Year 7 plan — Australian Curriculum: History



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Year 7 plan — Australian Curriculum: History


Implementation year: 2013 School name: Exemplar

Identify Curriculum

Phase curriculum focus and Year level description

Curriculum focus: World and Australian history, the analysis and use of sources, and historical interpretation.

Year 7 level description: The Ancient World

The Year 7 curriculum provides a study of history from the time of the earliest human communities to the end of the ancient period, approximately 60 000 BC (BCE) – c.650 AD (CE). It was a period defined by the development of cultural practices and organised societies. The study of the ancient world includes the discoveries (the remains of the past and what we know) and the mysteries (what we do not know) about this period of history, in a range of societies including Australia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, China and India.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated way; and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this year level are:


  • How do we know about the ancient past?

  • Why and where did the earliest societies develop?

  • What emerged as the defining characteristics of ancient societies?

  • What have been the legacies of ancient societies?

Achievement standard

By the end of Year 7, students suggest reasons for change and continuity over time. They describe the effects of change on societies, individuals and groups. They describe events and developments from the perspective of different people who lived at the time. Students explain the role of groups and the significance of particular individuals in society. They identify past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, using dating conventions to represent and measure time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify and select a range of sources and locate, compare and use information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to explain points of view. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, incorporate relevant sources, and acknowledge their sources of information.



Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10

Teaching and learning

Course outline (overview and depth studies)

This Year 7 History course introduces students to the ancient world — 60 000 BC (BCE) – c.650 AD (CE) — and spans from the earliest human communities to what many historians consider to be the end of the ancient period. A key focus of this course is the development of cultural practices and organised societies and the similarities and variations that occurred over time and in different places. Additionally, the legacies of these societies evident in the modern world are considered.

The course been developed in three units based on the depth studies: Investigating the ancient past, The Asian world and The Mediterranean world. The electives chosen from the depth studies aim to provide a balance of time and place across the ancient world, framed by the first depth study that requires students to build on and consolidate their understanding of historical inquiry using a range of sources for the study of the ancient past. Students investigate ancient China followed by ancient Rome and apply their knowledge about evidence of the ancient past to these civilisations.

The overview content is integrated primarily into the first depth study and involves students exploring the “out of Africa” theory and the movement of peoples, as well as the evidence of the emergence and establishment of ancient societies, while looking at how the ancient past is investigated. The study of the key features of ancient societies is part of all three depth studies, with the study of China and Rome offering both a contrast and comparison of different ancient civilisations.


Unit overview

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Depth study: Investigating the ancient past (exemplar unit)

In this introductory depth study, students build on and develop their understandings of historical inquiry in the context of the ancient world. They explore some of the important features and events of the ancient period, and how these features and events have shaped the modern world. In this context, this unit focuses on ancient Australia in some depth and develops understandings of the longevity and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, perspectives and significance.

Students will:



  • sequence historical events, developments and periods of the major ancient Mediterranean and Asian civilisations, using the language and measures of time and chronology

Depth study: The Asian world

Elective: China

In this depth study, students investigate the features of ancient China as a major Asian civilisation and study how these features have shaped and impacted the modern Chinese nation, the Asian region and the world.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability.

Students will:



  • sequence historical events and developments related to ancient China

  • use historical terms and concepts related to studying the ancient world and be introduced to new terms and concepts used in studying ancient China

Depth study: The Mediterranean world

Elective: Rome

In this depth study, students investigate and develop an appreciation of the features of ancient Rome, and the legacy ancient Mediterranean societies have on the modern world.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability.

