Works Cited Primary Sources



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Works Cited

Primary Sources



03.05 Analyze the Growth and Influence of Political Machines, the Muckrakers, and Progressives. N.d. Photograph. Welcome to the Utah Electronic High School. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this website for a primary source in the form of a political cartoon showing how deeply influenced Prohibition was by women.

Accountable in Action. N.d. Photograph. Accountable in Action. Accountableinaction.org. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . This primary source in a picture of Susan B. Anthony, a Prohibition supporter. This is a primary source because it is a picture made during the Temperance Movement.

Al Capone. 1930. Photograph. Time Magazine. Time Inc. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We used this website because it had a picture of Al Capone on the cover of Time Magazine. We found it interesting that Time Magazine had an article on Al Capone because that meant that during Prohibition, he was internationally famous. This is a primary source because it is a magazine cover from Prohibition.

Blumenthal, Karen, and Jay Colvin. Bootleg: Murder, Moonshine, and the Lawless Years of Prohibition. New York: Roaring Brook, 2011. Print. We used this primary source book, for its many helpful quotes, and exceptional photographs that were said/taken during that time period. This is a primary source because it contains many quotations and pictures from during Prohibition.



Board of Directors, Anti-Saloon League of America. 1924. Photograph. Indianapolis. Library of Congress. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this website because it contained a photograph of the board of directors of the Anti-Saloon League in 1924. This is a primary source because it is a photograph taken during the time of Prohibition.

Bottle of Bonded Medicinal Whiskey, "For Medical Purposes Only" N.d. Photograph. Culver Pictures. PBS. PBS. Web. 9 Feb. 2014. . We used this Photograph that was taken in the times of the prohibition to show the things people did to obtain alcohol. We found it enlightening because we didn't realize just how far people would go to thwart the law. This is a primary source because it was taken during Prohibition.

"Carry Nation Quotes." BrainyQuote. Xplore, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. . From this website we got quotes from Carrie Nation that we thought embodied her personality. These quotes are primary sources because Carrie Nation, a Dry advocate, said them during the Temperance movement.

"Carry Nation Quotes." Successories. Successories.com, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. . On this website we found a quote we think embodies the character of Carrie Nation. These quotes are primary sources because they are quoted from Carrie Nation who was alive during the Temperance Movement.

Dr. Seuss. "Your Nutty Aunt Carrie Is Loose Again!" Cartoon. Media of Prohibition. Http://www.albany.edu/, n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained a political cartoon made by Dr. Seuss, who was a well known childrens author. We found it interesting to see his political views because his father was a beer brewer during Prohibition.

"Female Attitudes of Prohibition." Female Attitudes of Prohibition. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. I used this website for photos demonstrating what a Women's Christian Temperance Union protest might look like.

"Former President Taft." Case Studies. Cornell College, n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . This source contained quotes from President William Howard Taft on the subject of Prohibition. It was interesting to see that he opposed to Prohibition, because he was the president who was forced into passing the 18th amendment. This is a primary source because it contains quotes from President Taft during the Prohibition era.

"Frances E. Willard | Temperance & Prohibition." Frances E. Willard | Temperance & Prohibition. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. This gave me a variety of speeches by Frances Willard.

"Frances E. Willard Statues." Flickr. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. On this website I found a statue of Frances Willard to emphasize her importance.

Fulton, Charles. "Goodbye, Booze." N.d. Library of Congress. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. . We used this audio recording on our website because we thought it gave a good 1920's atmosphere to our page. It also provided insight for us on what types of music people listened to during Prohibition. This is a primary source because it was sung during Prohibition.

Garcia, James. "Political Cartoons as Muckrakes: Reform Through Late 19th Century Editorial Art." American History Teachers' Collaborative Lesson Plan. Usd116.org, 2009. Web. 20 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained many political cartoons from the Temperance Movement. We found many interesting political cartoons to put on our website that reflected the spirit of the Temperance Movement. This is a primary source because it contains many political cartoons that were made during the Temperance Movement.

"He Died For My Grins: Women's Christian Temperance Union." He Died For My Grins: Women's Christian Temperance Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. I used this website for a picture representing how the Women's Christian Temperance Union advertised their ideas.

