Women's Trade Union League and Its Leaders Reel Listing Anderson, Mary



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Reel: 3
Nestor, Agnes.

General Papers and Correspondence.

1919-1933

Collection VII: Agnes Nestor Papers; Though each of the fifteen years on this reel has some representation, the coverage for most is extremely thin. The strongest years are 1919 (which includes two letters from Mary Anderson as Assistant Director of the Women in Industry Service, Department of Labor); 1920 (including mimeographed Proceedings of the Fifth Interstate and City Conference of Women Trade Unionists Called by the Women's Trade Union Leagues of the Middle West); 1923 (with material on Nestor's aid to the mayoralty campaign of William E. Dever, on the Bryn Mawr Summer School, and on her trip to Europe as a delegate to the International Congress of Working Women in Vienna); and 1932 (correspondence concerning her campaign work for Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Democratic candidate for governor, Henry Horner). Correspondents, besides Mary Anderson, include Elisabeth Christman, Ida Glatt, and Margaret Dreier Robins of the WTUL and, more briefly, the English labor leader Margaret Bondfield and Charles R. Crane.



Reel: 3
O'Reilly, Leonora.

Biographical and Personal Material; Letters from Leonora O'Reilly to Her Mother.



Collection V: Leonora O'Reilly Papers; Included on this reel are two segments of the O'Reilly Papers, Series 2 and 3. The first, Biographical and Personal Material, begins with a small group of miscellaneous items (frames 1-41), mostly personal memorabilia. These range from the naturalization certificate of Leonora's father, John O'Reilly (1861), and Leonora's passport for her trip abroad in 1915 to notes on a few of her classes at Pratt Institute in 1899-1900 and a printed announcement of the course on "Problems and Progress of Labor" that she gave at the New School for Social Research in 1925. The group concludes with Mary Dreier's obituary of O'Reilly and her poem of tribute as published in Life and Labor Bulletin, May 1927.The next section of Series 2 (frames 42-113) consists of correspondence and legal documents pertaining to the purchase of O'Reilly's home at 6801 17th Avenue in Brooklyn, and subsequent mortgage and other payments (1909-24). Then follows a group of papers (frames 114-129) concerning the closing of O'Reilly's estate, of which Mary Dreier was executor, assisted by the lawyer Bertha Rembaugh. The series continues with a small group of recollections about O'Reilly sent after her death to Mary Dreier (frames 130-167). The writers include a former shopmate at the Bellamy shirtwaist factory and such long-time friends as Louise Perkins, Harriette Hifton King, Mary Ryshpan Cohen, and Mary S. Wolfe.The next section, made up of material on friends of O'Reilly (frames 168-286), includes items about her postwar protégée from India, Mrs. Parvatibai Athavale (newspaper feature stories and drafts for several of her speeches); Katherine S. Dreier (clippings about her aborted marriage of 1911); Victor Drury (a notebook compiled by O'Reilly of material found in his papers after his death in 1918); Margaret Hinchey, workingwoman and suffragist (five clippings); and brief items pertaining to Louise Perkins and Melinda Scott. The final section of Series 2, Writings by Others (frames 287-335), includes an essay copied by O'Reilly from an unknown source, two handwritten pages on prison labor, apparently sent to O'Reilly as a suggested addition to one of her speeches, and several miscellaneous items.Series 3, which makes up the larger part of the reel (frames 336-805), consists of letters written by Leonora O'Reilly to her mother. Like the diaries, they are scattered in coverage but include some useful material. The first group of letters dates from the summer of 1897 and describes O'Reilly's visits with the family of Bishop Frederic Dan Huntington in Hadley, Massachusetts, and with Louise Perkins at Annisquam, Massachusetts. Subsequent letters touch upon O'Reilly's work at Asacog House (1899 and 1900); visits with Mary Dreier at Stonington, Connecticut (1900, 1903), and with Laura Griesheimer at Rochester, New York (1913, 1914); an effort to organize working women in Augusta, Maine (1911); and, briefly, her attendance at the National WTUL convention of 1913. More substantial are her letters from the steamer Noordam en route to the women's peace congress at The Hague in 1915, and a series of letters she wrote during a stay at Hull House in Chicago in June 1916, including a description of the rain-swept suffrage parade in which she participated. A few letters of 1917-20 complete the reel.

Reel: 3
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Minutes and Reports.

