World History Scope and Sequence 2nd six weeks



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World History

Scope and Sequence

2nd six weeks




TEKS#

Strand & TEKS/SE statement

The student is expected to…


Pacing

Clarifying statements/questions

The student will…


Vocabulary

Resources & Activities

Differentiation




1A. identify the major eras in world history and describe their defining

Characteristics such as classical civilizations

2A. identify elements in a contemporary situation that parallel a historical

situation

6B. summarize the major political, economic, and cultural developments of

civilizations in Mesoamerica and Andean South America

6C. summarize the major political, economic, and cultural developments of

civilizations in China, India, and Japan such as the major Chinese dynasties, early technological developments in China and India

7A. analyze examples of major empires of the world such as the Aztec; concept of “Empire”

12A. locate places and regions of historical significance and describe their

physical and human characteristics

12B. analyze the effects of physical and human geographic factors on major

events in world history.

15B. define and give examples of different political systems, past and present

16A. trace the process by which democratic-republican government evolved form

its beginnings in classical Greece and Rome, through developments in England,

and continuing with the Enlightenment

16B. Identify the impact of political and legal ideas contained in significant

historic documents. such as Justinian’s Code of Laws

17A. evaluate political choices and decisions that individuals, groups, and nations

have made in the past, taking into account historical context, and apply this

knowledge to the analysis of choices and decisions faced by contemporary

societies

17B. describe the different roles of citizens and noncitizens in historical cultures,

especially as the roles pertain to civic participation

18A. trace the historical development of the rule of law and rights and

responsibilities, beginning in the ancient world and continuing to the beginning of

the first modern constitutional republics.

18B. summarize the worldwide influence of ideas concerning the rights and

responsibilities that originated from Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian ideals in

Western civilization. such as equality before the law; patriarchal societies; universal literacy

18C. identify examples of political, economic, and social oppression and violations

of human rights throughout history including slavery…

19A. compare the historical origins, central ideas, and the spread of major

religious and philosophical traditions including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism,

Zoroastrianism, Coptic Christianity

19B. identify examples of religious influence in historic and contemporary world

events.


20A. identify significant examples of art and architecture that demonstrate an

artistic ideal or visual principle form selected cultures

20B. analyze examples of how art, architecture, literature, music, and drama

reflect the history of cultures in which they are produced.

20C. identify examples of art, music, and literature that transcend the cultures in

which they were created and convey universal themes.

21A. analyze the specific roles of women, children, and families in different

historical cultures

22A. summarize the fundamental ideas and institutions of Eastern civilizations

that originated in China and India

22B. summarize the fundamental ideas and institutions of Western civilization

that originated in Greece and Rome

23A. give examples of major mathematical and scientific discoveries and

technological innovations that occurred at different periods in history and

describe the changes produced by these discoveries and innovations.

23B. identify new ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred

during the Greco-Roman, Indian, Islamic, and Chinese civilizations and trace the

spread of these ideas to other civilizations

23C. summarize the ideas in astronomy, mathematics, and architectural

engineering that developed in Mesoamerica and Andean South America

23E. identify the contributions of significant scientists such as Archimedes, Eratosthenes, and Pythagoras

25C. analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-andeffect

relationships (or precipitating conditions), comparing, contrasting, finding

the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing

inferences and conclusions, and finding correlations.

25D. explain and apply different methods that historians use to interpret the past. Including the use of primary and secondary sources, points of view,

frames of references, and historical context

26B. use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, and

syntax, including appropriate use of passive and active voices

26B1. Recognize and use appropriately the four modes of historical discourse:

narrative, exposition, descriptive, and explanation

26B2. Recognize commonly used command terms when they encounter them in

academic prompts, and employ the appropriate mode of discourse in responding

to the prompt

26B3. develop and write to (prove) an arguable thesis;

26D1. Develop and present multimedia and written presentations individually

and in groups using appropriate methods of time management and project

management

Including documentation of the research process





To what extent were the civilizations of Greece and Rome a product of their geography?
Why was the city-state the “cradle of democracy?”
Was citizenship in Ancient Greece and the Roman Republic like citizenship in the United States today?
Did the burdens of empire help or hinder the cause of democracy in Rome?
To what extent did trade allow interaction and cultural diffusion among the civilizations of Greece, Rome, Africa, India, China and Mesoamerica?


Mycenaean Julius Caesar

Dorian absolute ruler

Homer triumvirate

Polis Augustus

Acropolis Pax Romana

Monarchy Jesus

Aristocracy apostle

Oligarchy Diaspora

Tyrant Constantine

Democracy Diocletian’s reforms

Persian Wars Constantinople

Direct democracy Mauryan Empire

Peloponnesian War patriarchal / matriarchal

Philosophers Buddhism

Phillip II Hinduism

Alexander the Great Silk Roads

Darius III Han Dynasty

Hellenistic centralized government

Alexandria civil service

Republic clan

Patrician animism

Plebian Nok

Tribune Aksum

Consul Bantu-speaking peoples

Senate Beringia

Dictator Mesoamerica

Hannibal Olmec / Chavin


http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/india/indiasbook.html

www.classzone.com

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/eastasia/eastasiasbook.html

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/africa/africasbook.html

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/global/globalsbook.html

http://www.thecore.nus.edu/landow/post/india/indiaov.html



http://depts.washington.edu/chinaciv/timeline.htm

Maps to define locations of civilization, areas of interaction (trade or battle), spread of religions and cultures

Time Lines to juxtapose the rise and fall of civilizations in Asia, Africa, and Mesoamerica
Primary Reading Sources e.g. read from The History of Herodotus and Plague in Athens and compare the style of both looking for elements such as objectivity and

factual representation of events – how do they compare to what is portrayed in the text.








