Wwii: Shaping the Modern World Applicable for use in Australian Curriculum: History wwii — Year 10



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WWII: Shaping the Modern World

Applicable for use in Australian Curriculum: History WWII — Year 10
Written by Chloe Tayler, Anna Fee and Tom Bleby

Pre-service teachers, the University of Melbourne, Victoria
This Unit has sixteen lessons taught over an eight-week period.

Table of Contents


Aims and Objectives 12

Course Overview 13

Resources List 30

Appendices 34

Appendix 1.1: 3,2,1 Worksheet 34

Appendix 1.2: The Treaty of Versailles – June 1919 35

Appendix 2.2: Timeline Activity – Hitler’s Rise To Power 38

Appendix 3.2: Primary Source Analysis – Nazi Propaganda 39

Appendix 4.1: KWHL Chart 39

Appendix 4.2: Historical Inquiry Instruction Sheet 41

Appendix 4.3: Learning Inquiry Rubric 42

Appendix 6.1: Primary Sources 43




Aims and Objectives


Emphasising Australia in the global context of the war, historical skills are paramount in investigating the context, events and enduring significance of WWII.
Knowledge and Understanding/Skills

Inquiry learning



  • Students will be able to engage in deep questioning of areas aligned with their own interests, prompted by historical stimuli.

Historical empathy

  • Students will be able to identify with key concepts of shared humanity, engaging with the deep trauma experienced by both Allied and Axis troops and civilians before, during, and after the war years.

  • Students will refer to source material to understand and explain historical decisions and actions.

Source analysis

  • Students will be able to use primary and secondary source material to substantiate historical thinking and form an historical argument and consolidate knowledge from the beginning to the end of the unit.


Links

Throughout the Unit there are clear links to the Australian Curriculum: History.



Course Overview


Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment

1

1

Introduction: Purpose and Significance of the Study of WWII

Inquiry Question: Prior Knowledge

  • What do we already know from WWI?


Learning Activities

  • 3,2,1 Worksheet interrogating student prior knowledge (see Appendix 1.1).

  • Students look through detailed interactive WWII timeline (see resources) and then map and discuss in relation to the answers they gave in the worksheet and in response to the key questions:

Is there anything that surprises you?

Does all your prior knowledge fit with this information?



  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)

  • Formative Assessment

  • 3,2,1 Worksheet (Appendix 1.1)

2

End of WWI: The Treaty of Versailles

Inquiry Question

  • What was the significance of the Treaty of Versailles?


Learning Activities

  • Students read and respond to excerpts from Versailles (see resources).

What are the key points from the treaty?

What position does the treaty put Germany in?

What is Germany’s reaction?

Why have they responded this way?



  • Simulation activity for historical imagination adopting significant historical roles (see Appendix 1.2).

  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)

  • Treaty of Versailles Instruction Sheet (Appendix 1.2)




Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment

2

3

The Interwar Period: Australia in the 1930s

Analysis: Australia in the 1930s

  • What can primary and secondary sources tell us about Australia in the interwar period?


Learning Activities

  • Students address various accounts and images of 1930s Australia, answering the following questions, considering the resources provided:

What is it?

Who created it?

What is their intention or purpose?

What are they saying about life in Australia in the 1930s?

Why would they have that perspective/opinion?

How reliable is this source?

Compare your findings with a group who have addressed another source. Are their answers different? How reliable is their source?


  • Consider the sources from the Roaring 20s that we looked at last lesson, and those from 1930s Australia and answer the following:

What are the key differences?

Are there significant differences in the experiences depicted in all sources?



Are there similarities?

  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)







Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment




4

Weimar Republic and Hitler’s Rise to Power

Inquiry Questions: Weimar Republic and Adolf Hitler

  • Why did the Weimar Republic collapse?

  • How did Adolf Hitler rise to power?


