World history and civilization



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WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION



World History and Civilization emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as transcultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice and process skills of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history.
At the high school level, Indiana’s academic standards for social studies provide standards for specific courses that focus on one of the five content areas that make up the core of the social studies curriculum: history; government; geography; economics; and Individuals, society and culture (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). One of these content areas is the major focus of the course while the other areas play supporting roles or become completely integrated into the course content. Supporting content areas are indicated in parentheses. Each high school course continues to develop skills for thinking, inquiry and research, and participation in a democratic society.


  • DOE Code: 1548 (WLD HST/CVL)

  • Recommended Grade Level: None

  • Recommended Prerequisites: None

  • Credits: 2 semester course, 1 credit per semester

  • Fulfills a Social Studies requirement for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40 with Technical Honors diplomas or counts as an Elective for any diploma



CONTENT STANDARDS


Standard 1
Ancient Cultures and Civilizations: c.8000 to 600 BCE


Students examine the movement toward civilization, including those of North Africa, Southwest Asia, South Asia and East Asia from 8000 to 600 BCE
Standard 2

Classical Civilization: 1000 BCE to 600 CE

Students explore the classical civilizations of the Mediterranean, Southwest Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas from 1000 to 600 CE

Standard 3
Major Civilizations and Cultural Interactions: 600 to 1300 CE


Students trace the development and interactions of major civilizations and empires in different regions of the world from 600 to1300 CE

Standard 4 —The Rise of Western Civilization and Global Interaction: 1300 to 1750 CE

Students explore the rise of Europe and its consequences for worldwide exploration and colonization from 1300 to 1750 CE
Standard 5
Revolutions, Nationalism, and Imperial Power: 1500 to 1900 CE


Students examine the causes, events, and global consequences of intellectual, economic, social, and political movements and revolutions from 1500 to 1900 CE

Standard 6
An Era of Global Conflicts, Challenges, Controversies, and Changes: 1900 CE to the Present


Students analyze and explain trends and events of global significance, such as world wars, international controversies and challenges, and cross-cultural changes which have influenced our modern world.

Standard 7 — Historical Thinking

Students conduct historical research that incorporates information literacy skills such as forming appropriate research questions; evaluating information by determining accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness; interpreting a variety of primary and secondary sources; and presenting their findings with documentation.





Standard 1: Ancient Cultures and Civilizations: 8000 to 600 BCE


Students examine the movement toward civilization, including those of North Africa, Southwest Asia, South Asia and East Asia from 8000 to 600 CE.

WH.1.1 Describe and evaluate social, cultural, and economic changes of small agriculture communities which led to

the development of large agricultural settlements such as the movement from hunting and gathering societies

to civilization. (Economics, Geography)
WH.1.2 Identify the key components that make up a civilization and the key differences between civilizations and other forms of social organization. (Geography, Sociology)
WH.1.3 Review the key elements of the development of early river valley civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the

Indus River Valley, and Shang China. (Geography, Sociology)


WH.1.4 Examine the development and characteristics of early empires such as Assyria, Persia, Israel, Minoan, and Zhou. (Geography, Sociology)


Standard 2: Ancient Cultures and Civilizations: c.8000 to 600 BCE


Students explore the classical civilizations of the Mediterranean, Southwest Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas from 1000 to 600 CE
WH.2.1 Review the development and key concepts of major world religions and philosophies including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (Sociology)
WH.2.2 Examine the development of Judaism and the civilization of Ancient Israel, including the origins of monotheism, the significance of the Exodus from Egypt, the Hebrew Bible and the Ten Commandments as the source of many moral and ethical traditions of Western civilization.
WH.2.3 Examine the development of Greek civilization including differing political and social structures as well as conflicts such as the Persian and Peloponnesian wars. (Sociology, Economics, Government, Geography)
WH.2.4 Describe the rise of Alexander the Great and the influence of Hellenism in Southwest and South Asia,

North Africa, and parts of Europe.


WH.2.5 Analyze the development of Roman Republican government and society. (History, Government, Sociology)
WH.2.6 Trace the changes that culminated in the end of the Republic and the formation of the Roman Empire.
WH.2.7 Examine the origins, rise, and spread of Christianity including the life of Jesus, and Christianity’s impact on the Roman Empire. (Sociology)

WH.2.8 Analyze the causes, conditions, and consequences of the decline and fall of the western part of the Roman Empire.
WH.2.9 Examine the significant achievements of the Greeks and Romans and their impact on the modern world. (Individuals, Society and Culture)
WH.2.10 Trace the development and major achievements of civilizations in India such as the Mauryan and Gupta empires. (Geography, Sociology)
WH.2.11 Compare and contrast the influence of Hinduism and Buddhism on civilization in India and Buddhism’s spread throughout Asia. (Psychology, Sociology)
WH.2.12 Compare and contrast the influence of Confucianism, Taoism, and Legalism on East Asian civilizations. (Sociology)
WH.2.13 Trace the developments and achievements of the Qin and Han Dynasties. (Government, Sociology)


Standard 3: Major Civilizations and Cultural Interactions: 600 to 1300 CE



Students trace the development and interactions of major civilizations and empires in different regions of the world from 600 to1300 CE

WH.3.1 Analyze the impact of trade networks such as the Silk Road and Indian Ocean trade network.
WH.3.2 Explain the rise and achievements of the Byzantine Empire.
WH.3.3 Explain the division between the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity as a result of the Great Schism of 1054.
WH.3.4 Examine the origins, rise, and spread of Islam including the life of Muhammad, and Islam’s division into the Sunnis and Shiites..
WH.3.5 Trace the spread of Islam and its impact throughout Southern Europe, Northern Africa and Asia.
WH.3.6 Explain the role of Christianity as a unifying force in medieval Europe.
WH.3.7 Describe the rise and achievements of Charlemagne and the birth of the Holy Roman Empire.
WH.3.8 Analyze the consequences of the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the development of feudalism and manorialism on Europe.
WH.3.9 Explain the cultural, political and religious causes of the Crusades and their consequences for Europe and Southwest Asia, including the growth in power of the monarchies in Europe.
WH.3.10 Describe the improvements in agriculture, the growth of towns, and the commercial revival during the Middle Ages.
WH.3.11 Examine the key achievements of civilizations in Africa prior to European contact.
WH.3.12 Compare and contrast the developments and achievements of the Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations.

