Women, Gender and Sexuality Course Offerings Spring 2013



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Women, Gender and Sexuality

Course Offerings

Spring 2013

WGS 2100 - Introduction to Gender Studies
Amanda Davis

TR 9:30 am - 10:45 am

TR 11:00am - 12:15 pm
An introduction to gender studies, including the fields of women’s studies, feminist studies, LGBT studies, & masculinity studies. Students will examine historical movements, theoretical issues, & contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to issues of inequality & to the intersection of gender with race, class, sexuality, & nationalism. Topics will vary according to the interdisciplinary expertise & research focus of the instructor. Prerequisite for WGS majors and minors.
WGS 2559 - Body Activism Using Social Media (1 Credit)

Karlin Luedtke and Amy Chestnutt

M 3:30 - 4:45pm

As a culture, how to we define and communicate messages about health and body image? America’s obsession with weight is often not really about health. Instead our definitions and descriptions are more related to an unattainable beauty ideal. In this class we will explore the following topics: 1) definitions of optimal health; 2) understandings of cultural constructions of health, beauty, fitness, and our obsession to be thin; 3) media and advertising literacy focused on these ideals; and 4) the application of health promotion and social marketing principles to conduct body activism via social media (i.e. Facebook, Twitter).

 

WGS 2892 - Issues Facing Adolescent Girls II (1 Credit)


Edith Lawrence

Combined with EDHS 2892

M 5:00 – 6:00 pm


This one-credit course is a continuation of the fall class and provides an opportunity for students to continue to develop their leadership skills through involvement in YWLP and academic service learning. In addition to the weekly one-hour class time (Big Sister meeting) students are required to continue as active participants in their two-hour-a-week mentoring group and four-hour-a-month one-on-one time with their mentee. For those not able to mentor, they can meet the class requirements by being involved in the YWLP research team. Research activities can include: collecting research data from participants, data entry and analyses, and assisting in grant writing or conference presentations.

 

WGS 3130 - Geographies of Desire


Kendra Hamilton

R 3:30 - 6:00 pm
Women, the gender most associated with notions of "home," face in the 21st century a situation in which "the local" seems increasingly embattled, both by individual social mobility and by the vast migrations of labor and capital that connect and disrupt the lives of all modern subjects. This course, thus, asks that we consider seriously the role of place, refracted through the lenses of race and gender, in the construction of contemporary identities. The work of feminist geographers will frame our discussions as we consider readings and case studies largely drawn from the U.S. South and the "global South" (the term by which Africa, the central and southern Americas, and much of Asia has come to be known). We'll learn to apply techniques geographic mapping across cultural, temporal, and even literary-visual boundaries as we explore the imaginary landscapes of novels and paintings and the familiar landscapes of work, home, the department store cosmetic counter, and even the physical body to give students the tools to deconstruct both broadly cultural and inherited personal geographies of desire. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.

 

WGS 3306 - Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in Teen Film


Andrea Press

Combined with MDST 3306 and SOC 3306

MW 3:30 - 4:45 pm
The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

 

WGS 3501 - YWLP: Women's Leadership and Technology II


Edith Lawrence

Combined with EDHS 3500

M 5:15 - 6:00 pm
While serving as a mentor to a middle school girl in the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs area girls with college women for a year, students will participate in a weekly group that focuses on developing leadership projects using engaging dynamic media programs, such as digital storytelling. In addition, students will reflect upon and evaluate their own leadership styles throughout the course.

 

WGS 3559-1 - Intersectionality and Women


Lisa Speidel

WF 2:00 - 3:15 pm
The purpose of this course is to engage students in critical thought and discussion through cross-cultural perspectives on women and the meaning of sexism, with an emphasis on intersectionality. The theory of intersectionality focuses on the concept that different forms of systemic oppression do not exist independent of one another.  Students will have the opportunity to analyze the multiple dimensions of sexism, including how racism and classism interact with sexism to manifest  inequalities for women  in society. This course is grounded in the mission of raising awareness through scholarship and discussion, while developing the mindset and tools necessary for students to become allies in the movement to end sexism. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.