Learning Activities

  • Students research the reasons for the collapse of the Weimar Republic, sorting these answers into internal and external. Based on this research, students evaluate the collapse by writing a paragraph response to the question “What were the most significant factors in the collapse of the Weimar Republic?” (see resources for websites).

  • Using a PowerPoint, students are given an overview of Hitler’s early life and career (see resources for website).

  • Using the internet, students create a scaled and annotated timeline of Hitler’s rise to power (see Appendix 2.2).

  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)

  • Summative Assessment: Timeline Activity – Hitler’s Rise to Power

3

5

Life in Nazi Germany


Inquiry Questions: Life in Nazi Germany

  • What was life like in Nazi Germany?


Learning Activities

  • Watch Life in Hitler’s Germany, parts one and two (see resources)

  • Write a diary entry considering the perspective of either a visiting American, of a German living in the 1930s under the rule of Hitler and the Third Reich.

  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)







Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment




6

Life in Nazi Germany
Declaration of War 1939

Inquiry Questions: Life in Nazi Germany and Outbreak of War

  • What are some of the key ideas of the Nazis?

  • What events led to the outbreak of war?


Learning Activities

  • Using the recommended websites (see resources) and prior knowledge, create a concept map exploring the following key ideas and events:

Master Race and “Aryan”, Lebensraum (living space)

Concentration Camps

The 1936 Olympics

Anti-Semitism and Anti-Bolshevism



  • Source Analysis (Appendix 3.2)

Students complete source analysis handouts.

Consolidate understanding of propaganda and its use during Hitler’s rule.



  • Flowchart Activity

Create a flowchart of events leading to outbreak of war, using Neville Chamberlain’s 3rd September address for supporting information, and demonstrate cause and effect (see resources).


  • An overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)







Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment

4

7

The Australian Experience of WWII

Inquiry Question (For Assessment)

  • What were some of the Australian war experiences during WWII?


Learning Activities

Information provided by summaries of battles from Australian War Memorial Websites (see resources)

  • Developing inquiry questions

Scaffolded by KWHL Chart (Appendix 4.1)


  • The experiences of Australians during WWII such as POWs, the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, and the Fall of Singapore (ACDSEH108)

  • KWHL Chart (Appendix 4.1)

  • Instruction Sheet (Appendix 4.2)

  • Rubric (Appendix 4.3)


Assessment Details

  • Students pick a campaign to research: the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, or the Fall of Singapore. Independently researching, students frame their own inquiry question, such as: “In what ways was Australia’s identification as British compromised by the Fall of Singapore?” The inquiry question should then create several subheadings: such as “important individuals” and “turning points”.

  • Students are required to include an annotated bibliography, as well as footnoting their reports.

  • At Primary Sources and secondary Sources must be used, and need to be justified in an annotated bibliography.

  • Students have three full lessons to research and construct their formal inquiry reports.

8

The Australian Experience of WWII

Inquiry Question (For Assessment)

  • What were some of the Australian war experiences during WWII?


Learning Activities

  • Researching and continuing to construct formal inquiry report.

  • The experiences of Australians during WWII such as POWs, the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, and the Fall of Singapore (ACDSEH108)

  • Marking Rubric

Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment

5

9

The Australian Experience of WWII

Inquiry Question (For Assessment)

  • What were some of the Australian war experiences during WWII?


Learning Activities

  • Plenary

Students are required to share the most interesting detail they have learnt in their research to this point.

  • Report Writing

Reports Due at the end of this week.

  • The experiences of Australians during WWII such as POWs, the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, and the Fall of Singapore (ACDSEH108)

  • Assessment

10

Introduction to the Holocaust

Analysis: Art Spiegelman’s Maus

  • How can we construct narratives of the Holocaust?


Learning Activities

  • Reading excerpts of this graphic novel, considering imagery of the characters.

  • Individually students answer:

Who are the mice and who are the cats?

Why choose these animals to depict these figures?

Why would Art Spiegelman choose to express his story through a graphic novel?


