World History Pacing Guide 2013-2014



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World History Pacing Guide 2013-2014

Unit 1: Historical Skills & River Civilizations

(August 27- September 13)



Unit 2: Ancient Empires
(September 16- 27)

Unit 3: The Middle Ages
(October 1-October 11)

Unit 4: Age of Exploration
(October 14-28)

Unit5: Age of Revolutions
(October29-November 15)

Unit 6: World Wars
(November 18-(December 6)

Unit: 7 Post WWII

(December 9-January 3)



Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

Priority

Standards

WH.1.1

WH.1.2


WH.1.3

WH.1.4


WH.2.1

WH.2.2


WH.2.3

WH.2.7


WH.2.8

WH 2.2

WH 2.3


WH 2.4

WH 2.5


WH 2.6

WH 2.7


WH 2.8

WH 2.9


WH 2.4

WH 2.5


WH 2.6

WH 3.1


WH 3.2

WH 3.2


WH 3.4

WH 4.3



WH 3.1

WH 4.1


WH 4.2

WH 4.3


WH 4.4

WH 5.1


WH 5.2

WH 5.3


WH 5.4

WH 6.1


WH 6.1

WH 6.2


WH 6.3

WH 6.4


WH 4.4

WH 6.2


WH 7.1

WH 7.2


WH 7.3

WH 7.4


WH 7.5

WH 7.6


WH 8.1

WH 8.2


WH 8.3

WH 8.4


WH 8.5

WH 8.6


WH 8.7

Teachers are encouraged to guide students in drawing parallels between contemporary issues and their historical origins.

Buffer/Common Exam Review (January 6-January 10)



Unit 4:

Age of Exploration

North Carolina Essential Standards:

*WH.H.1, WH.H.2



Clarifying Objectives:

WH.1.1, WH.1.2, WH.1.3, WH.1.4, WH 3.1, WH 4.1,

WH 4.2, WH 4.3, WH 4.4, WH 5.1, WH 5.2, WH 5.3, WH 5.4,WH 6.1


Time Frame:

Time Frame: (14 days)

October 14-28



WH.H.1

Apply the four interconnected dimensions of historical thinking to the United States History Essential Standards in order to understand the creation and development of the United States over time.

*(Essential Standard WH.H.1 and its clarifying objectives are embedded and taught throughout each unit.)
WH.H.3

Understand how conflict and innovation influenced political, religious, economic and social changes in medieval civilizations.



WH.H.4

Analyze the political, economic, social and cultural factors that lead to the development of the first age of global interaction



WH.H.5

Analyze exploration and expansion in terms of its motivations and impact.



WH.H.6

Understand the Age of Revolutions and Rebellions.












Unpacking (What students need to understand). These can be used to write your enduring understandings.
WH1.H.1

  • Chronological thinking is the foundation of historical reasoning—the ability to examine relationships among historical events and to explain historical causality.


WH.H.1.2

  • Historical passages are primary sources that provide first-hand testimony or direct evidence concerning a topic under investigation.

  • Historical narratives are researched stories or accounts that describe or interpret historical events.

  • Comprehending a historical passage requires that it be read to reveal the humanity of the individuals and groups who lived in the past. What, for example, were their motives and intentions, their values and ideas, their hopes, doubts, fears, strengths, and weaknesses?

  • Comprehending a historical passage or narrative requires the appreciation for and the development of historical perspective—judging the past in consideration of the historical context in which the events unfolded and not solely in terms of personal and/or contemporary norms and values. How then did the social, political, cultural, or economic world of certain individuals and groups possibly influence their motives and intentions, their values and ideas, their hopes, doubts, fears, strengths, and weaknesses?



WH.H.1.3

  • Historical analysis involves more than a single source. Such an analysis would involve a rich variety of historical documents and artifacts that present alternative voices, accounts, and interpretations or perspectives on the past.

  • The study of history is subject to an individual’s interpretation of past events, issues, and problems. There is usually no one right answer, one essential fact, or one authoritative interpretation that can be used to explain the past. Historians may differ on the facts they incorporate in the development of their narratives and disagree as well on how those facts are to be interpreted. Thus, written history is a “dialogue” among historians, not only about what happened but about the historical interpretation of why and how events unfolded.

  • Historical issues are frequently value-laden and subsequently create opportunities to consider the moral convictions that possibly contributed to those actions taken by individuals and groups in the past.

