Women's Trade Union League and Its Leaders Reel Listing Anderson, Mary



Download 486.97 Kb.
Page9/14
Date conversion29.04.2016
Size486.97 Kb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14

Reel: 20
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Papers on Special Topics -- Songs, Skits, and Benefits; Labor Plays; Articles and Speeches.

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; Files of the New York WTUL itself resume on this reel. The first section (frames 1-408) contains material about League songs, skits, and benefits. Included in one chronological sequence are light-hearted verses about League and labor matters, written to familiar melodies and sung at League meetings; dramatic skits and short plays for similar occasions; and records of the League's annual fund-raising benefit performances of concerts by noted soloists or of current Broadway plays. Among the skits are two written by Mary Dreier and one in honor of rose Schneiderman (1943). The material on League benefits includes programs, clippings of newspaper publicity, and financial summaries. Except for two earlier printed items -- a leaflet of labor songs for the League's national convention of 1915 and a collection of verses by League members, The Voice of Labor, published by the National WTUL in 1919 -- material in this section dates from 1926 to 1954, with undated items at the end.The next section (frames 409-862) pertains to labor plays written or published by organizations other than the WTUL. It includes printed, duplicated, and typed texts of plays, along with lists of plays available for amateur production compiled by such organizations as the Workers Education Bureau and the American Labor Education Service. There are indications that this file may have been assembled originally by the national office of the WTUL.The balance of the reel (frames 863-1157) is made up of typed texts of articles or speeches by members of the New York WTUL (1921-55 and undated). Speeches, including radio addresses, predominate. The majority of the items are by Rose Schneiderman, but there are two by Mary Dreier, several by Mabel Leslie, and one by Maud Swartz. Texts of additional Schneiderman speeches can be found in the Schneiderman Papers, as microfilmed elsewhere in this edition.

Reel: 21
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Margaret Dreier Robins Correspondence.

1909-1910

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; Affairs of the WTUL bulk much more largely in the correspondence between MDR and Mary Dreier on this reel as compared with the last. MDR's letters reflect the energy and zest she is bringing to the work; Mary Dreier's, a new assurance. "How Mary has developed and 'come out'," comments Elizabeth Robins to MDR (Aug. 6, 1910). As leaders of local Leagues, MDR and Mary discuss their problems with everything from strikes to picnics, including record-keeping and internal dissension (as in the Eva Valesh case in New York). The Chicago League's successful campaign for a state ten-hour law for women is documented in letters of MDR, Agnes Nestor, and others (March-June 1909). When a court test of its constitutionality seems likely, Josephine Goldmark of the National Consumers' League offers her assistance and that of Louis D. Brandeis (see MDR-Goldmark correspondence, July-December 1909). The assistance of Brandeis to the New York WTUL in another case is described in a letter from Helen Marot (July 1910). Some comments about the New York League's shirtwaist workers' strike can be found in Mary Dreier's letters of November-December 1909. MDR on Feb. 14, 1910, refers to the settlement she and Agnes Nestor have won in the Philadelphia phase of the strike. In other letters, MDR reports her appointment by President Gompers of the AF of L to its Industrial Education Committee and Gompers' invitation to her to accompany him and his family on a tour of Europe (Mar. 3, 1909) and appraises the workings of that committee and of the AF of L convention (Aug. 21, Nov. 16, 18, 23, 1909). Her participation in the American Association for Labor Legislation is reflected in letters from John B. Andrews and Irene Osgood (who were married at the Dreier family home in August 1910). Other letters of interest are from Frances Kellor (Aug. 4, 1910) and Alice Stone Blackwell (Aug. 26, 1910). Elizabeth Robins writes about the English suffragists and other matters, and there are individual letters from John R. Commons, Leonora O'Reilly, and Mary Macarthur of the British Women's Trade Union League. MDR's letters of October 1910 give a glimpse of the range of her activities, which in one week include presiding over a suffrage conference, speaking before the Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs, and attending both a state legislative conference of trade union women and the convention of the State Federation of Labor.



Reel: 21
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Printed and Duplicated Material -- Serial Publications and Miscellaneous.