1925-1936

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; The basic coverage of this reel seems to be largely complete, although the individual documents tend to be shorter than in previous years. They follow the same pattern, except that the monthly "report of work" is now sometimes by the president instead of the secretary. Minutes of the annual meeting are sometimes present, sometimes not. There are a few scattered annual reports of officers and reports on particular topics, such as legislation and education.Legislation remains the uppermost concern, with considerable material on the League's efforts in Albany to secure minimum-wage and eight-hour laws. At the same time, there is evidence of increased attention to organizing: a 6-page report on this topic by Rose Schneiderman (1925); minutes and a report from an organization committee (December 1925) that leads to the appointment of Sadie Reisch as organizer. Her monthly reports, beginning in April 1926 and continuing, with some interruptions, for most of the following decade, are full and informative. There is substantial material on the League's efforts throughout the late 1920's and 1930's to organize a stable union of laundry workers, a goal finally achieved in the mid-thirties when a League-organized union becomes affiliated with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America.The League's educational program expands during the depression years; monthly reports of the education director begin in 1934. A further response to the depression is concern for the unemployed, as seen in Mary Dreier's report on the "Unemployment Problem" (1933), a 34-page memorandum and a special conference on work relief for women (both in 1935), and a report on the League's "Rest Room for Unemployed Women Workers" (1936). Other documents deal with the League's financial affairs and the management of its clubhouse-headquarters.



Reel: 3
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Biographical and Personal Material -- Margaret Dreier Robins (Death, Letters of Sympathy, Memorial Services).

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; This reel consists of material on the death of MDR. It begins with a small group of death notices and obituaries (frames 1-23), representing the Florida, New York, and labor press. The bulk of the reel (frames 24-699) is devoted to letters and telegrams of sympathy sent to Raymond Robins, Mary Dreier, and Edward Dreier. Among them are warm tributes from Louise de Koven Bowen of Hull House, Senator Arthur Capper of Kansas, Carrie Chapman Catt, the Australian novelist Stella Franklin, formerly secretary of the NWTUL, Harold Ickes, Harriet B. Laidlaw, William Draper Lewis, Catharine Waugh McCulloch, Mary Van Kleeck, and such labor associates as Agnes Nestor, Pauline Newman, Mollie Dowd, Anton Johannsen of the Chicago Federation of Labor, and Samuel Levin and Jacob Potofsky of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers. Accounts of memorial services in Chicago and Washington (frames 700-712) conclude the reel.

Reel: 3
Anderson, Mary.

Correspondence and Papers on Special Topics; Biographical and Personal Material.