 

WGS 3559-2 - Transformative Feminism(s)


Loren Intolubbe-Chmil

TR 9:30 - 10:45 am
This course will explore the diverse landscape of feminism, critically reflecting on how feminism takes shape in local/global contexts and how feminist rhetoric is cultivated through particular spheres of influence.  As active participants in this course, we will challenge frames of reference about the nature of feminism and what it means to be a feminist. Emphasis will be placed on indigenous perspectives, ecofeminism, and ‘village’ feminism, which have been historically marginalized in prominent feminist discourse. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.
WGS 3559-3 - Women and Architecture
Jacqueline Taylor

TR 12:30 - 1:45 pm
Architecture is ubiquitous; we live, work, and play in it. But what happens to our understanding of architecture when we couple it with ‘women’? Is architecture gender neutral or are we inclined to think of it as male? Through the lenses of race and gender we will examine women’s relationship to architecture - as designers, patrons, and users – in the public and the private realm, and across a broad range of temporal and geographic boundaries.

Fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

WGS 3559-4 - Women in the Cold War
Bonnie Hagerman

TR 9:30 - 10:45 am
This course challenges the stereotype that American women during the Cold War era were mostly stay-at-home suburban moms, clad in pearls and heels, who loved their families, their houses, and their Hoover vacuums. Students will explore American women’s participation in various movements such as the Civil Rights struggle, the fight for world peace, and the second wave of the women’s rights movement while considering whether the efforts of female activists during this time pale in comparison to the accomplishments of their World War II mothers because of “domestic containment.” Readings will include selections from, among other texts, The Feminine Mystique, Women Strike for Peace, Homeward Bound, and Not June Cleaver.

Fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

WGS 3559-5 - Sexuality in Sports
Bonnie Hagerman

TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
This course will explore sexuality and sport from both male and female perspectives. Students will explore a number of important issues such as homophobia, celebrity, and fashion being mindful of the complex interactions of race, class, and gender and will consider how representations of these issues vary according to the type of medium, especially in film, newspapers, magazines, and full-length texts.   Readings will include selections from, among other texts, The Metrosexual, Coming on Strong, Sportsex, and Strong Women, Deep Closets.

 

WGS 3559-6 – Gender/Sexuality – Fashion/Film


D. Verena Kollig

Combined with GETR 3500

MW 5:00 - 6:15 pm
This course considers the relationship between fashion, media and gender and sexuality. It pays particular attention to the relationship between how gender and identity are represented (and challenged) in fashion and film. 
 

WGS 3612 – History of Women in America, 1865-Present
Cori Field

MW 12:00 - 12:50 pm
This course will explore the significance of gender in United States from the Civil War to the present.  We will ask how people’s ideas about gender structured society and how social relations defined what it meant to be a man or a woman.  Readings and discussion will focus on three particular areas of inquiry: the rights and obligations of citizenship; the value and division of labor; and the configuration of emotional life (including familial relationships, erotic desires, and individual aspirations).  Resisting any transhistorical definition of womanhood, we will investigate how understandings of gender developed in relation to racial, ethnic, class, and regional differences. 
The goal of this course is to become adept at generating your own historical analysis through the study of primary documents.  The majority of the readings consist of primary sources—letters, diaries, legal documents, and fiction written by or about women in the past.  In addition, you will read a few secondary sources in order to assess how professional historians analyze and employ evidence.  Through short weekly writing assignments and class discussion, you will use these readings to develop your own analytical skills.  Lectures will introduce topics not covered in the readings.  A midterm, a final exam, and a longer (five page) paper will require you to synthesize the readings, lectures, and discussion in order to generate your own arguments about the significance of gender in the American past. Fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

WGS 3800 - Queer Theory


Geeta Patel

T 2:00 - 4:30 pm
This course introduces students to some of the key and some of the controversial theoretical texts that make up the emerging field of queer theory.  We will consider the beginnings of queer theory and also look at more recent work in fields such as queer gothic and phenomenology. The approach of the course will be interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on literary and aesthetic criticisms that may shift according the instructor's areas of expertise. The goal of the course is to develop critical practice by working through a variety of perspectives, not only across academic disciplines but also across cultures. Insofar as queer theory reads for the often unseen, or submerged, reality embedded in cultural texts, contexts, and literatures, we will engage conscious critical practice in the class:  active reading and informed discussion. 