  • The past inevitably has a degree of relevance to one’s own times.



WH.H.1.4

  • Historical inquiry, the research or investigation of past events, often begins with a historical question. Historical questions typically address “how” and/or “why” past decisions were made, past actions were taken, or past events occurred.

  • Historical inquiry, the research or investigation of past events, requires the acquisition and analysis of historical data and documents beyond the classroom textbook.

  • Historical inquiry, the research or investigation of past events, will allow them to analyze preexisting interpretations, to raise new questions about an historical event, to investigate the perspectives of those whose voices do not appear in the textbook accounts, or to investigate an issue that the textbook largely or in part bypassed.


WH.H.3.1



  • Religious beliefs and practices allow for the development of cultural institutions that often unite people and groups.

  • Religious decisions and actions may result in both intended and unintended consequences that can impact a group or nation’s power in a region.

  • Religion can be a unifying force both politically and culturally.

  • Absolute power can evolve when leaders have complete authority in religious and political matters.


WH.H.4.1


  • An increase in the quest for knowledge can lead to global interactions.

  • Intellectual and religious movements can transform societies and influence relationships among nations


WH.H.4.2


  • The search for national identity can lead to the development of nation-states.

  • An increase in political conflict can lead to changes in government.

  • Discontent with economic, political, and social conditions can be the impetus for change which can result in revolution or reform that may alter physical boundaries and government systems.


WH.H.4.3


  • Economies progress with improvements in agriculture and technology.

  • A consequence of technological innovation is expanding economic activity and new markets which can result in massive population increases, urbanization, and the development of new economic systems.

  • Agricultural advances promote growth in populations, urbanization and industrialization.

  • The quality of life may be changed as a result of a shift in economic stability


WH.H.4.4


  • Mercantilism prompted the colonization of the Americas.

  • Trade competition among European nations fueled economic growth.

  • Exploration fueled the global economy and led to global interaction.

  • How and why the desire to spread Christianity, acquire economic wealth and achieve social or political notoriety were reasons individuals, groups and governments participated in or financed exploration of the western hemisphere and the far east.

  • How and why powerful nations benefited from the acquisition of colonial possessions.

  • How and why the desire for a trade route that bypassed the Mediterranean, providing direct access to Asia influenced European exploration.

  • How and why the desire to crusade against the Muslims was a reason for European exploration.

  • How and why the Crusades became one of the many reasons for European exploration.

  • The major economic, political and cultural features of European society that stimulated exploration and conquest in the Asia, the Americas and Africa.

  • Factors influencing the founding of the Mongol Empire by Genghis Khan.

  • Epidemics or outbreak of disease spread disastrous economic, political and social consequences across the places and regions impacted.

For example: The “Black Death” and how and why it spread both death and social unrest

throughout Western Europe.


WH.H.5.1


  • The methods of and motivations for exploration and conquest can result in increased global interactions, differing patterns of trade, colonization, and conflict among nations.

  • The desire for resources and markets can be catalysts for exploration and may lead to increased global interaction, economic competition and additional colonial possessions.

  • Movement and interaction of people and ideas affects all societies involved.

  • Imperialism and colonization prompts political, military and economic conflict among and between people and groups while initiating global interactions that can result in the development of new systems.

  • The desire for economic advantage and the migration of people causes drastic changes in how, why and where people settle.

WH.H.5.2

  • Explorers, reflecting different cultures and religions often seek to imprint their identities on settlements.

  • The conquest of nations or regions often creates a shift in the balance of economic and political power.

  • Changes in society are catalysts for new opportunities in exploration and invention; likewise, exploration and invention stimulate change in society.


WH.H.5.3

  • Colonization is inspired by the desire to have access to resources and markets often at the expense of indigenous cultures, populations, and the environment.

  • The need for resources and markets promotes expansion and contributes to social chaos and some degree of economic and political conflict.

  • A nation’s acquisition of new colonies increases its wealth by guaranteeing control of resources for trade, raw materials for developing industry and markets for their manufactured products.

  • The impacts of colonialism are often overwhelmingly negative and infrastructure is generally provided to enable the colonial power to be able to exploit the natural resources and workforce of the colony.

WH.H.5.4

  • Exploration occurs because of the desire for wealth which motivates people and nations to take financial risks in exploring unknown territory.