Collection III: Mary Anderson Papers; This final reel of the Anderson Papers consists of two segments. The first, Correspondence and Papers on Special Topics, is divided into six sections, as follows:1. International Federation of Working Women (frames 1-187). Apart from two earlier items, the material concerns the Federation's congress of 1923, to which Anderson was a delegate, and the IFWW's merger in 1925 into the International Federation of Trade Unions. Included are copies of official correspondence of the secretariat, 1923-25, a few printed leaflets and reports, and a typed report of the 1923 congress by Ethel M. Smith of the WTUL.2. Accusations of Radicalism (frames 188-395). This section consists of correspondence, plus some clippings and pamphlets, relating mainly to two episodes: the publication of a pair of articles in Henry Ford's Dearborn Independent in March 1924 alleging vast radical influence upon American women's organizations and including the statement that Anderson had had the federal government print a "program of Women's and Children's Work" that was "identical with" one proposed by "the director of welfare in Soviet Russia"; and the circulation within the Daughters of the American Revolution of a "blacklist" of alleged radicals in which Anderson was listed as a "socialist." (See Reel 1 for a related episode in 1927.)3. Travel Authorizations, World War II (frames 396-437). These official forms provide a log of Anderson's wartime trips and their purposes.4. Wartime Correspondence with a Relative, Kenneth Kittelson (frames 438-479). Contains both sides of Anderson's correspondence with a young serviceman, 1942-43.5. Christening of the S.S. Anna Howard Shaw (frames 480-620). The extensive correspondence here reflects the interest Anderson took in this event of 1943. It was she who suggested the naming of a Liberty Ship after the noted suffragist, who had headed the Woman's Committee of the Council of National Defense in World War I, and she who performed the christening. Among the correspondents in this section are Lucy E. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt, and Maud Wood Park.6. Hannah Harrison School of Industrial Arts (frames 621-663). Minutes and reports of the planning committee, of which Anderson was an active member, for a vocational school for women. The school, organized under the auspices of the Washington, D.C., YWCA, opened in 1950.The second segment, Biographical and Personal Material, has the following subdivisions:1. Articles about Mary Anderson (frames 664-721). Mostly clippings and publicity releases, these range from a biographical article in the Ladies Home Journal of August 1920 through a typed account by a Women's Bureau staff member, Mary V. Robinson, written originally for the Railway Conductor of Jan. 11, 1940, and revised in June 1944. The section includes a long list of persons recommending Anderson for the Pictorial Review's annual award of 1930, with excerpts from their letters of support.2. Articles and Addresses by Mary Anderson (frames 722-818). These are mostly published items, including several contributed to the American Federationist, organ of the AF of L. Her defense of labor laws for women (1927) was published by Good Housekeeping along with an opposing article by Rheta Childe Dorr. A 20-page typescript marked "War History" seems to be a partial transcript of dictated recollections by Anderson of the Bureau's work in World War II. It includes frank comments about her conflicts with Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins and with Clara M. Beyer of the Labor Department's Division of Labor Standards. The typescript bears signs of extensive penciled changes, subsequently erased.3. Autobiography (frames 819-839B). This small section contains several letters about Anderson's autobiography, including two long, enthusiastic, and reminiscent ones from the journalist Anne Hard, and clippings of reviews. More material about the autobiography can be found in the papers of Anderson's collaborator, Mary Winslow, in the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College.4. Material on Friends of Mary Anderson (frames 840-871). Miscellaneous clippings and memoirs, including several items about Mary Winslow and a printed report of the Chicago WTUL's memorial services for Margaret Dreier Robins.5. Miscellaneous Memorabilia (frames 872-913). Includes a World War I identification badge, a police identity book for a sojourn in England in 1919, and a passport of 1923.

Reel: 4
National Women's Trade Union League Papers (Schlesinger Library).

Subject Files -- Strikes through World War I.