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; This reel marks the start of Series 4 of the New York Women's Trade Union League Records, containing printed and duplicated material. Partial files of the League's serial publications make up the bulk of the reel: Annual Reports (frames 1-433), Monthly Bulletins (frames 434-726), and Convention Reports (frames 729-790).The Annual Reports, issued after the annual meeting in March (in later years, April), summarize the League's activities of the preceding year. The file here includes reports in printed form for 1907-08, 1908-09, 1909-10, 1918-19, 1920-22, 1924-25, 1926-27, 1927-28, and 1930-31, and a largely complete run of the mimeographed Reports issued thereafter through 1950-51. Interfiled with the published Reports are occasional typed reports compiled by the president or secretary, presumably for delivery at the annual meeting; other reports of this type may be found within Series 1, on Reels 1-5. Contents of the typed reports overlap with but are by no means identical with the published Reports. A somewhat more complete file of the Annual Reports, particularly for the years 1910-18, has been assembled elsewhere in the present microfilm edition of sources, on Reel 8 of the Women's Trade Union League Publications.Apart from one issue each for 1919 and 1931, the file of the Monthly Bulletin begins in 1932 and continues through what may well have been the final issue, February 1955. It is strongest for the years 1942-55; earlier years are weak or lacking altogether. Considerably better coverage of the period 1917-41 can be found in Reel 8 of the Women's Trade Union League Publications.The four Convention Reports, for 1922-24, 1924-26, 1926-29, and 1929-36, are similar in format and content to the printed Annual Reports. They were issued in connection with national conventions of the WTUL and summarized the New York League's work since the preceding convention.The remaining material on the reel is extremely miscellaneous. A section of WTUL items (frames 791-885) includes eight pamphlets or leaflets issued by the National League, several issued by the New York League, excerpts from an address by Matilda Lindsay of the National WTUL at the AF of L convention of 1930, a radio speech by Rose Schneiderman (1935), and a memorial booklet on Margaret Dreier Robins issued by the Chicago WTUL (1945). (Included within the collection, but not filmed, is an incomplete set of the printed proceedings of National WTUL conventions.) A final miscellaneous section (frames 886-1091) includes a mimeographed report of a conference called by the New York WTUL in Albany (1920?) and several items representing the opposition of the WTUL and other organizations to the Equal Rights Amendment, including a set of statements made before the Senate Judiciary Committee in February 1938.

Reel: 22
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Margaret Dreier Robins Correspondence.



January 1911 - April 1913

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; WTUL affairs continue to engross much of MDR's and Mary Dreier's attention during 1911 and the first half of 1912. There are some references in the correspondence to MDR's leadership in the Chicago clothing workers' strike (January-February 1911) and, that fall, to organizing work and arbitration machinery at the firm of Hart, Schaffner & Marx. MDR describes a strike of button makers she aided in Muscatine, Iowa, and shows repeated concern over the editorial policies, business management, and outreach of the League's new magazine, Life and Labor. Mary Dreier reports on internal problems of the Boston WTUL (Jan. 31, Feb. 2, 1911). Her letters during 1912 include references to her work on the New York Factory Investigating Commission. Other WTUL activities touched upon in the reel include passage and legal defense of a new and broader ten-hour law in Illinois (see letters of Katharine Coman, Agnes Nestor, Josephine Goldmark, and others, 1911 and early 1912); the founding of a branch in Baltimore (Elizabeth K. Ellicott, May 21, 1911); the Boston League's involvement in the Lawrence textile strike (see especially Elizabeth Glendower Evans, Mar. 25, 1912); and the appropriation of $600 for League organizing work by the carpenters' national union (Frank Duffy, Jan. 13, 1913). Letters from Pauline Newman and Leonora O'Reilly report on the corset workers' strike in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and other matters, including O'Reilly's WTUL-affiliated Wage Earners' Suffrage League in New York, which she sees as building "a woman's movement in the land on a Labor Foundation" (Sept. 23, 1912).References to the WTUL all but disappear in the second half of 1912 as both MDR and her sister are caught up in the Progressive party. MDR takes vigorous charge of the women's branch of the party's campaign in Illinois. Her papers include both office correspondence (for closely related material see Reel 15, frames 422-520) and penciled accounts to her sister of her campaign speaking in downstate farm areas. A letter from Theodore Roosevelt (Nov. 7) thanks MDR and her husband for their work. On family matters, a crisis in August 1911 -- the marriage of MDR's sister Katherine to a fellow artist and its quick annulment as bigamous -- leads to a flurry of correspondence and the drafting of Mary Dreier to take Katherine to Europe. Mary's severe illness in the winter and spring of 1912-13 further interrupts her work. A letter of MDR to Charles R. Crane, Jan. 30, 1913, asking how the federal government might help save some of the natural beauty near her Florida estate signals her strengthening ties there. Other correspondents on the reel include Elizabeth Robins, Fred B. Smith, Raymond Robins' associate in the Men and Religion Forward Movement, and, in one or two letters each, Jane Addams, Anita McCormick Blaine, Louise de Koven Bowen, Edward T. Devine, Ethel S. Dummer, Harold L. Ickes, Frances Kellor, Ruth Hanna McCormick, Helen Marot, Louis F. Post, and Harriet Taylor Upton.