"How Prohibition Worked." HowStuffWorks. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. I used this website to show what a typical Women's Christian Temperance Union march would look like.



Howard H. Russell. N.d. Photograph. Anti-Saloon League. Web. 4 Dec. 2013.
. This is a picture of Reverend Howard Hyde Russell. We used this picture in our Anti-Saloon League page, because Howard Hyde Russell was one of the founders and the first leader of the Anti-Saloon League.

Inventions:. N.d. Photograph. Mrmorganperiod1. Http://mrmorganperiod1.wikispaces.com/. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . This picture is a good example of a primary source that explains the attitude towards prohibition in that time period.

Key Stone Liquor Co. Before The Prohibition. 1915. Photograph. Seatle. HistoryLink.org. Comp. MOHAI. 6 Nov. 2003. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. . We used this website for more information on what it was like to be a restaurant or saloon during the prohibition, and its good photographs.

Kurz, and Allison. Anti Prohibition. 1888. Photograph. Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Popular Graphic Arts. Library of Congress. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this website to find a picture of an anti-Prohibition poster. This is a primary source because it was made during the Temperance movement.

LaGuardia, Fiorella. "Http://prohibition.osu.edu/american-prohibition-1920/fiorella-laguardia-prohibition." Temperance And Prohibition. Ohio State University, n.d. Web. 3 Jan. 2014. . We used this source because it contained in it many wise words from Fiorella LaGuardia. From this source we learned about many important statistics from Prohibition. This is a primary source because Fiorella LaGuardia wrote it during Prohibition.

Lantz, Mary. "The Drunkard and His Family." N.d. Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, Ca. 1820-1860. Library of Congress. Web. 05 Dec. 2013. . We used this source to find a variety of Prohibition and Temperance era songs and sheet music.



Lips That Touch Liquor Should Not Touch Ours. N.d. Photograph. Bills. Wordpress. Web. 03 Feb. 2014. . We used this source in a slideshow on the Temperance Movement. We found this picture very interesting and thought that it portrayed the Temperance Movement very well.

McCready, John. "The Drunkard's Doom." N.d. Library of Congress. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We used this audio recording because we thought it gave a good atmosphere to our page. We learned that music was one of the ways people spread propaganda and found the recording very entertaining to listen to. This is a primary source because it was sung during the Prohibition era.

McIlvaine, Charles P. "The Scourge of Intemperance." Speech. 1836. Annals of American History. Encyclopedia Britannica, 2014. Web. 11 Jan. 2014. . We used this source to get a first hand account of speeches from the Temperance Movement. We found it interesting to learn about what the Prohibition supporters had to say before their law was passed.

"Modern American History." Modern American History. Http://blsciblogs.baruch.cuny.edu/, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We found a primary source on this website in the form of a photo of Frances Willard that is very informative to who she was.



The Moonshine Stimulus. N.d. Photograph. NPR. National Public Radio, 3 Aug. 2010. Web. 20 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained a picture of large anti-Prohibition parade float made in 1925. This is a primary source because it is a picture taken in 1925, during Prohibition.

Murray, Bill. "How Are You Goin' To Wet Your Whistle?" 1919. Library of Congress. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. . We used this audio recording to give our website a 1920's atmosphere and to demonstrate what people thought of Prohibition. This is a primary source because the song came out during Prohibition.

"National Women's History Museum." Education & Resources. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. I used this website to find out what Frances Willard's early life was like.

N.d. Photograph. Anti-Saloon League Museum. Wpl.lib.oh.us. Web. 4 Dec. 2013. . This is a picture of Howard Hyde Russell and Ernest Charrington. We used this picture on the Anti-Saloon page on our website because Howard Hyde Russell and Ernest Charrington were both important figures in this organization.

N.d. Photograph. The Beginnings of Prohibition. By William A. Meredith. Albany.edu, 29 Apr. 2005. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this source for its primary source poster from the time before Prohibition. We learned from this poster that many people tried to connect patriotism with Prohibition. This is a primary source because it was made and hung during the Prohibition era.

