Year 10 plan — Australian Curriculum: History



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Year 10 plan — Australian Curriculum: History


Implementation year: 2012 School name: Exemplar

Identify curriculum

Phase curriculum focus and Year level description

Curriculum focus: World and Australian history, the analysis and use of sources, and historical interpretation.

Year 10 level description: The Modern World and Australia

The Year 10 curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing.

The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.

The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and should be taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this year level are:


  • How did the nature of global conflict change during the twentieth century?

  • What were the consequences of World War II? How did these consequences shape the modern world?

  • How was Australian society affected by other significant global events and changes in this period?

Achievement standard

By the end of Year 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame an historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose, and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.



Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10

Course outline (overview and depth studies)

The Year 10 History course provides opportunities for students to understand key events that have shaped world history and impacted upon Australia from 1918 to the present. A key emphasis is on Australia in its global context, and the twentieth century as a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The legacies of how these developments are evident today are also considered. The course has been developed in three units based on the depth studies: World War II, Rights and Freedoms and The Globalising World. The elective chosen from the third depth study provides an opportunity for students to investigate the consequences of the significant impact that World War II had on Australia socially, culturally and economically.

The overview content associated with the inter-war years and post-World War II efforts to achieve lasting peace and security are primarily integrated into the first depth study. Australia’s involvement in the Cold War, including conflicts during and after this era, is studied within the context of the consequences of World War II. Similarly, this context is applied to a study of major movements for rights and freedoms in the world, the achievement of independence by colonies in the Asia-Pacific and Australia’s migration experiences from 1945 to the present.



Teaching and learning

Unit overview

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Depth study: World War II

In this depth study, students investigate wartime experiences through an in-depth study of World War II. This includes a study of the causes, events, outcomes and broader impact of the conflict as an episode in world history, and the nature of Australia’s involvement.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy and significance.

Students will:



  • use chronological sequencing to construct a timeline identifying key events in the European theatre of war, for example Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939, the Holocaust from 1942–45, and the Russians reaching Berlin in 1945

Depth study: Rights and freedoms (exemplar unit)

In this depth study, students focus on the struggles for human rights. They investigate how rights and freedoms have been ignored, demanded or achieved in Australia and in the broader world context.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability.

Students will:



  • use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events in different geographical locations

  • use terms and concepts such as “liberation”, “human rights” and “contestability”

Depth study: The globalising world

Elective: Migration experiences

In this depth study, students investigate the influence of migration experiences on the shape of Australian society from 1945 to the present. They explore how Australia’s World War II experiences, and events in Asia in the post-World War II era, have contributed to migration experiences.

This depth study provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, significance and contestability.

Students will:



  • use historical terms and concepts such as “migration”, “immigration”, “populate or perish” and “refugees”

  • identify, select, evaluate and enhance different kinds of questions about the influence of migration experiences on Australian society from 1945 to the present

Teaching and learning




  • use historical terms and concepts such as “historical sources”, “primary and secondary sources”, “evidence”, “chronology”, “timeline”, “perspective” and “historiography”

  • identify, select, evaluate and enhance different kinds of questions about World War II to inquire about causes, events, outcomes and the broader impact of the conflict as an episode in world history, and the nature of Australia’s involvement

  • identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods, to consider the importance of historiography in evaluating evidence of Australia’s World War II experiences and involvement in international events from 1945 to the present

  • identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources and evaluate their reliability and usefulness when examining the significant events, experiences and impact of World War II, including the Holocaust and the atomic bomb

  • process and synthesise information from a range of sources to identify and explain the impact and significance of World War II to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century, with particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia

  • identify and analyse different perspectives and historical interpretations (including their own) of the experiences of Australian people and the Australian home front as a result of World War II

  • develop texts, using evidence from a range of sources, that describe and discuss the causes, events, outcomes, impacts and experiences of World War II.

  • identify, select, evaluate and enhance different kinds of questions about the struggles for human rights in Australia and the broader world context, including the US civil rights movement and Australia’s involvement in the development in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

  • identify and locate sources, using ICT and other methods, to explore the background to the struggles for rights and freedoms in the world context and in Australia, in particular civil rights events for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, such as the right to vote federally, reconciliation, the Mabo decision, the Bringing them home report, and the Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples

  • identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources and evaluate their reliability and usefulness when examining the background to the struggles for rights and freedoms in the world context and in Australia, in particular for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

  • identify and analyse perspectives and historical interpretations of how human rights have developed from 1945 to the present, and the continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world

  • investigate methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

  • develop texts, using a range of communication forms, to discuss evidence from a range of sources and describe and discuss rights and freedoms in Australia and the broader world context from 1945 to the present.

  • identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods, to investigate the waves of migration to Australia post-1945 as a consequence of events during World War II and Australia’s war time experiences

  • identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources, and evaluate their reliability and usefulness in identifying historical trends in migration over time

  • process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in a historical argument that explores the waves of post-World War II migration to Australia, including significant world events and government policy

  • identify and analyse the perspectives and historical interpretations (including their own) of government policies, and the contribution of migration to Australia’s changing identity and its international relationships

  • investigate the impact of a world event or development and its significance for Australia, such as the Vietnam War and Indochinese refugees

  • develop texts, using a range of communication forms, to discuss evidence from a range of sources and describe and discuss the influence of migration experiences on Australian society from 1945 to the present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives

History provides opportunities for students to strengthen their appreciation and understanding of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their living cultures. Specific content and skills within relevant sections of the curriculum can be drawn upon to encourage engagement with:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander frameworks of knowing and ways of learning

  • Indigenous contexts in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live

  • Aboriginal peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ contributions to Australian society and cultures.

The Australian Curriculum: History values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. For Aboriginal and Torres Islander students, it provides an opportunity to see themselves within the curriculum and in an educational setting that respects and promotes their cultural identities. Students are taught that Australian Aboriginal societies are the longest surviving societies in the world and that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are two distinct groups. Students learn about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander occupation of the continent prior to colonisation by the British, and the ensuing contact and conflict between these societies. Students develop an awareness of the resilience of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the ways in which their expertise and experiences in contemporary science, education, the arts, sport and tourism; their inventions; and their knowledge of medicine have contributed to the development of a culturally diverse Australian society.

General capabilities and crosscurriculum priorities

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: gc_literacy description: description: description: gc_numeracydescription: description: gc_ictdescription: description: gc_criticaldescription: description: gc_personal_socialdescription: description: gc_ethicaldescription: description: gc_intercultural

description: cc_asia

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: gc_literacydescription: description: description: gc_numeracy description: description: gc_ictdescription: description: gc_criticaldescription: description: gc_personal_socialdescription: description: gc_ethicaldescription: description: gc_intercultural

description: cc_asia

Opportunities to engage with:

description: description: gc_literacy description: description: gc_numeracydescription: description: gc_ict description: description: gc_critical description: description: description: gc_personal_socialdescription: description: gc_ethicaldescription: description: gc_intercultural

description: cc_asiadescription: cc_sust




Key to general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities

description: description: description: gc_literacy Literacy  description: description: description: gc_numeracy Numeracy  description: description: description: gc_ict ICT capability  description: description: description: gc_critical Critical and creative thinking  description: description: description: gc_personal_social Personal and social capability  description: description: description: gc_ethical Ethical behaviour description: description: description: gc_intercultural Intercultural understanding

 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures  description: description: cc_asia Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia  description: description: cc_sust Sustainability




Develop assessment

Assessment

For advice and guidelines on assessment, see: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

The following assessment will provide a targeted selection of evidence of student learning across different assessment techniques and instruments. This evidence will be collected in a folio to make an overall on-balance judgment about student achievement and progress at appropriate points, and to inform the reporting process.

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Assessment

Assessment

Assessment

Supervised assessment: Responses to historical sources (Written)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ responses that are produced independently, under supervision and in a set time frame.

Students consider a range of sources about the impact of World War II on Australia, specifically:


  • its impact on the Australian home front, including the changing roles of women and use of wartime government controls

  • the significance of World War II to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century, with a particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia.

The student responses required will vary in length and require the interpretation, analysis and evaluation of historical sources, both seen and unseen.

Research: Assignment (Spoken/signed and written)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ abilities to research, collect, analyse and draw conclusions about historical sources.

Students complete a case study on the significance of one of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples:


  • 1962 right to vote federally

  • 1967 referendum

  • Land rights movement

  • Mabo decision

  • Bringing Them Home report (the Stolen Generations)

  • Reconciliation movement

  • 2008 Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples.

Students develop a hypothesis or position about the significance of one of these events or movements, develop a script with appropriate references and deliver a spoken/signed presentation.