Collection II: National Women's Trade Union League Papers, Schlesinger Library; Files on particular strikes make up the first half of this reel. For most, only a few items are present, but there are two exceptions. One, coming at the start of the reel, is the strike of garment workers in the men's clothing industry of Chicago in 1910-11, a strike in which the Chicago WTUL and Margaret Dreier Robins played an integral part. The file is divided into five subgroups: background material on working conditions and union policies; contemporary documents on the course of the strike; material on the settlement negotiations and on the strike as a whole, including the Chicago WTUL's 60-page Official Report of the Strike Committee (1911); strike relief records; and a small group of miscellany. Although far from comprehensive in coverage, the documents include statements by striking women workers, minutes of meetings of the WTUL strike committee and of the Joint Conference Committee on the strike, extensive typed excerpts from minutes of the Chicago Federation of Labor, printed reports of two citizens' groups and of a state legislative committee, appeals for public support, texts of several proposed settlement agreements, and material on the League-operated strike relief program.A folder follows on other strikes in the garment industry, 1909-33. The New York shirtwaist makers' strike of 1909-10 is represented by a typed account of the strike's early weeks, a letter by Helen Marot of the New York WTUL to the police commissioner protesting police action against pickets, and the New York League's pamphlet, Souvenir History of the Strike. Material on two Chicago strikes of 1915 includes a report by Mary Anderson as organizer for the Chicago WTUL and a citizens' appeal, by Jane Addams and others, for arbitration. At the end of the section, an undated appeal by the New York WTUL for aid to a strike in Brownsville, N.Y., issued during the secretaryship of Gertrude Barnum, must date from 1905 or 1906.Of the other folders on strikes, a few touch upon WTUL activity, usually in the form of publicity. Material on the strike of fluorspar miners in Rosiclare, III. (1916), consists of reports by a visiting NWTUL committee that included Mary Anderson and by a representative of the Federal Council of Churches. On two occasions the New York WTUL sent its organizer, Sadie Reisch. Her aid to striking women cigarmakers in New Brunswick, N.J. (1929), earned a warm letter of appreciation from the president of the local union but no mention of the WTUL in his report of the strike in the cigarmakers' journal. Items on an Iowa buttonworkers' strike of 1911 include an article by Pauline Newman of the WTUL, who probably also wrote the typed report on the Kalamazoo corset workers' strike of 1912.The only other strike with substantial documentation is another in which the League was directly involved, the textile strike in Danville, Va., in 1930-31. The file here contains contemporary documents, clippings, and photographs, including several reports by Matilda Lindsay, vice president of the National WTUL, who with Francis J. Gorman of the United Textile Workers led the strike, and the typed text of a speech to the strikers by the author Sherwood Anderson. Further information about the strike, and particularly about its settlement, can be found in letters by Elisabeth Christman and others in the Margaret Dreier Robins Papers (Reels 34 and 35).Among the remaining files, one on Sweatshops deals chiefly with the revival of this form of labor exploitation during the depression years of 1932-33 and with the mobilization of public opinion against it. Included are clippings from national magazines and from Kansas City, Mo., where the local WTUL conducted an effective publicity campaign. A file on Trade Unions and Trade Unionism includes a mimeographed essay by Alice Henry and pamphlets published by the National and Boston Leagues and by outside organizations. (For some non-WTUL pamphlets, here and later on the reel, only the cover and contents pages have been filmed.) A folder on the United Textile Workers contains material also on the CIO-sponsored Textile Workers' Organizing Committee of the 1930's. A file on Women in Trade Unions contains several NWTUL pamphlets, a mimeographed report of a Women's Bureau conference in 1945 ("Women Labor Leaders Speak"), and a variety of other printed matter, including several articles by Fannia M. Cohn. A final folder on World War I contains two NWTUL committee reports in pamphlet form, Report of Committee on Women's Work in Wartime (1917) and Women and Reconstruction (1918).