  • An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)










Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment

6

11

Holocaust: Legislating Genocide

Inquiry Question: Persecution of the Jews

  • Why did the Nazi regime introduce anti-Semitic laws?


Learning Activities

Students are given cards (Holocaust Educational Trust) with anti-Jewish laws enacted between 1933 and 1945. In small groups, students organise the cards chronologically (see resources).

What do you notice about these laws as time progresses?

How do these laws relate to what was happening more widely in Germany and in the world?


  • In groups, select 2 or 3 of the laws, and discuss what you think the purpose and effect was.

How would this law have altered the life of a German Jew?

What insights might we gain into the Nazi Party from these laws?



  • Source Analysis: Anti-Jewish Propaganda

What is this source?

Why was it produced?

What can you see?

What is the message of the source?

How do you know?

Consider the Anti-Jewish laws we have looked at today. In what ways might the messages in these sources relate to the passing of Anti-Jewish laws in Germany?



  • An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)










Week

Lesson

Content/Activities

State/Territory and ACARA curriculum links

Assessment




12

The Final Solution

Inquiry Question: Persecution of the Jews (Sources)

  • Collecting and investigating sources: evidence, authorship and reliability.


Learning Activities

  • Students are assigned a topic in small groups (from the options of Nazi labour camps, Jewish resistance and the Final Solution) and provided a suggested list of resources, but encouraged to look outside these resources. Students investigate their topic in response to key prompts:

give an overview of your topic, including definition and key facts and dates

provide at least three primary and three secondary sources on your topic.



Key Questions

What sources have you found?

Are they primary or secondary?

How reliable are they and why?



  • Historiography

Look at your secondary sources, what do the different historians have to say?

What are their different perspectives?

Extension: Can you explain these differences in perspective?


  • An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)







7

13

Australia and Japan: War in the Pacific

Analysis: Curtin’s Speech, Japan Enters Second World War

  • How did Prime Minister John Curtin’s pivotal speech contribute to a shift in Australian war loyalties?


Learning Activities

  • List three significant factors of the speech.

  • Explain what the speech shows about Australia’s changing political alliances.

  • Identify the symbols that Curtin uses in his speech, and explain how they relate to Australia’s position in the war and more widely, commonwealth versus constitutional priorities.

  • The significance of WWII to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century with particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia (ACDSEH110)




14

Australian Leadership: John Curtin

Analysis: Deconstructing ABC’s Curtin

  • Investigating the contemporary representation of Australia’s leadership.


Learning Activities

  • Watching selected excerpts of Curtin, students consider the changing relationship of Australia to Britain (continued from previous lesson).

  • Padlet Discussion (see resources).

  • The significance of WWII to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century with particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia (ACDSEH110)




8

15

Truman’s Choice: Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Learning Activities

  • Scaffolded source enquiry and research.

  • Students independently collect and investigate primary and secondary sources available online (See resource week 8 for suggested sites), keeping in mind during their research the question: “Was the use of nuclear weapons justified?”

  • Scaffolded class debate

Class is split into 3 groups: affirmative, negative and judges.

Each group is provided the arguments worksheet to scaffold argument (see Appendix 8.1).


Inquiry Question

  • According to the sources you have investigated, was the use of nuclear weapons justified?

  • An examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)




  • Formative Assessment: Debate Participation and Interpersonal Communication

16

Home Front Perspectives: Women at War

Learning Activities

  • Women on the Home Front: Multiple Perspectives

Wins and losses for women during the war.

  • Students take the perspective of a woman working a factory job during the war or a factory owner employing women.

Discuss attitudes to women during wartime.

  • List problems with employing women for only the war years, and the effects it may have had for women when returning to the home.