1D. explain the significance of the following dates: 1066, 1215.

3A. compare medieval Europe with previous civilizations.

3B. describe the major characteristics of the political system of feudalism, the

economic system of manorialism and the authority exerted by the Roman

Catholic Church

3C. identify the political, economic, and social impact of the Crusades.

6A. summarize the major political and cultural developments of the civilizations

of sub-Saharan Africa including the gold-salt empires, the Bantu migration

6C. summarize the major political, economic, and cultural developments of

civilizations in China, India, and Japan such as the major Chinese dynasties, early technological developments in

China and India, the voyages of Zheng-He

7A. analyze examples of major empires of the world

11A. create thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases representing

various aspects of world history

11B. pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns in

world history shown on maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases.

15B. define and give examples of different political systems, past and present:

16B. identify the impact of political and legal ideas contained in significant

historic doc uments. such as the Magna Carta

18A. trace the historical development of the rule of law and rights and

responsibilities, beginning in the ancient world and continuing to the beginning of

the first modern constitutional republics.

19A. compare the historical origins, central ideas, and the spread of major

religious and philosophical traditions

19B. identify examples of religious influence in historic and contemporary world

events.


20A. identify significant examples of ar t and architecture that demonstrate an

artistic ideal or visual principle from selected cultures.

22A. summarize the fundamental ideas and institutions of Eastern civilizations

that originated in China and India;

23B. identify new ideas in mathematics, science, and technology that occurred

during the Greco-Roman, Indian, Islamic, and Chinese civilizations and trace the

spread of these ideas to other civilizations.

SKILLS


25B. locate and use primary and secondary sources to acquire information

25C. analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect

relationships (or precipitating conditions), comparing, contrasting, finding the main

idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and

conclusions, and finding correlations.

25F. evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other

sources, and information about the author;

25H. support a point of view on a social studies issue or event

26C. interpret and create databases, research outlines, bibliographies, and visuals

including graphs, tables, flowcharts, charts, timelines, and maps.






Did Rome fall or was it pushed?
How did feudalism emerge from the ashes of the Western Roman Empire?
Explain the similarities in format and function of feudalism in Europe and Japan.
Analyze the spread of Christianity from Rome to Russia. How did it change, remain the same?
Explain the rise of Islam and it’s diffusion throughout the Middle East and Africa.


Allah Middle Ages

Muhammad Franks

Islam secular

Muslim Carolingian Dynasty

Hijrah Charlemagne

Qur’ran sacrament

Mosque canon law

Hajj Holy Roman Empire

Sunna lay investiture

Sharii’a Gothic

Shi’a Crusade

Sunni Saladin

House of Wisdom Richard the Lionhearted

Justinian Code Reconquista

Icon/iconoclast Inquisition

Patriarch three-field system

Schism guild

Slavs vernacular

Czar Thomas Aquinas

Mamalukes scholastics

Seljuks William the Conqueror

Pastoralist Henry the VII

Genghis Khan Magna Carta

Kublai Khan parliament

Marco Polo Great Schism

Shinto bubonic plague

Samurai Jan Hus

Bushido The Hundred Years’ War

Shogun Joan of Arc

Angkor Wat lineage

stateless societies Songhai

Ghana Benin

Mali Swahili

Ibn Battuta Great Zimbabwe




www.classzone.com

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/multimedia_zone/

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/islam/islamsbook.html

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/eastasia/eastasiasbook.html
Maps: Empire of Charlemagne, Trade and Manufacturing in Europe and the Byzantine Empire

Primary Source Readings: from the Qur’an, Secret History, Pope Urban II’s Call for a Crusade, Marco Polo at the Mongol Court,



A Samurai Instructs His Son, The Duties of Lords and Vassels, Letters of Gregory VII and Henry IV, Massacre at Acre,

Plague in Siena, from the Magna Carta,


Enrichment Activity Suggestions -

“ The Travels of Ibn Batuta” Students research travels of Ibn Batuta and choose one of the following ways to report on his journey: a journal / diary, an

illustrated and annotated map, letters from each of the countries he visited. After preparing report, students should prepare an oral report to present to the class.

time limits and index cards can be used to make the reports more cohesive and to prevent the entire report being read. A peer evaluation sheet is an effective

feedback tool.

Medieval Game – Students work with group members or alone to create a game centered around a facet of the Middle Ages. Grade is based on accuracy of detail,

theme, and quality of product.

Write and illustrate a story that could have been found in The Arabian Nights. Use accurate geographic settings and elements of the culture, politics, and religion of

the region and time period.

Create a 3 way venn diagram comparing and contrasting the law codes of Hammurabi, Justinian, and the Magna Carta.







Page of Cameron ISD

Revised 05/04/16




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