N.d. Photograph. The Demon of Rum: Ten Prohibition Propaganda Posters Photo Gallery. Crime Library. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it had many pictures featuring dry propaganda. It also had a quote from a song from the Temperance movement. This is a primary source because all of the posters, photographs, and song lyrics were from the Temperance Movement.

N.d. Photograph. Library of Congress. The Wall Street Journal. By Russ Smith. Dow Jones & Company, 14 May 2010. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it had a very good quality picture of Wayne Wheeler, a leader in the Anti-Saloon league. This is a primary source because it's a picture taken during the time of Prohibition.

N.d. Photograph. NYC in the Prohibition Days. Nydailynews.com, 16 Jan. 2011. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We used this website because it provided many photographs of people during Prohibition. This is a primary source because they were photographs taken during Prohibition.

Orr, Carey. "Bulletproof." n.d.: n. pag. Chicago Tribune. Janet A. Ginsburg. Web. 06 Feb. 2014. . This newspaper was used for the political cartoon it had about the rise of criminals during the prohibition.

"The Osborne County Hall of Fame." The Osborne County Hall of Fame. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. I used this website to find a picture I thought displayed what a Women's Christian Temperance Union protest would look like.

"The Osborne County Hall of Fame." The Osborne County Hall of Fame. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. I used this website to find a picture of a logo used to represent the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

Prescription for Medicinal Liquor, Attached to Whiskey Bottle Sold by Bartell Drugs, Seattle, July 1933. 1933. Photograph. HistoryLink.org- the Free Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History. By Phil Dougherty. Bartell Drugs, 29 Dec. 2009. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. . This was another photograph of prescribed whiskey that we found useful to help show what extents people went to, to obtain alcohol.

"Prohibition Is a Failure." YouTube. YouTube, 26 Aug. 2009. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We found a recording on this website that portrayed negative feelings towards Prohibition. This is a primary source.



Prohibition. N.d. Photograph. Washington State History Society. Http://www.washingtonhistory.org/. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . This primary source is a photograph of women marching against alcohol that shows the influence of women in the Prohibition.

"Prohibition Party Cartoons." Cartoon. Temperance & Prohibition. Ohio State University, n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. . We used this website because it contained many cartoons designed by the Prohibition Party. This is a primary source because it contains political cartoons made during the Temperance Movement.

"Prohibition." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 14 Feb. 2014. . This website was very valuable and was used to find the effects of Prohibition both economic and regarding organized crime.

Riis, Jacob. "The Reign of Rum." How The Other Half Lives. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. TenantNet. Tenant.net. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this website because it contained a short book that Jacob Riis, a well known journalist, wrote in 1889. This is a primary source because it is the online publication of a book written during the Temperance Era.

Rogers, Duke. "Save A Little Dram For Me." Rec. 1922. N.d. Library of Congress. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. . We used this source because it contained audio for music that was popular during Prohibition. We thought the music added to the website's authenticity and made it more interactive. This audio recording is a primary source because it is a song that was sung during Prohibition.

Sauter, Dale. "Prohibition Propaganda Broadside, Circa 1908." Special Collections Staff Picks. Http://digital.lib.ecu.edu/, n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained a primary source picture from 1908. Within that picture we found a poem, written by a "dry". This source helped us to gain insight on the propaganda that was spread during the time period.



Search : Collections Online : Minnesota Historical Society. N.d. Photograph. Search : Collections Online : Minnesota Historical Society. Greatriversnetwork.org. Web. 20 Feb. 2014. . This website is filled with pictures that are good examples of primary sources, and show artifacts that are true to that time period.

"Sociological Images." Sociological Images RSS. Http://thesocietypages.org/, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . This primary source is a picture, an advertisement that shows negative feelings towards the repeal of prohibition.

"Sociological Images." Sociological Images RSS. Http://www.searchquotes.com/, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . I got a quote describing feelings towards the repeal of the Prohibition on this wesite, an example of a primary source.

Sprecher, Hannah. "Let Them Drink and Forget Our Poverty" : Orthodox Rabbis React to Prohibition." Http://americanjewisharchives.org, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it had an excerpt from the Volstead Act on the rules of sacramental alcohol. It was interesting to witness exactly what people could get away with and what was illegal.