Supervised assessment: Extended response to historical sources (Written)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ responses that are produced independently, under supervision and in a set time frame.

Students consider a range of sources about the post-1945 migration to Australia, including government policy and associated commentary, primary sources about migrants’ experiences and sources about the effects on Australian society.

Students write an extended response to historical sources that puts forward a point of view supported by the interpretation, analysis and evaluation of evidence. The historical sources will be both seen and unseen.



Make judgments and use feedback

Moderation

Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers cross-mark tasks to ensure consistency of judgments.



Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers calibrate A–E samples of student work that link to the standards before marking tasks. They moderate to ensure consistency of judgments.

Teachers select representative folios and meet to ensure consistency of judgments before marking tasks.


Teachers develop tasks and plan units.

Teachers calibrate A–E samples of student work that link to the standards before marking tasks. They moderate to ensure consistency of judgments.

Teachers select representative folios and meet to ensure consistency of judgments before marking tasks



Year 10 History: review for balance and coverage of content descriptions, including emphasis on historical understandings

Historical Knowledge and Understanding




Historical Skills

Historical Knowledge

1

2

3

Historical Understandings1

The key concepts of historical understanding are:



1

2

3




Historical Skills

1

2

3

The Modern World and Australia: Overview

Evidence

Information obtained from historical sources used to construct an explanation or narrative, to support a hypothesis, or prove or disprove a conclusion.












Chronology, terms and concepts

Overview content for the Modern World and Australia includes the following:










Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places (ACHHS182)








  • the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression









Continuity and change

Continuities are aspects of the past that have remained the same over certain periods of time. Changes are events or developments from the past that represent modifications, alterations and transformations.













Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS183)







Historical questions and research

  • continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping









Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform historical inquiry (ACHHS184)







  • the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies









Cause and effect

The relationship between a factor or set of factors (cause/s) and consequence/s (effect/s). These form sequences of events and developments over time.












Evaluate and enhance these questions (ACHHS185)







Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS186)







  • the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War







Perspectives

A point of view or position from which events are seen and understood, and influenced by age, gender, culture, social position and beliefs and values.












Analysis and use of sources

Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS187)







  • developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability









Empathy

An understanding of the past from the point of view of the participant/s, including an appreciation of the circumstances faced, and the motivations, values and attitudes behind actions.













Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument (ACHHS188)








World War II

Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS189)







An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)








Significance

The importance that is assigned to particular aspects of the past, such as events, developments, movements and historical sites, and includes an examination of the principles behind the selection of what should be investigated and remembered.












Perspectives and interpretations

Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190)







An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)









Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own) (ACHHS191)







The experiences of Australians during World War II (such as Prisoners of War (POWs), the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, the Fall of Singapore) (ACDSEH108)









Contestability

Debate about particular interpretations of the past as a result of the nature of available evidence and/or different perspectives.













Explanation and communication

Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use evidence from a range of sources that are referenced (ACHHS192)







The impact of World War II, with a particular emphasis on the Australian home front, including the changing roles of women and use of wartime government controls (conscription, manpower controls, rationing and censorship) (ACDSEH109)
























Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193)




















The significance of World War II to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century, with particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia (ACDSEH110)




































Rights and freedoms




























The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including Australia’s involvement in the development of the declaration (ACDSEH023)




































Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the Stolen Generations (ACDSEH104)




































The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia (ACDSEH105)




































The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: 1962 right to vote federally; 1967 Referendum; Reconciliation; Mabo decision; Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations), the Apology (ACDSEH106)




































Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle (ACDSEH134)




































The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world, such as the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) (ACDSEH143)




































The globalising world: Migration experiences

The waves of post-World War II migration to Australia, including the influence of significant world events (ACDSEH144)









The impact of changing government policies on Australia’s migration patterns, including abolition of the White Australia Policy, ‘Populate or Perish’ (ACDSEH145)









The impact of at least ONE world event or development and its significance for Australia, such as the Vietnam War and Indochinese refugees (ACDSEH146)









The contribution of migration to Australia’s changing identity as a nation and to its international relationships (ACDSEH147)









Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10

1 The historical understandings are derived from the content descriptions and achievement standards, and are supported by Historical Skills. The Year level description provides information about the development of historical understandings through the key concepts. The definitions of historical understandings are based on the glossary terms published in Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation-10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Curriculum/F-10.

Queensland Studies Authority October 2012 |


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