 

WGS 3810 - Feminist Theory


Karlin Luedtke

TR 2:00 - 3:15 pm
This course provides an overview of the historical bases and contemporary developments in feminist theorizing and analyze a range of theories on gender, including liberal, Marxist, radical, difference, and postmodernist feminist theories. We will explore how feminist theories apply to contemporary debates on the body, sexuality, colonialism, globalization and transnationalism. Throughout the course we will incorporate analysis of race, class, and national differences as well as cross-cultural perspectives. Required for all WGS majors and minors.

Fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

WGS 3993 - Independent Study

 

WGS 4050 - Senior Seminar


Denise Walsh

TR 11:00 am – 12:15 pm
This course begins by exploring the modern roots of the culture versus women's rights debate, tracing its historical evolution through the international women’s movement.  We then examine a number of culture-rights controversies in different societies, assess potential solutions to the debate, and conclude with a discussion of how the contemporary transnational women’s movement is grappling with the problem. 

Fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

WGS 4200 - Sex and Gender Go To The Movies
Andrea Press

MW 2:00 - 3:15 pm
Over the past several generations, the mass media have become central to our understanding of the meaning of the categories of "woman" and "man" in American life.  In fact, many argue that the mass media have become central to the reproduction of the "sex-gender system" within which we all live, and under whose influence we form our identities as men and women in this culture.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which popular Hollywood film helps to define cultural ideas about gender differences both in the U.S. and globally.  We will also look at the ways in which feminists have responded to these definitions, by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own.

The course will begin by examining the notion that film might influence our development as gendered individuals, looking at those who have argued both for and against this notion.  We will then consider briefly the different forms of feminist theory which exist, and how they have been applied to the study of the mass media.  This introduction will be followed by an examination of the development of images of women and men in film, and an examination of how these images might function for different segments of the female audience.  We will look briefly at the history of popular Hollywood film, the history of its portrayal of women, scholarly criticisms of these portrayals, scholarly discussions of the appeal of specifically "female" genres such as  melodramas or "the woman's film" to the female audience, and of "masculine" films and feminist attempts to create alternatives to mainstream images in various media.  Throughout the course we will consider the issue of the representation of minorities in the dominant media, and examine some newly created alternative representations.

 

WGS 4999 - Senior Thesis II
AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES
AAS 3000 – Women and Religion in Africa (Primary)

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

Combined with RELA 3000

This seminar examines women’s religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts.  Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa.  Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women’s agency in indigenous religious movements, Muslim communities and Christian congregations in Africa. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


AAS 3500 – Women Writing Africa (Primary)

Barbara Boswell

This survey course serves as an introduction to the literature, in English, of African women writers. It aims to situate African women’s literary production within the political and historical contexts in which these works are produced, and broadly examine the issues selected African women writers have chosen to highlight in their fiction. Particular attention will be paid to constructions and critiques of gender relations within each text. Examining the novels of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, Buchi Emecheta, Sindiwe Magona, Mariama Bâ, Tsitsi Dangarembga, and Chimamanda Adichie, the course focuses on ways in which the authors engage with national, patriarchal, and post-colonial structures in different African societies. Practicing close critical readings of these novels, we will explore questions of canonicity, post-colonial identity, motherhood, and gender relations in various African locations. Students will also engage African/feminist literary criticism and its responses to these writers work, while also considering how their novels function as literary, postcolonial, critical race, and feminist theory.

ART HISTORY
ARTH 3559 – Women’s Photo & Aesthetics (Primary)

Claire Raymond

Survey the work of a range of women photographers, moving from the nineteenth into the twenty first century. Some of the photographers covered are Julia Margaret Cameron, Claude Cahun, Diane Arbus, Francesca Woodman, Carrie Mae Weems. With each photographer we look at cultural/historical factors in the production of her art, and also focus on the aesthetics of her work. The question that the course mobilizes is whether there can be such a thing as a feminist aesthetics and, if so, how we see this aesthetic functioning in the works of individual photographers.