  • Economic revolutions instigate global trade, promote new business methods and increase competition for profits.

  • Mercantilism stimulates expansion through trade, conquest and colonization.

WH.H.6.1

  • New ideas, theories and political thought help engineer foundations for changes in government, economies and societies.

  • Discontent with prevailing economic, political, and social conditions is often the impetus for change which can result in revolution or reform.






Unpacking Historical Understanding

Unpacked” Concepts (What students need to know)

Unpacked” Skills (What students must be able to do)

WH.H.1.1 Use Chronological thinking to:

  1. Identify the structure of a historical narrative or story: (its beginning, middle and end)

  2. Interpret data presented in time lines and create time lines



WH.H.1.1

  • Deconstruct the temporal structure of various types of historical narratives or stories. Thus, students will be able to think forward from the beginning of an event, problem, or issue through its development, and anticipate some outcome; or to work backward from some issue, problem, or event in order to explain its origins or development over time.

  • Interpret data presented in time lines in order to identify patterns of historical succession (change) and historical duration (continuity).

  • Create time lines to record events according to the temporal order in which they occurred and to reconstruct patterns of historical succession and duration.




WH.H.1.2 Use Historical Comprehension to:

  1. Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage

  2. Differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretation

  3. Analyze data in historical maps

  4. Analyze visual, literary and musical sources




WH.H.1.2

  • Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed.

  • Differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations but acknowledge that the two are related; that the facts the historian reports are selected and reflect therefore the historian's judgment of what is most significant about the past.

  • Analyze historical data and sources beyond written passages or narratives in order to clarify, illustrate or elaborate on data presented in historical passages or narratives. This data includes historical maps.

  • Analyze historical data and sources beyond written passages or narratives in order to clarify, illustrate or elaborate on data presented in historical passages or narratives. This data includes, but is not limited to, visual, mathematical, and quantitative data presented in a variety of graphic organizers, photographs, political cartoons, paintings, music and architecture.



WH.H.1.3 Use Historical Analysis and Interpretation to:

  1. Identify issues and problems in the past

  2. Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past

  3. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation.

  4. Evaluate competing historical narratives and debates among historians.

  5. Evaluate the influence of the past on contemporary issues.




WH.H.1.3

  • Identify issues and problems in the past and analyze the interests, values, perspectives, and points of view of those involved in the situation. Consequently, the student will be able to use criteria to judge the past in consideration of the historical context in which the events unfolded and not solely in terms of personal and/or contemporary norms and values.

  • Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating their differing motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears.

  • Analyze past events in terms of cause and effect relationships. The student will be able to consider multiple causes of past events by demonstrating the importance of the individual in history; the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs; and the role of chance, the accidental and the irrational.

  • Use specific criteria to critique competing historical interpretations of past events in order to differentiate between expressions of opinion and informed hypotheses grounded in historical evidence.

  • Use specific criteria to judge the relevance of the past to contemporary events and their own lives through a variety of classroom settings such as debates, simulations, and seminars.




WH.H.1.4 Use Historical Research to:

  1. Formulate historical questions

  2. Obtain historical data from a variety of sources

  3. Support interpretations with historical evidence

  • Construct analytical essays using historical evidence to support arguments.



WH.H.1.4

  • Formulate historical questions by deconstructing a variety of sources, such as historical narratives and passages, including eyewitness accounts, letters, diaries, artifacts, photos, historical sites, art, architecture, and other records from the past.

  • Collect historical data from a variety of sources, to help answer historical questions. These sources include library and museum collections, historic sites, historical photos, journals, diaries, eyewitness accounts, newspapers, and the like; documentary films, oral testimony from living witnesses, censuses, tax records, city directories, statistical compilations, and economic indicators.

  • Interpret historical data, construct reasoned arguments and draw conclusions using historical evidence collected from a variety of sources.

  • Create analytical essays that demonstrate historical interpretations, analysis, conclusions, and supporting evidence from a variety of sources.






Clarifying Objective

Unpacked” Concepts (What students need to know)

Unpacked” Skills (What students must be able to do)

WH.H.3.1

Explain how religion influenced political power and cultural unity in various regions of the Europe, Asia and Africa (e.g., Carolingian Dynasty, Holy Roman Empire, Ottoman Empire, Mughal Empire, Safavid Empire).