Students will:



  • sequence historical events and developments related to ancient Rome

  • use historical terms and concepts related to studying the ancient world and be introduced to new terms and concepts used in studying ancient Rome, including “funerary customs”, “Roman Empire”, “Roman Republic”

Teaching and learning




  • use historical terms and concepts such as “historical sources”, “evidence”, “society”, “civilisations”, “timeline”, “historian”, “archaeologist”, “excavation”, “archival research” and “oral history”

  • explore the “out of Africa” theory and patterns of the movement of humans across other continents over time

  • examine how historians and archaeologists investigate ancient history and explore the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies and key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law)

  • examine the methods and sources used to investigate a historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists

  • identify the processes used for conserving the remains of the ancient past and explain the importance of conservation strategies used in this area

  • identify a range of questions about the important features and events of the ancient period, and how these features and events have shaped the modern world, including a focus on ancient Australia

  • identify and locate relevant sources that may support the emergence of organised states in ancient societies and changes in how people lived, using ICT and other methods

  • identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources and examine the nature of sources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, including how these sources reveal where and how people lived

  • locate, compare, select and use information from a range of sources as evidence to investigate how historical sources are used to develop responses to historical questions and draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources

  • identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary and secondary sources and how evidence from these sources is tentative, evolving and interpretative

  • develop texts about the important features and events of the ancient period, and how these features and events have shaped the modern world, including ancient Australia, using evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged and a range of communication forms and digital technologies.

  • explore key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law)

  • identify a range of questions about the past to inform a historical inquiry about ancient China as a major Asian civilisation

  • identify and locate relevant sources related to physical features of China, the roles of key groups and individuals in ancient Chinese society, significant beliefs, values and practices, and contacts and conflicts within and/or with other societies

  • identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources, and explain the different interpretations of key events in ancient China and why developments in the past can be interpreted in different ways

  • locate, compare, select and use information from a range of sources as evidence to investigate how historical sources are used to develop responses to historical questions and draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources

  • identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary and secondary sources, e.g. examine sources to form a point of view on the organisation of ancient Chinese society, particularly the influence of law and religion, and the roles of, and relationships between, groups (such as kings, emperors, scholars, craftsmen, women)

  • develop texts about the important features and events of ancient Chinese society, and how these features and events have shaped the modern world, using evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged and a range of communication forms and digital technologies.

  • explore key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law)

  • identify a range of questions about the past to inform historical inquiry about ancient Rome and the legacy of ancient Mediterranean societies

  • identify and locate relevant sources on how people lived in ancient Rome, using ICT and other methods, and identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources

  • locate, compare, select and use a range of sources as evidence (primary and secondary, visual and written, official and vernacular) to investigate the geographical, political, social and cultural aspects of ancient Rome and draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources

  • discuss the relative worth of each source, model the selection of the best of these sources to use, and record details of sources that are used

  • identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary and secondary sources, e.g. examine sources to form a point of view on the organisation of Roman society, particularly the influence of law and religion; the roles of patricians, plebeians and women; and the significance of slavery to the Empire

  • develop texts about the important features, events and significant individuals of ancient Roman society, and how these features and events have shaped the modern world, using evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged and a range of communication forms and digital technologies.




Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives

History provides opportunities for students to strengthen their appreciation and understanding of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their living cultures. Specific content and skills within relevant sections of the curriculum can be drawn upon to encourage engagement with:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander frameworks of knowing and ways of learning

  • Indigenous contexts in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live

  • Aboriginal peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ contributions to Australian society and cultures.

The Australian Curriculum: History values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. For Aboriginal and Torres Islander students, it provides an opportunity to see themselves within the curriculum and in an educational setting that respects and promotes their cultural identities. Students are taught that Australian Aboriginal societies are the longest surviving societies in the world and that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are two distinct groups. Students learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander occupation of the continent prior to colonisation by the British, and the ensuing contact and conflict between these societies. Students develop an awareness of the resilience of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the ways in which their expertise and experiences in contemporary science, education, the arts, sport and tourism; their inventions; and their knowledge of medicine have contributed to the development of a culturally diverse Australian society.