  • The impact of WWII with a particular emphasis on the Australian home front including the changing roles of women and use of wartime government controls (conscription, manpower controls, rationing, and censorship) (ACDSEH109)

  • Formative Assessment: Higher Order Thinking – Prediction Skills for Post-War Home Front



Resources List


Week

Lesson

Resources

1

1

Introduction: Purpose and Significance of the Study of WWII

Websites

Timelines

www.datesandevents.org/events-timelines/16-timeline-of-ww2.htm

www.worldology.com/Europe/world_war_2_imap.htm

www.nationalww2museum.org/history/final/interactive_timeline.html


2

End of WWI: The Treaty of Versailles

Websites

Political Clauses for Europe

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7//wwi/versa/versa2.html

Military, Naval and Air Clauses

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7//wwi/versa/versa4.html

Reparations

http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7//wwi/versa/versa7.html

The German Reply

http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/GermanReply.pdf

Hitler’s Speech

http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/Hitlerspeech.pdf


2

3

The Interwar Period: Australia in the 1930s

Websites

1920s Advertising and Movie Posters

http://weburbanist.com/2010/06/15/1920s-vintage-ads-marketing-in-a-roaring-post-war-world/

Australian Women’s Weekly 1933

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/imageservice/nla.news-page4602692/print


5

Weimar Republic and Hitler’s Rise to Power

Websites

Websites to support student research

http://hsc.csu.edu.au.modern_history/national_studies/germany/2431/page76.htm

http://alphahistory.com/weimargermany/why-the-weimar-republic-failed

For students requiring extension

www.ssc.wisc.edu/~wright/Soc924-2011/924-2011-book-project/Abraham.pdf

Overview of Hitler’s Early Life

www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/hitler.html



3

5

Life in Nazi Germany

Websites

Life In Hitler’s Germany

Part 1: www.youtube.com/watch?v=UD0LGY9IMRM

Part 2: www.youtube.com/watch?v=KN0C6EgPv8o



6

Life in Nazi Germany
Declaration of War 1939

Websites

Summary of outbreak of war in 1939

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo

Britain Declares War on Germany (Radio Address), Neville Chamberlain. BBC

www.bbc.co.uk/archive/ww2outbreak/7917.shtml
Websites for student research

Master race and “Aryan”

www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/standard/history/germany_1918_1945/hitler_and_nazism/revision/1

Lebensraum (living space)

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/hitler_lebensraum_01.shtml

Concentration camps

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005144

The 1936 Olympic Games

www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/online-exhibitions/nazi-olympics-berlin-1936

Anti-Semitism

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/genocide/racial_state_01.shtml

Anti-bolshevism

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/nazi_propaganda_gallery_06.shtml


4

7

The Australian Experience of WWII

Websites

Battle for Singapore Summary

www.awm.gov.au/units/event_221.asp

Kokoda Summary

www.awm.gov.au/units/event_291.asp

Battle of Britain

www.awm.gov.au/encyclopedia/battle_of_britain





Week

Lesson

Resources




8

The Australian Experience of WWII

See Lesson 7 resources

5

9

The Australian Experience of WWII

See Lesson 7 resources

10

Introduction to the Holocaust

Books

Spiegelman, A. (1991). The Complete Maus. Pantheon, New York.



6

11

Holocaust: Legislating Genocide

Websites

Holocaust Educational Trust

Law cards

www.het.org.uk
Anti-Jewish Propaganda

Jews are our misfortune

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005274

The Eternal Jew

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005274&MediaId=1070

Jews are like lice

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007822


12

The Final Solution

Websites

www.ushmm.org

www.het.org.uk/index.php

www.holocaustresources.org

www.nizkor.org


7

13

Australia and Japan: War in the Pacific

Recordings

http://aso.gov.au/titles/radio/curtin-japan-second-world-war/clip1






Week

Lesson

Resources




14

Australian Leadership: John Curtin

Web Application

www.padlet.com


Videos

Curtin (2007). [DVD] Directed by Jessica Hobbs; Australian Broadcasting Company, Victoria.