WH.H.3.1


  • The meaning of the term Medieval.

  • The characteristics of the Early Middle Ages, Middle Ages, and High Middle Ages.

  • The political significance of Europe being largely cut off from advanced civilizations in the Middle East, China and India.

  • How and why a new European civilization emerged that blended Greco-Roman, Germanic and Christian traditions.

  • The reasons why Holy Roman emperors failed to build a unified state in Germany.

  • The reasons for the emergence of “feudalism” and the development of the manor economy and political system.

  • Christianity was a unifying force culturally, politically and militarily in the European empires.

  • That medieval popes enjoyed powerful positions of absolute authority during the middle ages.

  • How the role of religion was used to unify and centrally govern expanding territories with diverse populations of Europe.



.

WH.H.4.1

Explain how interest in classical learning and religious reform contributed to increased global interaction (e.g., Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, Catholic Reformation, Printing revolution, etc.).




WH.H.4.1


  • How and why innovations from Asian and Islamic civilizations, as well as from ancient Greek and Roman culture, laid the foundation for the Renaissance.

  • How and why increased availability of print material increased literacy and resulted in the spread of ideas that both supported and challenged authority.

  • The factors that led to the Renaissance and the impact it had on the arts.

  • The factors that led to the Reformation and the impact it had on European politics.

  • The reasons why classical knowledge becomes the foundation for cultural growth.

  • That the geographic location of Italian city-states played a significant role in the fact that Italy was the center of the Renaissance.

  • How and why the Reformation led to religious reforms.

  • That the printing revolution is a catalyst for the Reformation.

  • How the Protestant Reformation affected the development of Northern and Southern European society.







WH.H.4.2

Explain the political, social and economic reasons for the rise of powerful centralized nation-states and empires (e.g., Reformation, absolutism, limited monarchy, empires, etc.).





WH.H.4.2


  • That with the rise of national monarchies two themes dominate the political life of the High Middle Ages: 1) the successful development of national monarchies in England and France, with medieval England laying the foundations for a parliamentary monarchy and France establishing the basis for absolutism; 2) the failure to develop national monarchies in Germany and Italy.

  • The ways in which both the Protestant and Catholic reformations brought sweeping changes to Europe.

  • Why the idea of a nation-state is associated with the rise of the modern system of states (i.e., Westphalian system in reference to the Treaty of Westphalia).

  • The reasons for and the consequences of the rise of powerful, centralized nation-states in Europe (e.g., the French absolute monarchy and the English limited monarchy).

  • Why the Glorious Revolution and the creation of the English Bill of Rights were important contributors to eventual limits on British monarchy.

  • How and why the English Civil War led to the downfall of absolutism in England.

  • Characteristics that show how Louis XIV personified the ideals of absolutism.

  • The significance of absolute monarchs (e.g., Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Louis XIV, etc.).

  • The significance of the division of European regions into those that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant.







WH.H.4.3

Explain how agricultural and technological improvements transformed daily life socially and economically (e.g., growth of towns, creation of guilds, feudalism and the manorial system, commercialization, etc.).




WH.H.4.3


  • That there are significant relationships between the “agricultural revolution,” population growth, industrialization, specialization of labor, and patterns of land-holding that encourage growth of towns, creation of guilds and unions and changes in the feudal and manorial systems.

  • Better diets increased the average life span of people as a result of agricultural advancements.

  • Technological improvements made agricultural advancements possible.

  • How and why the impact of the printing press and other technologies helped to disseminate beliefs and ideas as well as improve communication.

  • How and why scientific and technological changes, transportation and new forms of energy brought about social, economic and cultural changes across Europe.







WH.H.4.4

Analyze the effects of increased global trade on the interactions between nations in Europe, Southwest Asia, the Americas and Africa (e.g., exploration, mercantilism, inflation, rise of capitalism, etc.).




WH.H.4.4

  1. Religion and economics shapes an empire’s social hierarchy and as a result the lives of various groups of people.

  2. Slavery changes as contact among cultures increases and societies become more sophisticated.

  3. The hierarchal structure of society influences the development of civilizations.

  4. Social class and caste systems compartmentalize and limit diversity within society.







WH.H.5.1

Explain how and why the motivations for exploration and conquest resulted in increased global interactions, differing patterns of trade, colonization, and conflict among nations (e.g., religious and political motives, adventure, economic investment, Columbian exchange, commercial revolution, conquistador destruction of Aztec and Incan civilizations, Triangular Trade, Middle Passage, trading outposts, plantation colonies, rise of capitalism, etc.).