Teaching and learning

General capabilities and crosscurriculum priorities

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: description: gc_literacy description: description: description: gc_numeracy description: description: description: gc_ict description: description: description: gc_critical description: description: description: gc_ethical description: description: description: gc_intercultural

description: cc_asia

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: description: gc_literacy description: description: description: gc_numeracy description: description: description: gc_ict description: description: description: gc_critical description: description: gc_personal_social description: description: description: gc_ethical description: description: description: gc_intercultural

description: description: cc_asiadescription: cc_sust

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: description: gc_literacy description: description: description: gc_numeracy description: description: description: gc_ict description: description: description: gc_critical description: description: description: gc_ethical description: description: description: gc_intercultural

description: description: cc_asia description: description: cc_sust

Key to general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities

description: description: gc_literacy Literacy  description: description: gc_numeracy Numeracy  description: description: gc_ict ICT capability  description: description: gc_critical Critical and creative thinking  description: description: gc_personal_social Personal and social capability  description: description: gc_ethical Ethical behaviour description: description: gc_intercultural Intercultural understanding

 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures  description: cc_asia Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia  description: cc_sust Sustainability

Develop assessment

Assessment

For advice and guidelines on assessment, see: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

The following assessment will provide a targeted selection of evidence of student learning across different assessment techniques and instruments. This evidence will be collected in a folio to make an overall on-balance judgment about student achievement and progress at appropriate points, and to inform the reporting process.

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Assessment

Assessment

Assessment

Research: Response to historical evidence (Spoken/signed or multimodal)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ abilities to research, collect, analyse and draw conclusions about historical sources.

Students present a spoken or multimodal response explaining, with references to evidence and sources, a historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists OR an issue related to the preservation of the remains of the ancient past.


Supervised assessment: Extended response to historical sources (Written)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ responses that are produced independently, under supervision and in a set time frame.

Students consider a range of sources about ancient Chinese civilisation including:


  • the physical features, key events and developments that shaped this civilisation

  • significant individuals from ancient China

  • traditional Chinese social structures,

  • law , religion, significant beliefs, values and practices of Chinese society

Students write an extended response to historical sources that puts forward a point of view supported by the interpretation, analysis and evaluation of evidence. The historical sources will be both seen and unseen.

Supervised assessment: Responses to historical evidence (Written)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ responses that are produced independently, under supervision and in a set time frame.

Students respond to a series of questions, based on a selection of historical sources (primary and secondary, visual and written, official and vernacular), about:


  • the physical features of ancient Rome that influenced the civilisation

  • the daily lives of key groups in ancient Roman society, and significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient Romans

  • the contacts and conflict within and/or with other societies, resulting in developments such as the expansion of trade, the rise of the Roman empire and the spread of religious beliefs

  • significant figures from ancient Rome.

The student responses required will vary in length and require the interpretation, analysis and evaluation of historical sources, both seen and unseen.

Research: Assignment (Written/spoken/signed)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ abilities to research, collect, analyse and draw conclusions about historical sources.

Students use a historical inquiry process to research an artefact from ancient Australian to explain the purpose and significance of the artefact.








Make judgments and use feedback

Moderation

Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers cross-mark tasks to ensure consistency of judgments.



Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers calibrate A–E samples of student work that link to the standards before marking tasks. They moderate to ensure consistency of judgments.

Teachers select representative folios and meet to ensure consistency of judgments before marking tasks.


Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers calibrate A–E samples of student work that link to the standards before marking tasks. They moderate to ensure consistency of judgments.

Teachers select representative folios and meet to ensure consistency of judgments before marking tasks.


Year 7 History: review for balance and coverage of content descriptions, including emphasis on historical understandings

Historical Knowledge and Understanding




Historical Skills










Historical Knowledge

1

2

3

Historical Understandings1

The key concepts of historical understanding are:



1

2

3




Historical Skills

1

2

3

The Ancient World: Overview

Evidence

Information obtained from historical sources used to construct an explanation or narrative, to support a hypothesis, or prove or disprove a conclusion.