Reel: 4
Nestor, Agnes.

General Papers and Correspondence.

1934-1943

Collection VII: Agnes Nestor Papers; Within this reel is a good deal of correspondence pertaining to the International Glove Workers Union, much of it between Agnes Nestor and the national officers, Thomas Durian and Anton White. An interchange with President William Green of the AF of L in February 1941 reflects the union's weak state and its efforts to stave off encroachments by the Amalgamated Clothing Workers. There is some material on the Women's Trade Union League, including mimeographed reports of the Chicago WTUL (1936, 1940, 1941, 1942), of a Midwestern Interstate Conference (1940), and of an Illinois legislative conference (1941). An undated letter of 1936 by Nestor to Margaret Dreier Robins expresses her feelings about three decades of organizing work among women. Other correspondents include Elisabeth Christman and, in scattered letters, Mary Anderson and Charles R. Crane.



Reel: 4
O'Reilly, Leonora.

General Correspondence.



1886-1909

Collection V: Leonora O'Reilly Papers; This reel and the four that follow contain the general correspondence of Leonora O'Reilly, comprising Series 4 of her papers. The correspondence begins in 1886, when she was sixteen, but letters for this and the next fifteen years are fairly sparse. They come mostly from a few special friends: John Baptiste Hubert, machinist, member of the Knights of Labor, close family friend and mentor (see letters of 1886-90); Edward King, New York labor leader, reformer, and Positivist (1887-89, 1894-95); "Marie Louise," Positivist and individualist anarchist (1888-89); and especially O'Reilly's longtime friend and benefactor, Louise S.W. Perkins of Concord, Massachusetts, who writes as early as 1888 and in nearly every year from 1892 until O'Reilly's death. Hubert's letters of 1886 indicate that it was he who brought O'Reilly into the Knights of Labor. King's letters reflect his role as one of her intellectual guides.The letters on this reel from Louise Perkins touch upon the financial support she arranged -- from herself, Lillian Wald, Josephine Shaw Lowell, and others -- that enabled O'Reilly to give up her factory job in 1897 and begin her broader work as labor reformer. Her new work was at first based at Miss Wald's Nurses' (Henry Street) Settlement. There are references to the experimental cooperative shirtwaist shop O'Reilly conducted there and to her organizing, with Lavinia Dock and others, a women's local of the United Garment Workers (1897); the papers include a personal letter from Wald in 1897. In letters of 1898-99 Perkins conveys her personal and financial support of O'Reilly's decision to give up the shop and enroll at Pratt Institute.The correspondence of 1902 has material about the founding of the Manhattan Trade School for Girls, with which O'Reilly was to be associated for the next seven years. (See letters from Sarah S. Ollesheimer, Virginia Potter, and especially Mary S. Woolman.) Meanwhile her circle of correspondents broadens. Beginning in 1899, there are occasional letters from working girls, at her shop or elsewhere. A new friend of 1900, Elizabeth H. Thomas, gives up settlement-house work in the East to become a loyal lieutenant in the Socialist party of Milwaukee, and over the next decade sends back reports of its increasingly successful political campaigns.The Women's Trade Union League first enters the correspondence in December 1903 in a letter from William English Walling. O'Reilly's notes on the back of the letter give clear expression to her concept of how the League should operate. (For other letters from Walling to O'Reilly, 1903-05, see the Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, Reel 66, frames 863-891.) There are letters in 1905-06 between O'Reilly and Gertrude Barnum, particularly about O'Reilly's temporary resignation from the League, and occasional letters in 1907-09 from Helen Marot, Melinda Scott, and others of the New York League, as well as two (1909) from Mabel Gillespie of Boston. Letters from Mary Dreier (1904-09) reflect both League affairs and personal friendship; a letter addressed to "Mother O'Reilly" (Jan. 16, 1908) records the beginning of Dreier's financial support of Leonora. There are several letters also from Katherine Dreier and two from Margaret Dreier (1903, 1905). Letters in 1908-09 from Arthur Brisbane of the New York Journal show his early assistance to O'Reilly's labor and League work.The correspondence for the last year on the reel, 1909, reflects O'Reilly's continuing interest in labor organization and in the Manhattan Trade School for Girls and the beginning of two new interests: woman suffrage and the cause of Negro rights. Her participation in the latter cause is seen in letters from William English Walling and Madeleine Z. Doty. See also her diary entry for May 31, 1909 (Reel 1, Volume 16), for a long account of the National Negro Conference she attended, and related material on Reel 11, frames 176-227. O'Reilly during this year is increasingly called upon as a public speaker, particularly by middle-class groups like the Consumers' League and the YWCA. Her sharp reactions to the unconsciously patronizing assumptions of middle-class reformers sometimes ruffled a few feathers (see, e.g., her correspondence in 1909 with Paul and Arthur Kellogg of the Survey), but her role as interpreter of labor's needs to middle-class audiences would remain a vital one.Besides correspondents already mentioned, the reel includes one or more letters from Annie Winsor Allen (1908), Victor Berger (1907), Grace Dodge (1904, 1908), Maud Nathan (1907), Elizabeth Robins, Anna Howard Shaw, and Mary Van Kleeck (all 1908). A letter from Josephine Shaw Lowell in 1902 comments on the anthracite coal strike and favors nationalizing the mines.

Reel: 4
Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League.

Minutes and Reports.

1937-1947

Collection IV: Records of the New York Women's Trade Union League; In terms of paperwork at least, the New York WTUL reached its peak in the years 1937-38. Besides records of the general and executive board meetings and the secretary's monthly reports, there is a proliferation of other documents: monthly reports by one or more of the League's organizers, and minutes of a variety of seemingly active committees -- the Legislative Committee, which in these two years often met three times a month; the Education Committee, supervising the League's program of classes; the Organization Committee; the Social Committee, which planned recreational functions; and the Trade Union Finance Committee, which visited unions to solicit funds for the League. In 1939 annual budget and expenditure figures are added, but otherwise the documents begin to grow fewer and more perfunctory, reflecting the League's declining vitality. The secretary's reports disappear after 1940, organizer's reports fade out in 1940-41, and the last few committee minutes turn up in 1942. Thereafter only minutes of the basic monthly meetings remain.



Reel: 4
Robins, Margaret Dreier.

Biographical and Personal Material -- Mary Dreier's Biography of Margaret Dreier Robins.

Collection I: Margaret Dreier Robins Papers, University of Florida Libraries; The Margaret Dreier Robins collection contains three separate typescripts of Mary Dreier's biography of her sister. The first, which is microfilmed here (frames 1-551), is probably a carbon of the original typescript that was sent to prospective publishers. It is arranged by years or groups of years, rather than by chapters, and embodies extensive quotations from letters and other documents. Neither of the two other typescripts has been filmed. The second is essentially the same as the first, with some penciled changes and some passages revised and retyped; the third closely approximates the published work. A preliminary version of chapters 1 and 2 that does not seem to be part of any one of the typescripts has also been filmed (frames 552-581). With the typescripts is a partial file of Mary Dreier's correspondence, 1946-55, pertaining to the writing and particularly the editing of the biography (frames 582-905). Additional correspondence is in the Mary Dreier Papers at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College.

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