WH.H.5.1


  • How and why the recovery of the late Middle Ages set the stage for changes during the Age of Discovery.

  • The major technological innovations that were made by the Portuguese and Spanish in shipbuilding, navigation and naval warfare and that those innovations had a direct affect on the confidence explorers had in expanding their travel beyond traditional routes.

  • The economic and geopolitical causes that lead groups and nations to seek expansion

  • That the voyages for exploration marked the beginning of European domination of the globe and these voyages helped Europe emerged as a powerful new force in the world in the 16th and 17th centuries.

  • Factors such as the Scientific Revolution, the search for a sea route to Asia, the arrival of Columbus and other Europeans to the Americas helped create the Columbian Exchange.

  • The migration of Europeans to the Americas and the exchange of ideas and culture between the Europeans and the Native Americans as well as the death of millions of Native Americans and the trans-Atlantic slave trade are effects of the Columbian Exchange.

  • How and why colonization prompted conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.

  • How and why the movement of people (ingenious Americans, European, African) into, from and within the Americas and Africa resulted in conflict between the New World and European nations.

  • The African slave trade and resulting migration caused a shift in societal settlement patterns in Africa, European societies and the Americas.






WH.H.5.2

Explain the causes and effects of exploration and expansion (e.g., technological innovations and advances, forces that allowed the acquisition of colonial possessions and trading privileges in Africa, Asia, the Americas and the Colombian exchange).




WH.H.5.2


  • The major technological innovations that were made by the Portuguese and Spanish in shipbuilding, navigation and naval warfare and that those innovations had a direct affect on the confidence explorers had in expanding their travel beyond traditional routes.

  • That various technologies, (e.g., printing, the marine compass, cannonry, Arabic numerals) derived from Europe’s interactions with Islam and Asia provided the necessary tools for European exploration and conquest.

  • The various economic and geopolitical causes that lead groups and nations to seek expansion

  • How and why colonization occurred and impacted both European and American civilizations.

  • The balance of power within Africa changes due to European exploration.

  • That the voyages for exploration marked the beginning of European domination of the globe and these voyages helped Europe emerged as a powerful new force in the world in the 16th and 17th centuries.

  • Factors such as the Scientific Revolution, the search for a sea route to Asia, the arrival of Columbus and other Europeans to the Americas helped lead to the Columbian Exchange.

The migration of Europeans to the Americas led to an exchange of ideas, culture, foods and languages between the Europeans and the Native Americans as well as the death of millions of Native Americans and Africans as a result of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the Columbian Exchange




WH.H.5.3

Analyze colonization in terms of the desire for access to resources and markets as well as the consequences on indigenous cultures, population, and environment (e.g., commercial revolution, Columbian exchange, religious conversion, spread of Christianity, spread of disease, spread of technology, conquistadors, slave trade, encomienda system, enslavement of indigenous people, mixing of populations, etc.).




WH.H.5.3


  • How and why the new social stratification created by voluntary and coerced interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans in Spanish colonies laid the foundation for centuries of conflict.

  • That the founding of the British colonies in North America occurred within a wide context of events: the decline of American Indian populations, the rise of the Spanish empire, the African slave trade, and the trans-Atlantic trade and migration of Europeans.

  • The Commercial Revolution was a result of the need for new resources and economic markets.

  • The various motivations for the Atlantic slave trade and the impact it had on Europeans, Africans, and Americans.

  • Spanish colonization and the need for new markets created political, economic, and social change in the Americas.

  • The decline in the population of Native Americans as a result of disease spread through the Columbian Exchange.

  • Cultural changes occurred as a result of the Spanish conquest of the Americas.

  • Negative effects of colonialism are that a nation takes land belonging to natives without any consent and generally mistreats the natives afterwards.







WH.H.5.4

Analyze the role of investment in global exploration in terms of its implications for international trade (e.g., transatlantic trade, mercantilism, joint-stock companies, trading companies, government and monarchial funding, corporations, creation of capital markets, etc




WH.H.5.4

  • The economic system of mercantilism and how it affected decisions involving exploration and expansion.

  • How and why the role of mercantilism in stimulating European expansion through trade, conquest and colonization.