Chronology, terms and concepts

Overview content for the ancient world (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Greece, Rome, India, China and the Maya) includes the following:










Sequence historical events, developments and periods (ACHHS205)







Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS206)







  • the theory that people moved out of Africa around
    60 000 BC (BCE) and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia









Continuity and change

Continuities are aspects of the past that have remained the same over certain periods of time. Changes are events or developments from the past that represent modifications, alterations and transformations.













Historical questions and research

Identify a range of questions about the past to inform a historical inquiry (ACHHS207)







  • the evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery)









Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS208)







  • key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law)







Cause and effect

The relationship between a factor or set of factors (cause/s) and consequence/s (effect/s). These form sequences of events and developments over time.










Analysis and use of sources

Identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS209)







Investigating the ancient past

Perspectives

A point of view or position from which events are seen and understood, and influenced by age, gender, culture, social position and beliefs and values.












Locate, compare, select and use information from a range of sources as evidence (ACHHS210)







How historians and archaeologists investigate history, including excavation and archival research (ACDSEH001)









Draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources (ACHHS211)







The range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation, including archaeological and written sources (ACDSEH029)









Empathy

An understanding of the past from the point of view of the participant/s, including an appreciation of the circumstances faced, and the motivations, values and attitudes behind actions.













Perspectives and interpretations

Identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary and secondary sources (ACHHS212)







Explanation and communication

The methods and sources used to investigate at least ONE historical controversy or mystery that has challenged historians or archaeologists, such as in the analysis of unidentified human remains (ACDSEH030)









Significance

The importance that is assigned to particular aspects of the past, such as events, developments, movements and historical sites, and includes an examination of the principles behind the selection of what should be investigated and remembered.









Develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations that use evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged (ACHHS213)







Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS214)







The nature of the sources for ancient Australia and what they reveal about Australia’s past in the ancient period, such as the use of resources (ACDSEH031)









Contestability

Debate about particular interpretations of the past as a result of the nature of available evidence and/or different perspectives.

























The importance of conserving the remains of the ancient past, including the heritage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples (ACDSEH148)




































The Mediterranean world: Rome




























The physical features of ancient Rome (such as the River Tiber) and how they influenced the civilisation that developed there (ACDSEH004)









Roles of key groups in ancient Roman society (such as patricians, plebeians, women, slaves), including the influence of law and religion (ACDSEH038)




































The significant beliefs, values and practices of the ancient Romans, with a particular emphasis on ONE of the following areas: everyday life, warfare, or death and funerary customs (ACDSEH039)









Contacts and conflicts within and/or with other societies, resulting in developments such as the expansion of trade, the rise of the Roman empire (including its material remains), and the spread of religious beliefs (ACDSEH040)




































The role of a significant individual in ancient Rome’s history such as Julius Caesar or Augustus (ACDSEH131)









The Asian world: China

The physical features of China (such as the Yellow River) and how they influenced the civilisation that developed there (ACDSEH005)









Roles of key groups in Chinese society in this period (such as kings, emperors, scholars, craftsmen, women), including the influence of law and religion (ACDSEH041)









The significant beliefs, values and practices of Chinese society, with a particular emphasis on ONE of the following areas: everyday life, warfare, or death and funerary customs (ACDSEH042)









Contacts and conflicts within and/or with other societies, resulting in developments such as the expansion of trade, the rise of Imperial China (including its material remains), and the spread of philosophies and beliefs (ACDSEH043)









The role of a significant individual in ancient Chinese history such as Confucius or Qin Shi Huang (ACDSEH132)









Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10

1 The historical understandings are derived from the content descriptions and achievement standards, and are supported by Historical Skills. The Year level description provides information about the development of historical understandings through the key concepts. The definitions of historical understandings are based on the glossary terms published in Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation-10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10.

Queensland Studies Authority October 2012 |


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