8

15

Truman’s Choice: Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Websites

Atomic Bomb video

www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/bonus-video/presidents-endwar-truman

Warning urging Japan’s surrender

www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/truman-japanwarn

Warning leaflet dropped on Japan

www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/truman-leaflets

Potsdam Declaration

www.atomicarchive.com/Docs/Hiroshima/Potsdam.shtml

First Nuclear test in Mexico

www.pbs.org.wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/truman-bombtest

Announcing the bombing of Hiroshima

www.pbs.org.wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/truman-hiroshima

The voice of Hibakusha

www.atomicarchive.com/Docs/Hibakusha/index.shtml

Videos of Hiroshima

www.cddc.vt.edu/host/atomic/hiroshim/hirovid1.html

Photos of Hiroshima

www.atomicarchive.com/Photos/Hiroshima/index.shtml


16

Home front Perspectives: Women at War

Websites

Women’s Weekly Article

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/159408692?q&versionId=173763857

Cartoon


http://libraryhack.anotherbyte.net/pictures/view/164567


Appendices

Appendix 1.1: 3,2,1 Worksheet


Three things you know about WWII and where you learned them






Two questions you have about WWII






One reason you think we still study WWII




Appendix 1.2: The Treaty of Versailles – June 1919


The simulation:

  1. Students will meet first within their own delegations. They must establish in writing their demands from the other groups and they must write what they are willing to give up as a nation. They can write a rough draft called a “proposal” using a chart of “concessions” and “demands” on each side of the page.

  2. Students will then meet in the Hall of Mirrors. Each nation will present its demands and concessions. The teacher will summarise these on the board or overhead.

  3. Then distribute or display the sample treaty and have the delegations fill in blanks decided upon by the teacher. For each blank, have the delegations vote on the topic.

  4. Have students sign the treaty according to national delegations.



France


Your group is led by Georges Clemenceau, who was the prime minister of France. He was nicknamed “The Tiger”.
Most of the fighting took place on French soil. The French people lost 750,000 homes and more than 1,500,000 (one and a half million) men. The French wanted to punish Germany and make sure that Germany was too weak to fight another war. They also wanted to get the land back that Germany had taken from France 50 years earlier, and make sure that a war like this would never happen again.
Germany annexed a region called Alsace-Lorraine from France after its victory in the Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871). Should it be returned to France, or should Germany keep it?
The Rhineland is an area from which Germany can easily attack France. You are worried that if Germany is allowed to keep it as before, France will be in danger in the future. Should you try and stop Germany keeping an army there?
Germany must return Alsace-Lorraine to France, which had been annexed by Germany in 1871.
Germany must pay Reparations to cover the cost of rebuilding areas of France destroyed during the war (750,000 houses and 23,000 factories had been destroyed).
France should be allowed to take possession of the Rhineland (the area near the River Rhine). This was to stop Germany attacking France in the future.

United States of America


Your delegation is led by Woodrow Wilson, the president of the United State of America. The USA had only declared war on Germany in April 1917 and it had suffered no damage. Wilson arrived in Europe with the “Fourteen Points”, which he hoped would help prevent wars in the future. The most important of these were:

the peoples of Europe should be allowed to decide their own future (“Self-determination”)

an end to the empires, which European countries have built up

a League of Nations should be set up to settle disputes between countries in the future.


Should all countries be allowed to join, or should those at fault for WWI be stopped from joining?
You are worried that a German army may be the biggest danger to future world peace. You don’t want the treaty to be too harsh to them in case they are very angry, and seek revenge. Should you allow Germany to keep a full army, or order Germany to cut down drastically on all their armed forces?
You guess that Germany and Austria may want to join to become one country. They share the same language and culture. Do you allow them to join as one country or not?

Great Britain


David Lloyd George, who was the prime minister of Great Britain, leads your group. In Britain most people wanted Germany to be punished: “Make Germany Pay” and “Squeeze them until the pips squeak” were popular slogans. Lloyd George wants Germany to be punished but not too harshly.
Germany should be allowed to recover.