ARTH 4591 – Gender and Medieval Art (Primary)

Eric Ramirez-Weaver

Medieval sexuality and identity were linked to ideological and theological distinctions, which do not always reflect contemporary categories of biological and sexual difference. Through critical examinations of artworks from the fifth to the fifteenth centuries, medieval texts, and modern theoretical treatises, this course reexamines medieval costume, education, reproductive medicine, patterns of collecting, social codes like feudalism or chivalry, and mystic spirituality. In this course, we will interrogate the use and meaning of the term gender in various contexts with great rigor. Rather than merely distinguishing between the biological sexes, the term gender provides a critical apparatus which will enable us to understand better the cultural identity of early to late medieval men and women. In particular, we will use gender as a way to nuance hegemonic, medieval Christian interpretations of conceptual binaries such as masculinity/femininity, heterosexuality/ homosexuality, celibacy/marriage, and humanity/divinity. Topics discussed in this course include: the early medieval belief in the need to share seminal scripture, gendered examinations of the roles of women at medieval courts, the writings of intellectual giants such as Hildegard of Bingen or Christine de Pizan, legal texts describing sexuality and punishment, gendered accounts of the medieval collecting practices of Duke Jean of Berry, and the maternal traits of God in medieval texts and images.

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 3129 - Marriage, Mortality and Fertility (Adjunct)

John Shepherd

This course explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures. Topics to be discussed will include (1) disease history, the impact of epidemics and famine, the differential impact of morality gender, age, and class, and the impact of improved nutrition and modern medicine; (2) marriage strategies and alternatives, the problem of unbalanced sex ratios at marriageable age, systems of polygamy and polyandry, divorce, widowhood and remarriage; (3) fertility decision –making, premodern methods of birth control and spacing, infanticide; and (4) migration, regional systems, and variation through time and space in the structure of populations. ANTH 101 or equivalent recommended as background. This is an advanced course, adding to general offerings in social organization, kinship, marriage, and gender. Fulfills the second writing requirement.

CLASSICS
CLAS 3040 – Women and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome (Primary)

Sara Myers

This course focuses on women’s roles and lives in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students are introduced to the primary material(textual and material) on women in antiquity and to current debates about it. Subjects addressed will include sexual stereotypes and ideals, power-relations of gender, familial roles, social and economic status, social and political history, visual art, medical theory, and religion.

DRAMA
DRAM 2080 – Circus in America (Adjunct)

Lavahn Hoh

As a form of popular entertainment, the importance of the circus in the nineteenth and twentieth century in America cannot be understated. The circus was a primary form of entertainment and information for nineteenth century Americans, especially for those outside the larger metropolitan areas. It gave audiences opportunities to experience natural wonders from exotic and unexplored lands and witness marvels of technology, such as the automobile and the airplane. The demand was such that by the beginning of the twentieth century, there were more than one hundred circuses traveling the country and routinely entertaining as many as 12,000 spectators at each show


The course will look at historical precedents throughout the world that have shaped the American circus. The course will also focus on the growth, decline, and cultural influences of the circus on America.

EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES & CULTURES


JPTR 3020/5020 – Survey of Modern Japanese Literature: The Canon and Beyond (Primary)

Michiko Wilson

A gateway to the rich, diverse modern Japanese literary tradition, from the early 1900s to the present, this course adopts socio-cultural and gender perspectives in the context of world literature. It focuses on the writers’ obsessive questioning of self-identity, sexuality, the image of the “eternal woman,” the conflict of giri/ninjo (societal obligations vs. human emotions), communing with nature, and family and gender relationship. Readings include works by Sôseki Natsume (1867-1916), the first modern writer to delve into the human psyche; Ôgai Mori (1862-1922), the surgeon-turned writer; Ryûnosuke Akutagawa (1892-1927)—Japan’s O Henry; Junichiro Tanizaki (1886-1965), a master of eroticism and classical Japanese aestheticism.  Also included: Naoya Shiga (1883-1971)—the "god" of the autobiographical fiction; Shûsaku Endo (1923-), Japan’s foremost Christian writer; two Nobel laureates, Yasunari Kawabata (1899-1972) and Kenzaburo Ôe (1935-); Harumi Murakami—the suave, urbane writer of the new generation; Minako Ôba—the consummate writer on human psychology; and Banana Yoshimoto—the healer of the heart. This course fulfills both the second writing requirement and the WGS global perspectives requirement.


