World History Semester Exam Study Guide



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World History - Semester Exam Study Guide
Disciplines in Social Studies; Themes in Geography and History
Researchers and Prehistory

Researchers of history

Historical equation

Geography importance


Prehistory

Prehistoric hominids (early humans)

Early religious beliefs

Old, Middle and New Stone Ages

Prehistoric beliefs

Neolithic revolution


Characteristics of civilization

Civilization origins

Importance of cities

Importance of agriculture and domestication of animals

Trade and assimilation

Changes of civilization



River Valley Civilizations
Fertile Crescent; chaotic society

Introduction of polytheistic and monotheistic

Ancient religious beliefs/perspectives

Sargon creates 1st empire; Lydians introduce coins; premeditation for crimes introduced by Persians

Code of Hammurabi

movement of people across the Fertile Crescent

Middle Eastern Peoples cultural influences
Old, Middle and New Kingdom

pyramids


Hieroglyphics

Pharaohs
Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro

reincarnation and veneration of the cow

Hinduism influences


"Middle Kingdom"; center of the universe

Mandate of Heaven and dynastic cycle

Chinese Dynasties

Qin Shi Huang Di

Buddha; achieve enlightenment

Confucius beliefs about society

Chinese cultural contributions

Religions/philosophies

Hinduism


Judaism

Buddhism


Christianity

Islam


Naturalism

Confucianism

Daoism

Legalism


Greek/Roman

focus of classical civilization

geography of Greece

geographic characteristics of Greece; link to the outside world

Homer

respected occupation



entertainment importance - theater, olympics, coliseum

Greek theater

Classical art/architecture

Alexander’s most lasting achievement

cultures contributed to the Hellenistic civilization
fields of art and literature, cultural influences

Roman legal system

Greed, corruption, scandal influence

Rome’s attitude toward people of different religions

Christianity

Fall of Rome


Middle Ages

Roman Empire split and collapse

Roman province of Gaul

violence, chaos, “fend for yourself”

self-sufficiency

Battle of Tours


government, education, Christianity and violence

Charlemagne contributions

jealousy and rivalry

feudalism

manor system

three-field system

New agricultural technologies - impact

castles


Vikings

Church


Church influence/power over people

monks and nuns

Cluniac reforms against the Church

canon law


towns

economic emphasis and merchant guilds

vernacular

chivalry

common law

markets and trade fairs

Magna Carta – goal/impact

Crusades - impact

bubonic and pneumonic

Renaissance

Renaissance focus – humanism, Petrarch, patrons

status quo and carpe diem

Florence, Italy

Italian and Northern Renaissance

Everyone effected

Arts, literature, religion, science, exploration and commercial

Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Durer

Machiavelli and Shakespeare

Gutenburg and printing press impact

Luther and indulgences, Luther belief for salvation, Inquisition consequences

Galileo, Newton, Decartes and Copernicus

Dutch/Jews

Columbus, exploration goals, Columbian exchange and influence, assimilation

most important element of African trade

Native American influence on Europeans


Age of Reason definition/goal

Montesquieu – separation of powers to protect human liberties


Written Response

  • What was the most important technological advancement that early man created and how was it used to guarantee survival? Explain.

  • How was trade important toward the development of the River Valley Civilizations? Explain with supporting details.

  • Identify an important contribution from either classical civilization, Greek or Roman, and explain how it has influenced modern society.

  • Explain how the “spirit” of the renaissance is still alive in today’s society using two (2) specific examples.

  • Describe why the concept of assimilation is important to understanding World History? Explain using three (3) examples.


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