France should not be allowed to take the Rhineland. Lloyd George was only prepared to make the Rhineland “demilitarised”.


This is because you are worried that if Germany is too weak then communism (which you see as an enemy) might spread from Russia across the whole of Europe. This could lead to another terrible war. You also want to set up a group of countries that will work together to prevent any future wars.
Britain had a very large empire and navy. You think that the German Empire and its navy should be broken up, as they might be a threat to your own. The war had brought massive destruction, especially to buildings and farmland in France. How could all this damage be repaired?

German (Observers)


You are invited to observe the proceedings, and must sign the eventual Treaty on behalf of your country, but cannot take part in the decision-making. While you are observing, you are left to consider what the German people will think of the decisions being made.
During the war, Germany’s borders were never crossed, and you made many advances into France and Allied territory. Because of this, many German people think you did not lose the war, but just agreed to stop fighting. They think that you should not agree to anything that punishes you when you fought so well. Most Germans also expect the treaty to be lenient because of Woodrow Wilson’s 14 Points.
However, by the end of the war, the German Army Chief decided that the German army could not fight anymore. If the war had gone on, then the German army would have collapsed, as they were unhappy and running out of supplies. This is why you signed the armistice agreement.

It will be almost impossible to pay the Reparations required by the treaty, and the War Guilt Clause seemed particularly unfair. How could Germany be the only country to blame for the war? After all it had started when a Serbian shot an Austrian. It was felt that Germany had simply been made a scapegoat by the other countries for all that had happened.

The Allies also gave Germany a new form of government based on proportional representation. It was intended to prevent Germany being taken over by a dictatorship, but it led to the creation of more than thirty political parties; none of them was big enough to form a government on its own.
Germany must:

accept all of the blame for the war, the “War Guilt Clause”

reduce its army to 100,000 men and was not allowed to have conscription (drafting)

reduce its navy to six warships and was not allowed to have any submarines

destroy all of its air force.

Points For All


WWI cost 20 million lives. The world had never seen a war like it. How could future wars be prevented? Remember how the First World War started – you learnt the MAIN reasons (Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, Nationalism) and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Those people who have lost so much during the war are angry and want to blame and punish someone for the war. Do you think your country is to blame? Who do you think should be punished and how?

Appendix 2.2: Timeline Activity – Hitler’s Rise To Power


Using the internet, research the following points, and create a scaled timeline of Adolf Hitler’s rise to power in Germany. Provide an explanation of the points in bold. Include images on the timeline. Ensure all websites used are sourced appropriately.
Spartacist Uprising

Hitler joins the German Workers’ Party (DAP)

The DAP becomes the NSDAP (Nazi Party)



The Beer Hall Putsch

Hitler is imprisoned

Hitler’s trial starts

Hitler is convicted of treason

Hitler is released



Germany joins the League of Nations

The Wall Street Crash

Nazi Party becomes the largest in the Reichstag



Hitler is appointed Chancellor

The Reichstag building is set on fire

The Reichstag Fire Decree

The Enabling Act

Appendix 3.2: Primary Source Analysis – Nazi Propaganda


One People, One Nation, One Leader!” poster of Hitler, 1938

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/nazi_propaganda_gallery_03.shtml


  • How does this image portray Hitler? What physical elements of the image support this portrayal?

  • Imagining yourself as a German citizen at the time the source was produced, how would this poster make you feel?

  • What is the purpose of this poster? What message is it trying to give?

  • Who would have created such a poster? Who would their target audience have been?

  • Do you think this source is effective? Compare it to the other sources looked at this lesson. Which would have been most effective? Why?

  • How useful is this source as a piece of historical evidence?



The poster for the “Eternal Jews” exhibition,

1937

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/nazi_propaganda_gallery_05.shtml




  • How does this image portray Jews? What physical elements of the image support this portrayal?