EDUCATION


EDHS 2892/5892 – Issues Facing Adolescent Girls II (Primary)

Edith “Winx” Lawrence

Combined with WGS 2892

This one-credit course is a continuation of the fall class and provides an opportunity for students to continue to develop their leadership skills through involvement in YWLP and academic service learning. In addition to the weekly one-hour class time (Big Sister meeting) students are required to continue as active participants in their two-hour-a-week mentoring group and four-hour-a-month one-on-one time with their mentee. For those not able to mentor, they can meet the class requirements by being involved in the YWLP research team. Research activities can include: collecting research data from participants, data entry and analyses, and assisting in grant writing or conference presentations.

EDHS 3500 – YWLP: Women’s Leadership and Technology II (Primary)

Edith “Winx” Lawrence

Combined with WGS 3500

While serving as a mentor to a middle school girl in the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs area girls with college women for a year, students will participate in a weekly group that focuses on developing leadership projects using engaging dynamic media programs, such as digital storytelling. In addition, students will reflect upon and evaluate their own leadership styles throughout the course.


EDLF 5500 – Women, Peace and Justice (Primary)

Jennifer Merritt

This course will attempt to provide a systematic analysis of poverty as it impacts women and children and examine the ways that poverty intersects with women’s access to human rights, education, health care, sustainable development and the realization of their individual and collective potential. We will begin with philosophical analyses of social justice and women’s agency in relation to creating social change. We will then examine the broad underpinnings of global poverty and gender in light of past and current social conditions and in relation to specific cases associated with countries in both the developed and developing worlds such as; Haiti, India, Kenya, El Salvador, Cameroon and the US.

Through the lenses of politics, philosophy, sociology, education, public health, economics, history and anthropology, we will together seek to gain understanding of contemporary issues and processes imbedded in the poverty-society relationship and discern their impact on women and children. Additionally, we will explore the unique accomplishments of people who have created programs and relationships that combat global poverty, particularly those who have acted in solidarity with women experiencing poverty and injustice. We will also consider the way that microcredit organizations and other forms of social enterprise address issues of injustice for women. This course fulfills the WGS global perspectives requirement.
EDLF 5500 – Gender Violence (Primary)

Claire Kaplan and Mary Carter Lominack

This course introduces students to the roots of gender-based violence, the political and cultural structures that perpetuate it, and explores approaches to changing those structures in order to reduce or end it.  Students will develop the skills to think critically about the local and global impact of gendered violence, how it intersects with other forms of oppression, the forms of legislative and grassroots responses to violence (including local resources), and develop an understanding of these issues that will be useful for academics and activists.


ENGLISH
ENEC 3200 – 18th Century Women Writers (Primary)

Alison Hurley

Technological, social, and economic shifts resulted in new ways in which texts were produced, circulated, and consumed during the eighteenth century. The new “print culture” that resulted provided women with the opportunity to step fully onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Women, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere and responded by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. Because this class is particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre during the eighteenth century our investigations will focus on the ways in which women writers appropriate a number of specific literary genres (conduct literature, plays, poetry and novels) to the female pen. Class requirements include weekly writing assignments and quizzes, two longer essays and a final exam. Our class meeting will be largely discussion based.


ENLT 2552 – Women in Literature: Women’s Life Writing (Primary)

Jean Franzino
ENLT 2552 – Women in Literature: Beauty and the Beast (Primary)

Holly Bell
ENLT 2552 – Women in Literature: Writing Women’s Lives (Primary)

Deandra Little
ENSP 2559 – Women and Media in the Middle East & South Asia (Primary)

Lisa Goff

Combined with MESA 2350

Women in the Middle East have figured prominently in media accounts of the Arab Spring, and have proved themselves particularly adept at using social media outlets such as Twitter, Facebook, and blogs to promote their dual message of political reform and women's rights. Similarly, women in South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to women in the region. This course will examine media depictions of women during and after revolutions and uprisings in five selected countries (Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan), and explore how women in those countries have used social media to embrace, rebut, or amplify those depictions. It will pay special attention to the ways in which social media facilitate, or possibly limit, women’s roles as producers and creators of culture. A wave of post-Arab Spring literature, films, etc. from across the region has just started to break. The readings in this course will reflect this flood of new material, but will also look back to earlier revolutions and uprisings, including those that overthrew colonial rulers, in order to compare pre- and post-revolutionary depictions of women in media. One aim of the class will be to examine the ways that politicians and religious leaders have historically used women’s bodies to define pro- and anti-revolutionary forces, as well as nationhood. How are women now, with the tools of social media at their command, (re)defining themselves? The course will address themes of mobility and public space, and will examine the multiple ways in which women in the region have both fueled revolutions and been affected by them. Finally, the course will address the current backlash against women in these regions, and the ways in which women remain divided on issues of how best to achieve, and even to define, their own empowerment. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