"Temperance and Prohibition Era Propaganda: A Study in Rhetoric." Alcohol, Temperance and Prohibition. Brown University, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it provided us with many primary source quotes from people who supported the Temperance movement. This is a primary source because it contains quotes from the Temperance Movement.

"The Temperance Movement - The Prohibition Era." The Prohibition Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. I found a picture on this website I thought provided some knowledge to what it may have been like to be part of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

"The Temperance Movement - The Prohibition Era." The Prohibition Era. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. I used this website for a picture that I think shows what being in the Women's Christian Temperance Union might have been like.

"Temperance Quotes." BrainyQuote. Xplore, n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. On this website I found a quote that illustrated Frances Willard's idea of temperance.



TIME Magazine Cover: Andrew J. Volstead - Mar. 29, 1926. 1926. Photograph. Time. Time Inc. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it had a picture of Andrew Volstead on the cover of Time Magazine. From this, we learned that Andrew Volstead must have been extremely important at the time. This is a primary source because it shows the cover of a magazine printed during Prohibition.

"The 21st Amendment." The 21st Amendment. Www.albany.edu, n.d. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. This primary source was found on a website and is a copy of the 21st Amendment.



U.S. Capitol Historical Society. N.d. Photograph. US Capitol Historical Society. Http://uschs.wordpress.com/. Web. 19 Feb. 2014. This Website was used for a picture that is a primary source. The picture emphasized the repeal of Prohibition.

"U.S. Is Voted Dry." (16 Jan. 1919): n. pag. The 18th Amendment. Albany.edu. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained the picture of a newspaper from the day Prohibition was ratified by Congress. This is a primary source because it is a newspaper published during Prohibition.

U.S.A. The Volstead Act. By Andrew Volstead. Potsdam.edu, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this source to get the full version of the Volstead Act. It was interesting to see how long and complicated it was, and we learned a lot about Prohibition by looking at the laws that were passed to help enforce them. This is a primary source because it was made during the time of Prohibition.

Vote "No" on the Prohibition Amendment [political Advertisement]. N.d. Photograph. Ohiohistory.org / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 /. Library of Congress. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this source because it contained a poster that advertised the bad side of Prohibition and told its lookers to vote no. This is a primary source because it had a poster that was made during the Temperance Movement.

"Wayne Bidwell Wheeler." The Clarence Darrow Collection. The University of Minnesota, n.d. Web. 15 Jan. 2014. . We used this source for it's primary source quotes on prohibition from an excerpt of Clarence Darrow's autobiography. We also found a photograph of Wayne Wheeler, which we used on the Anti-Saloon League page.

Westerville Miner. "The Saloon in an Illinois Coal-Mining Town | Temperance & Prohibition." Interview. The Saloon in an Illinois Coal-Mining Town. Ohio State University, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We used this source to obtain an excerpt of an interview conducted during the Prohibition era about saloons in a small mining village. This provided valuable insight on the importance of saloons to low income workers. This is a primary source because it was an interview conducted during the time of Prohibition.

"Wheel Within a Wheel." Barnes & Noble. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. On this website I found a description of a book Frances Willard wrote, one briefly mentioned in our project.



Why We Get High, Part 4: Alcohol, The 800 Pound Elephant in the Room. N.d. Photograph. OB Rag RSS. Http://obrag.org/. Web. 20 Feb. 2014. I used this website for a primary source; a political cartoon which explained the attitude of many American citizens towards Prohibition well.

"Wikia." LyricWiki. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. . I used this website to find quotes from members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

"Wikia." LyricWiki. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2014. We used this website for information about a song commonly sung by members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union.

"Wisco Histo." Wisco Histo. Http://wiscohisto.tumblr.com/, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2014. . We found a photo that's a primary source on this website that represents how people reacted to the repeal of Prohibition.



"The Women's Christian Temperance Union." The Women's Christian Temperance Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014. On this website I found a picture that represented the Women's Christian Temperance Union's feelings towards alcohol.


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