WH.3.13 Explain and understand the achievements of the Tang and Song Dynasties.
WH.3.14 Describe and explain the rise, expansion and decline of the Mongol Empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples.
WH.3.15 Examine the development of feudalism in Japan and its impact on Japanese society and government.


Standard 4: The Rise of Western Civilization and Global Interaction: 1300 to 1750 CE


Students explore the rise of Europe and its consequences for worldwide exploration and colonization—1300 to 1750 CE.
WH.4.1 Trace the origins and developments of the European Renaissance and its impact throughout Western Europe.
WH.4.2 Analyze the factors that led to the rise and spread of the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, as well as reforming movements in other religions, including the wars of religion.
WH.4.3 Discuss the emergence, role, and impact of the citizen in nation-states.
WH.4.4 Explain the causes of the worldwide voyages of exploration.
WH.4.5 Explain consequences of the conquests and colonization as a result of the worldwide voyages of exploration including the transatlantic slave trade, Columbian Exchange, and the effects on native populations in the Americas.
WH.4.6 Examine the growth and development of the European economic system as a result of exploration and the growth of mercantilism.
WH.4.7 Trace the development of the gunpowder empires such as the Ottoman, Mughal, and Ming empires and their reaction to Western interaction.
WH.4.8 Trace the development and impact of absolute monarchies in Europe.
WH.4.9 Describe the progression of events in England that led to constitutional monarchy such as the Magna Carta, the English Civil War, and the Glorious Revolution of 1688.



Standard 5: Revolutions, Nationalism, and Imperial Power: 1500 to 1900 CE


Students examine the causes, events, and global consequences of intellectual, economic, social, and political movements and revolutions from 1500 to 1900 CE

WH.5.1 Explain the key developments of the Scientific Revolution and its impact on the world.
WH.5.2 Explain the key ideas of the Enlightenment in European history and describe its impact upon political and religious thought and culture in Europe and the Americas including the foundation of American government.
WH.5.3 Examine the key causes, events, and consequences of the French Revolution as well as the rise and fall of Napoleon.
WH.5.4 Trace events, explain the causes, and analyze the outcomes for the Latin American independence movements of the nineteenth century.
WH.5.5 Explain the reasons for the rise of nation-states and the effects of nationalism in Europe, North America and Asia.
WH.5.6 Explain the causes and conditions of the Industrial Revolution in England, Europe, and the United States.
WH.5.7 Examine the economic, social, and political changes caused by the Industrial Revolution and their impact on the development of political and economic theory.
WH.5.8 Analyze the causes and consequences of European imperialism upon the indigenous peoples of Africa, Asia and Oceania.
WH.5.9 Compare and contrast the responses of China and Japan to challenges by Western imperial powers.

Standard 6: An Era of Global Conflicts, Challenges, Controversies, and Changes: 1900 CE to the Present


Students analyze and explain trends and events of global significance, such as world wars, international controversies and challenges, and cross-cultural changes which have influenced our modern world.

WH.6.1 Trace and explain the long-term and immediate causes (including Nationalism, Imperialism, Militarism, and Alliances), major events and global consequences of World War I.
WH.6.2 Explain the causes and consequences of the Russian Revolutions of 1917 and the establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
WH.6.3 Examine the events and developments of the interwar period and their impact on the beginning of WWII including the impact of WWI on society, the Great Depression, and the rise of totalitarianism.
WH.6.4 Identify the causes and key events of World War II and analyze the impact this war had on the global

community.


WH.6.5 Examine the causes, course, and effects of the Holocaust including accounts of camp inmates, survivors,

liberators, and perpetrators; and, summarize world responses including the Nuremberg Trials.


WH.6.6 Explain the causes and consequences of the Cold War and describe the role it played in ethnic or nationalistic conflicts in various parts of the world.
WH.6.7 Describe the paths to decolonization and independence from colonial rule in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.
WH.6.8 Explain the origins of the modern State of Israel.
WH.6.9 Trace the rise of communism in China including its foundations, the Cultural Revolution, and

modern day developments.



WH.6.10 Describe and analyze the global expansion of democracy and globalization in the late 20th century.

WH.6.11 Investigate current global issues such as terrorism, genocide, and environmental issues.

Standard 7: Historical Thinking


Students conduct historical research that incorporates information literacy skills such as forming appropriate research questions; evaluating information by determining accuracy, relevance and comprehensiveness; interpreting a variety of primary and secondary sources; and presenting their findings with documentation.

Chronological Thinking, Analysis and Interpretation, Research, Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making

WH.7.1 Identify patterns of historical change and duration and construct a representation that illustrates continuity and change.

WH.7.2 Locate and analyze primary sources and secondary sources related to an event or issue of the past.



WH.7.3 Investigate and interpret multiple causation in analyzing historical actions and analyze cause-and-effect relationships.



WH.7.4 Explain issues and problems of the past by analyzing various interests and viewpoints of the participants involved.



WH.7.5 Use technology in the process of conducting historical research and to present products of historical research.



WH.7.6 Formulate and present a position or course of action on an issue by examining the underlying factors contributing to that issue and support that position.



Approved March 2014 World History and Civilization, Page


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