GERMAN
GETR 3500- Gender,/Sexuality – Fashion /Film (Primary)

D. Verena Kollig

Combined with WGS 3559-6 and MDST 3559

This course considers the relationship between fashion, media and gender and sexuality. It pays particular attention to the relationship between how gender and identity are represented (and challenged) in fashion and film. 


HISTORY
HISA 3121 – History of Women in South Asia (Primary)

Richard Barnett

This course addresses women’s roles and statuses, means of gaining and using power, and contributions in political and other realms, during four millennia of South Asian history.  With emphasis on the modern, but with relevant background in Indian mythology, classical history and literature, medieval Islamic chronicles, autobiographies, and eyewitness accounts, we will examine original sources, social science studies, fictional works, and secondary material on the following issues: ˆorigins, persistence, and revision of socially and religiously constructed gender identities; ˆtypologies of autonomy vs. dependence, security vs. risk, oppression vs. liberation; ˆmedieval and modern women as political actors and exemplars; ˆfemale infanticide, self-immolation of widows, and bride-burning; ˆeducation, health and workplace; ˆ Western and Asian feminisms; and ˆwomen power brokers in what is now India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.  No previous acquaintance with South Asia, or with history, is assumed. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


HIUS 3150 - Salem Witch Trials (Adjunct)

Benjamin Ray

The seminar will explore the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692. How and why did the accusations begin? How and why did they stop? Serious theories and wild speculations abound both in 1692 and now. Who were the female and male heroes, victims, and villains in this tragic episode? The most gripping personal stories are to be found in the primary sources and in literary portrayals by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Arthur Miller. Explore the impact of this small-scale, 300 year-old event upon America’s cultural heritage -- how and why did "Salem witchcraft" become part of the American cultural imagination? The course will draw upon the following recent historical works:  Salem Possessed by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum, Entertaining Satan by John Demos, Salem Story by Bernard Rosenthal, In the Devil’s Snare by Mary Beth Norton, and Judge Sewall’s Apology by Richard Francis in addition to selected journal articles, as well as Arthur Miller's classic play The Crucible. The seminar will include short presentations of reading materials and culminates in two short essays to be written on important figures and/or topics related to the witch trials, based entirely on the primary sources. The best of these essays will become part of the “Notable People & Topics” section of online "Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive" . The class will make extensive use of the online Salem Archive which contains all the original court documents and contemporary accounts.


HIUS 3612 – Women in America, 1865-Present (Primary)

Cori Field

This course will explore the significance of gender in United States from the Civil War to the present. We will ask how people’s ideas about gender structured society and how social relations defined what it meant to be a man or a woman. Readings and discussion will focus on three particular areas of inquiry: the rights and obligations of citizenship; the value and division of labor; and the configuration of emotional life (including familial relationships, erotic desires, and individual aspirations). Resisting any transhistorical definition of womanhood, we will investigate how understandings of gender developed in relation to racial, ethnic, class, and regional differences.

The goal of this course is to become adept at generating your own historical analysis through the study of primary documents. The majority of the readings consist of primary sources—letters, diaries, legal documents, and fiction written by or about women in the past. In addition, you will read a few secondary sources in order to assess how professional historians analyze and employ evidence. Through short weekly writing assignments and class discussion, you will use these readings to develop your own analytical skills. Lectures will introduce topics not covered in the readings. A midterm, a final exam, and a longer (five page) paper will require you to synthesize the readings, lectures, and discussion in order to generate your own arguments about the significance of gender in the American past.

MEDIA STUDIES


MDST 3306 – Gender, Class, Race in Teen Film (Primary)

Andrea Press

Combined with WGS 3306 and SOC 3306.

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?


MDST 3559 – Gender/Sexuality – Fashion /Film (Primary)

D. Verena Kollig

Combined with WGS 3559-6 and GETR 3500

This course considers the relationship between fashion, media and gender and sexuality. It pays particular attention to the relationship between how gender and identity are represented (and challenged) in fashion and film. 