Reel: 22
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Margaret Dreier Robins Correspondence.

May 1913 - December 1915

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; Coverage of WTUL affairs is more spotty in this reel. Although MDR and Mary Dreier each steps down from the presidency of her local League, MDR in 1913 and Mary Dreier in 1914, there is no reference to the latter event. MDR's letters in 1914 touch upon her successful effort to get Agnes Nestor appointed to the federal Commission on Vocational Education, her support of striking copper miners at the Calumet & Hecla Company in Michigan, and the National League's new school for women organizers. Some discordances within the New York WTUL are mentioned: between the socialist members and Melinda Scott (November 1913) and between Mary Dreier and the trade-union members over supporting a state minimum-wage law for women, which the Factory. Investigating Commission recommended but the AF of L opposed (August 1914, February 1915). Several letters from Louisa Mittelstadt report on the Kansas City League. MDR's letters of 1915 discuss with considerable frankness the crisis in the affairs of Life and Labor and its resolution. They also refer to tensions between the WTUL and the AF of L and to negotiations with President Gompers and his executive council, but give few details; for these one must turn to the Library of Congress collection of the League's records, filmed in conjunction with the present microfilm edition. Correspondence between MDR and Mary Dreier lapses during the last three months of 1915 when MDR is in the East raising money for the National League and aiding the suffrage campaign in New York state, in which Mary is deeply involved. During the sojourn the affairs of the Chicago League -- including a strike of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers to which the League, constrained by its AF of L ties, can give no overt aid -- are reported to MDR in letters from Olive Sullivan, Agnes Nestor, Mary Anderson, and Amy Walker Field. The reel includes some 16 letters between Leonora O'Reilly and MDR; O'Reilly comments on her suffrage work, voices her disillusion with New York trade unionists, and gives her thoughts on peace. Two letters to MDR from John Fitzpatrick of the Chicago Federation of Labor (June 24, 1913; Dec. 3, 1915) convey the warm rapport between them. A letter from Frank P. Walsh (Oct. 22, 1915) credits MDR's appearance before his federal Commission on Industrial Relations with having done much to shape its work. Other correspondents on the reel include Alice Henry and Stella Franklin of the WTUL, Elizabeth Robins, Grace Dodge, Harold L. Ickes, Anna W. Ickes, Alice Thacher Post (on the Woman's Peace Party), and, in single letters, Carrie Chapman Catt and Harriot Stanton Blatch (on MDR's aid to the New York suffrage campaign), William Jennings Bryan, Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, Graham Taylor, and Walter Weyl.



Reel: 23
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Printed and Duplicated Material -- Legislative and Congressional Bills.

