European hub today. The move, eagerly anticipated by observers in the airlines sector, would enable the budget airline to step up its efforts to take cost-conscious business passengers from the flag carriers. A "flag carrier" is a .... National airline.

The fallout from the global slowdown in the airline industry is still casting a shadow over airline suppliers, despite the resurgence of budget airlines. L Gardner, the engineering company, said yesterday that it had got rid of its final dividend and would cut 250 staff in the face of uncertain short-term prospects after the events of September 11. The supplier to Boeing and Rolls-Royce said that it would cut about 10 per cent of its workforce in a cost-cutting drive, announced last month, to pre-empt lower business levels. The group, which generates two-thirds of its income from making aircraft components, also said it felt that it was inappropriate to pay a dividend. Brett Welch, the finance director, said the cost-cutting exercise would help the company when the airline industry returned to normality. Separately, Ryanair, the no-frills Republic of Ireland airline, is expected to confirm Frankfurt as its second European hub today. The move, eagerly anticipated by observers in the airlines sector, would enable the budget airline to step up its efforts to take cost-conscious business passengers from the flag carriers. "A cost-cutting drive" refers to an.... Attempt to cut costs.

The fallout from the global slowdown in the airline industry is still casting a shadow over airline suppliers, despite the resurgence of budget airlines. L Gardner, the engineering company, said yesterday that it had got rid of its final dividend and would cut 250 staff in the face of uncertain short-term prospects after the events of September 11. The supplier to Boeing and Rolls-Royce said that it would cut about 10 per cent of its workforce in a cost-cutting drive, announced last month, to pre-empt lower business levels. The group, which generates two-thirds of its income from making aircraft components, also said it felt that it was inappropriate to pay a dividend. Brett Welch, the finance director, said the cost-cutting exercise would help the company when the airline industry returned to normality. Separately, Ryanair, the no-frills Republic of Ireland airline, is expected to confirm Frankfurt as its second European hub today. The move, eagerly anticipated by observers in the airlines sector, would enable the budget airline to step up its efforts to take cost-conscious business passengers from the flag carriers. A "cost-conscious passenger" wants.... Cost-effective service.

The fallout from the global slowdown in the airline industry is still casting a shadow over airline suppliers, despite the resurgence of budget airlines. L Gardner, the engineering company, said yesterday that it had got rid of its final dividend and would cut 250 staff in the face of uncertain short-term prospects after the events of September 11. The supplier to Boeing and Rolls-Royce said that it would cut about 10 per cent of its workforce in a cost-cutting drive, announced last month, to pre-empt lower business levels. The group, which generates two-thirds of its income from making aircraft components, also said it felt that it was inappropriate to pay a dividend. Brett Welch, the finance director, said the cost-cutting exercise would help the company when the airline industry returned to normality. Separately, Ryanair, the no-frills Republic of Ireland airline, is expected to confirm Frankfurt as its second European hub today. The move, eagerly anticipated by observers in the airlines sector, would enable the budget airline to step up its efforts to take cost-conscious business passengers from the flag carriers. If "you cast a shadow" you.... Negatively influence it.



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