  • Imagining yourself as a German citizen at the time the source was produced, how would this poster make you feel?

  • What is the purpose of this poster? What message is it trying to give?

  • Who would have created such a poster? Who would their target audience have been?

  • Do you think this source is effective? Compare it to the other sources looked at this lesson. Which would have been most effective? Why?

  • How useful is this source as a piece of historical evidence?



Anti-Bolshevik poster, “Europe’s Victory is Your Prosperity”, 1941

www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/nazi_propaganda_gallery_06.shtml




  • How does this image portray ideas of anti-Bolshevism? What physical elements of the image support this portrayal?

  • Imagining yourself as a German citizen at the time the source was produced, how would this poster make you feel?

  • What is the purpose of this poster? What message is it trying to give?

  • Who would have created such a poster? Who would their target audience have been?

  • Do you think this source is effective? Compare it to the other sources looked at this lesson. Which would have been most effective? Why?

  • How useful is this source as a piece of historical evidence?

Appendix 4.1: KWHL Chart


K

W

H

L

What do I know?

What do I want to learn?

How can I find out what I need to learn?

What have I learnt?









(We will revisit this at the end.)



Appendix 4.2: Historical Inquiry Instruction Sheet


Battling Australians

Task Instructions


Develop an Inquiry Question around one of these three battles of WWII:

Battle of Singapore

Battle of Britain

Kokoda.
Next, you are required to write a formal written report of 800 words based on the inquiry question. Complete the checklist to ensure you have included everything you need.



Example


How did the Battle of Singapore affect Australians on the home front?
Developed Inquiry Question

Divided into subheadings

Included primary sources

Included Secondary Sources



Annotated Bibliography

Appendix 4.3: Learning Inquiry Rubric


Battles of WWII: Australians at War Inquiry-Based Historical Report





Well above Standard

Above Standard

At the Standard

Below Standard

Well Below Standard

No Evidence

Inquiry Question and Subheadings

Inquiry questions and subheadings make links to each other and historical events.

Inquiry questions and subheadings form a sequence.

Question and subheadings are stated.

Inquiry question is stated, irrelevant to the topic.

Report is titled.

No Evidence.

Source Material

Primary and secondary sources evaluated within the report.

Primary and secondary sources justify content of the report.

Primary and secondary sources used to create a chronological account.

Primary and secondary sources used without reference to inquiry question.

Primary/secondary sources used to directly answer questions (i.e. copy and paste).

No Evidence.

Language

Formal structure, language and historical terminology synthesised throughout report.

Formal structure and language used throughout report.

Formal structure used throughout report.

Informal structure.

Informal structure and language.

No Evidence.

Annotated Bibliography

Primary and secondary sources, referenced, justified for use and critiqued.

Primary and secondary sources referenced and justified for use.

Primary and secondary sources referenced.

Primary and Secondary Sources included.

List of sources included.

No Evidence.



Appendix 6.1: Primary Sources











The Eternal Jew

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005274&MediaId=1070



Jews Are Like Lice

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007822



Jews Are Our Misfortune

www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005274




Appendix 8.1: The Bombing of Hiroshima

Evidence

Justification

Counter Argument

There were around 100,000 Allied prisoners of war being held by the Japanese.







In preparation for the invasion of Japan the American army had produced 500,000 purple heart medals (given to soldiers who are wounded or killed in action).







Every month between 1937 and the dropping of the bomb had seen between 100,000 and 200,000 Chinese killed by the Japanese.







The Americans had spent over $2 billion (equivalent to $25 billion today) developing nuclear weapons.







Japanese people believed it was dishonourable to surrender.







By the end of WWII Japan had around 10 million Chinese in forced labour camps.







American troops had been moving through the Pacific towards Japan island-by-island with huge losses.







Even after the surrender some Japanese military leaders tried to continue the fighting.










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