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; Filmed on these two reels are groups of state and federal bills pertaining to labor (or, in some cases, to broader public issues) with which the New York WTUL was concerned. With a few exceptions, these are the official printed texts of the bills as introduced. Both groups are arranged chronologically. State bills come first, comprising all of Reel 23 (1915-50) and two-thirds of Reel 24 (1951-55). A small group of Congressional bills, ranging in date from 1915 to 1954, make up the balance of Reel 24 (frames 434-686).Despite the broad time span of the two groups, their coverage is highly uneven. Within the state file, there are up to a dozen bills for each of the years 1916-19 but only three for the entire 1920's, eight for the 1930's, and seven for the years 1941-46. The largest holdings are for 1947-55. A similar emphasis exists among the federal bills.

Reel: 23; 24
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Margaret Dreier Robins Correspondence.



January 1916 - December 1917

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; Women's Trade Union League affairs are somewhat overshadowed on this reel by the presidential campaign of 1916 and then by the impact of America's entry into World War I. The correspondence between MDR and Mary Dreier does, however, touch upon League matters, particularly during the first part of 1916, and there are reports to MDR during her Florida sojourns from Agnes Nestor, Mary Anderson, and other League associates in Chicago. Both this reel and the next also include occasional letters by MDR to wealthy donors in which she describes recent WTUL activities at some length, with special emphasis on the training school for organizers. (Several letters from one of its graduates, Agnes Burns, are on the reel.)The collapse of the Progressive party in 1916 propels both MDR and her sister into the Republican camp. MDR in several letters gives her reasons for supporting Charles Evans Hughes; Mary Dreier reports the dismay and incomprehension of her trade union friends in New York over their choice. MDR spends most of October as chief speaker on a Women's Hughes Campaign Train touring the West. Two letters from Frances Kellor document the arrangements for the tour, but only one item gives a first-hand glimpse of MDR's campaign experience.Wartime matters predominate after April 1917. Several items concern early pressure by Agnes Nestor and others to get trade union women represented on the committees being set up to spur war production. MDR in letters to her sisters and others describes her work as chairman of the Department of Women and Children in Industry of the Illinois Division of the Woman's Committee, Council of National Defense. Samuel Gompers in July appoints her to a committee under his branch of the Council of National Defense but two months later (so she reports) engineers her defeat for reelection to the executive board of the Chicago Federation of Labor. Several letters from Mary Anderson report on her organizing work for the WTUL. There are a few references to the successful woman suffrage campaign in New York state and Mary Dreier's part in it.Several of MDR's letters on this reel show her gift for lively description and thoughtful analysis. They give her reactions to current events and to people: visiting British officials; delegates to the State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs, at which she speaks; and former House Speaker Joseph Cannon, on whom she calls at his downstate home. A letter to Mary Dreier (Oct. 7, 1917) pictures vividly Theodore Roosevelt's visit to the Robinses' tenement apartment. In two letters to Carrie Chapman Catt (November 1917) MDR analyzes the shortcomings of the wartime agencies dealing with women and, in declining appointment as a vice president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, stresses the importance of the WTUL as giving women workers a base from which to fight for proper recognition from the AF of L. The reel includes several letters between MDR and Leonora O'Reilly, several from Elizabeth Robins, and single letters from Jane Addams, Samuel Gompers, Medill McCormick, and Victor Olander.

Reel: 24
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Miscellaneous Material.