  • How economic systems changed as a result of exploration.

  • New business and investment methods (e.g., joint-stock companies) developed in the medieval times that allowed people to pool large amounts of capital needed for overseas ventures.

  • The Commercial Revolution was a period of European economic expansion, colonialism and mercantilism which lasted from approximately the 16th century until the early 18th century.

  • Expanded international trade and the push for overseas empires helped the growth of European capitalism.







WH.H.6.1

Explain how new ideas and theories of the universe altered political thought and affected economic and social conditions (e.g., Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, rationalism, secularism, humanism, tolerance, empiricism, natural rights, contractual government, laissez-faire economics, Bacon, Descartes, Galileo, Newton, inductive and deductive reasoning, heliocentric, inquisition, works of Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Bolivar, Jefferson, Paine, Adam Smith, etc.).




WH.H.6.1

  • How and why the recovery of the late Middle Ages set the stage for changes during the Renaissance and Reformation.

  • Meanings of key terminology as it relates to the Age of Revolutions (e.g., rationalism, reason, humanism, empiricism, heliocentric, geocentric).

  • The impact of humanism on the growth of the Renaissance and the spread of new ideas.

  • Enlightenment theories initiated the questioning of current government practices and prompted the desire for self-rule.

  • How and why various ideals became driving forces for reforms and revolutions (e.g., liberty, popular sovereignty, natural rights, democracy and nationalism).

  • That new intellectual, philosophical, and scientific ideas caused people to reevaluate how they viewed themselves and how they viewed their physical and spiritual worlds.

  • The Inquisition was a direct result of the spread of ideas of the Enlightenment that were in conflict with the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church.

  • How economic conditions were impacted by Enlightenment thinkers.

  • How and why the printing press and other technologies where a catalyst to better









Essential Factual Content

Resources

Suggested Essential Questions

Essential Vocabulary

WH.H.3.1

Charlemagne

Crusades

Hundred Years’ War

Joan of Arc

Magna Carta

Norman conquest

Romanesque and Gothic

architecture

Vikings


Holy Roman Empire

Inquisition


WH.H.4.1

Renaissance

Reformation

Anabaptists

John Calvin

Church of England

Council of Trent

Counter Reformation

English Renaissance

Erasmus


French Renaissance

Henry VIII

Jan Hus

Inquisition



Italian Renaissance

John Knox

Martin Luther

Medicis


Northern Renaissance

printing press

John Wycliffe
WH.H.4.2

Absolutism

Limited Monarchy

Empire


Louis XIV

Divine Right of Kings

Spanish Armada (effects of loss)

WH.H.4.3

feudal relationships

money economy

nation states

rise of the middle class

Black Death

guilds

serfs


troubadours

WH.H.4.4

Dutch India Companies

Line of Demarcation

Northwest Passage

Middle Passage

Jesuits


encomienda

Bartolomé de Las Casas

Spanish hierarchy

Spanish missions

exploration

triangular trade

Columbian exchange

Commercial Revolution



WH.H.5.1

triangular trade

Spanish colonial social

system


mercantilism

capitalism

conquistadores

WH.H.5.2

Colonialism



WH.H.5.3

Conquistadores



WH.H.5.4

Mercantilism

Joint-Stock Company

WH.H.6.1

Scientific Revolution

Enlightenment

Rationalism

Secularism

Humanism


Tolerance

Empiricism

natural rights

contractual government, laissez-faire economics, Bacon

Descartes

Galileo


Newton

inductive and deductive reasoning

heliocentric

inquisition



works of Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Bolivar, Jefferson, Paine, Adam Smith, etc.


WH.H1.1

Timetoast

Timetoast is a place to create timelines that you can add to your blog or website. You can create historical timelines of important events, or build a timeline of your experiences.
WH.H.1.2-WH.H.1.4

Reading Like a Historian

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry.

WH.H.1.1 WH.H.1.3

What is History?

In this lesson, young students will gain a frame of reference for understanding history and for recognizing that the past is different depending on who is remembering and retelling it.

What is geography?
How is time measured?
What makes an event significant?
How do historians evaluate the past?
How do context and perspective effect interpretation of past events?
How did geography shape settlement patterns?
How did the rise of complex institutions impact society?
How did economic organization drive work and trade?
How did economic organization drive work and trade?
How did economic organization drive work and trade?











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