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; This final reel of the New York WTUL records begins with a section of clippings (frames 1-224), mostly from New York newspapers. Several groups are mounted in scrapbooks; some clippings are damaged or incomplete. Except for irregularities in the scrapbooks, the clippings are in chronological sequence. They range in date from 1916 to 1954 (plus a 1963 obituary of Mary Dreier) but are mostly too scattered to be of much value. The most substantial group is from 1919; it touches upon such topics-as: the program of protective legislation for women workers drawn up by the Women's Joint Legislative Conference, a state lobbying group of social reform organizations formed under League leadership; opposition to that program voiced at legislative hearings by the Women's League for Equal Opportunity; the appointment of Rose Schneiderman and Mary Anderson to represent the National WTUL at the Peace Conference in Paris; and the International Congress of Working Women held that fall in Washington. Clippings for the 1920's and 1930's are meager except for a group about the New York campaign in 1937-38 for ratification of the federal Child Labor Amendment. Two scrapbooks contain clippings for 1940-41 and 1947, and there are a few for the 1950's.A further scrapbook records the course offerings of the New York League's Educational Department (frames 225-381). Mounted in the scrapbook are annual announcements and occasional other printed or duplicated items dating from 1923 to 1954.The last section of the reel (frames 382-595) consists of notes made in 1938-39 by a member of the WPA Writers' Program, Max Levin, as part of a project to write a history of the New York WTUL. A memorandum of July 1940 by Cara Cook, the League secretary, describes the project and the nature of the notes. Levin read through the League's files of minutes and reports and made notes or "abstracts." From these he planned to write accounts of the League's activities in each of its three main fields of work: legislation, organization, and education. According to Cook, Levin completed only the first topic; his manuscript, "Women Workers and the Law: A Short History of the Legislative Activities of the Women's Trade Union League of New York," was in the League's "clubroom cabinet" in 1940. Only notes for this and the organizational section now seem to survive; they are filmed here.

Reel: 25
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Margaret Dreier Robins Correspondence.



January 1918 - April 1920

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; MDR continues to head the Department of Women and Children in Industry of the Illinois Division of the Woman's Committee, Council of National Defense, during most of 1918, despite a long sojourn in Florida and exasperation over the lack of clear lines of authority. There is considerable correspondence in the first part of the year between MDR and her Illinois superior, Louise de Koven Bowen; see also related matter on Reel 13. A few letters in 1918 from Ethel M. Smith and Mary Anderson report on WTUL activities, but by the fall MDR's interest centers on her plan for a postwar International Congress of Working Women. A number of letters record the planning and successful carrying through of the Congress, which meets in Washington in October 1919, as well as the creation of a continuing office financed and staffed by MDR. This indeed is the general pattern of her labor activities during the first two postwar years, as suggested by her correspondence: an increasing remoteness from the day-to-day affairs of the WTUL and the pursuit of special League projects which she carries out largely on her own, such as organizing work in Virginia or a somewhat vague Educational Department (see letters from Mildred Rankin and Margaret T. Hodgen).In other postwar activities, MDR at the urging of Carrie Chapman Catt heads the Committee on Women in Industry of the League of Women Voters and wins endorsement of a broad reform program from that League's 1920 convention. (See Reel 13 for related material.) In response to a telegraphed appeal from Theodore Roosevelt, MDR in September 1918 accepts membership on the new Republican Women's National Executive Committee; in early 1920 she also joins the party's Committee on Policies and Platform. Letters from Ruth Hanna McCormick, Mary G. Hay, Cornelia Bryce Pinchot, Harriet Taylor Upton, and others touch on these party activities; see also material on Reel 15. While MDR's Republican ties are strengthening, her sister's are weakening. Mary Dreier's letters report her earnest lobbying at Albany in 1919 and 1920 for eight-hour and minimum-wage laws for women, and her embittered response when these are twice blocked by strong-arm tactics on the part of the state's Republican leaders. A further obstacle that she reports -- an emerging feminist opposition to protective legislation -- foreshadows the coming polarization over the Equal Rights Amendment.One persistent thread in this reel is the close relationship between the WTUL and the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor. League members and supporters, so correspondence on this reel suggests, did much to bring about the Bureau's creation (1918) as a wartime agency, to insure its continuation after the war, and to influence the choice of its first two directors, Mary Van Kleeck and Mary Anderson. The appointment of Anderson, a League stalwart, cemented the ties between the Bureau and the League. Her letters to MDR in early 1920 -- the beginning of a regular correspondence that continues through the next quarter-century -- convey a growing mastery of the Washington world of national and bureaucratic politics. Other correspondents on this reel include Agnes Nestor and Maud Swartz of the WTUL, Mary Van Kleeck, Elizabeth Robins, and, in single letters, Edith Abbott, Grace Abbott, Governor Henry J. Allen of Kansas, the English labor leader Margaret Bondfield, Harold Butler of the International Labor Organization, Katharine Bement Davis, John Fitzpatrick, Julia Lathrop, and Rose Schneiderman.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page