MDST 4200 - Sex and Gender Go To The Movies (Primary)

Andrea Press

Over the past several generations, the mass media have become central to our understanding of the meaning of the categories of “woman” and “man” in American life.  In fact, many argue that the mass media have become central to the reproduction of the “sex-gender system” within which we all live, and under whose influence we form our identities as men and women in this culture.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which popular Hollywood film helps to define cultural ideas about gender differences both in the U.S. and globally.  We will also look at the ways in which feminists have responded to these definitions, by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own.

The course will begin by examining the notion that film might influence our development as gendered individuals, looking at those who have argued both for and against this notion.  We will then consider briefly the different forms of feminist theory which exist, and how they have been applied to the study of the mass media.  This introduction will be followed by an examination of the development of images of women and men in film, and an examination of how these images might function for different segments of the female audience.  We will look briefly at the history of popular Hollywood film, the history of its portrayal of women, scholarly criticisms of these portrayals, scholarly discussions of the appeal of specifically “female” genres such as  melodramas or “the woman’s film” to the female audience, and of “masculine” films and feminist attempts to create alternatives to mainstream images in various media.  Throughout the course we will consider the issue of the representation of minorities in the dominant media, and examine some newly created alternative representations.

MIDDLE EASTERN AND SOUTH ASIAN

LANGUAGES & CULTURES
MESA 2350 – Women and Media in the Middle East and South Asia (Primary)

Lisa Goff

Combined with ENSP 2559

Women in the Middle East have figured prominently in media accounts of the Arab Spring, and have proved themselves particularly adept at using social media outlets such as Twitter, Facebook, and blogs to promote their dual message of political reform and women's rights. Similarly, women in South Asia have embraced social media as a tool for expressing their identities and promoting causes important to women in the region. This course will examine media depictions of women during and after revolutions and uprisings in five selected countries (Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan), and explore how women in those countries have used social media to embrace, rebut, or amplify those depictions. It will pay special attention to the ways in which social media facilitate, or possibly limit, women’s roles as producers and creators of culture. A wave of post-Arab Spring literature, films, etc. from across the region has just started to break. The readings in this course will reflect this flood of new material, but will also look back to earlier revolutions and uprisings, including those that overthrew colonial rulers, in order to compare pre- and post-revolutionary depictions of women in media. One aim of the class will be to examine the ways that politicians and religious leaders have historically used women’s bodies to define pro- and anti-revolutionary forces, as well as nationhood. How are women now, with the tools of social media at their command, (re)defining themselves? The course will address themes of mobility and public space, and will examine the multiple ways in which women in the region have both fueled revolutions and been affected by them. Finally, the course will address the current backlash against women in these regions, and the ways in which women remain divided on issues of how best to achieve, and even to define, their own empowerment. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


PETR 3320/5320 – Life Narratives and Iranian Women Writers (Primary)

Farzaneh Milani

In the unprecedented flourishing of writings about Iran in the U.S. in recent years, one category of books has been the most popular, attracting the attention of politicians, publishers, the media and the reading public alike. While women’s autobiography has attracted growing scholarly attention as an evolving literary form that can offer important insights into changing notions of identity, social and political discourses, and the construction of categories such as race and nation, sustained scholarly study of the genre has largely focused on women’s autobiography in Europe and North America, with only a small group of isolated scholars addressing women’s autobiography in Islamic societies in general and Iran in particular.  This course studies the genealogy and evolution of the genre. No knowledge of the Persian language or literature is necessary. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


SATR 3000 – Women Writing in India & Pakistan (Primary)

Mehr Farooqi

Womanhood may be perceived as a kinship and understood through shared experience. However, women’s identities and subjectivities are shaped within the socio-cultural constraints of their own society. One of our chief concerns in understanding women in the non-Western world is the handicap of our own perspective, that is, the western feminist perspective. Our claims of kinship with non-Western women are often tenuous. For us in this course, it is important to ask how women’s experiences have touched upon women’s writing on the whole. Does this writing address itself to certain questions? How do the women themselves see such writing? Was it/is it marginal or central to their lives? Can we detect any regionality in them? Is there any relationship between women writing and women’s movements, and/or other political activism?

The diversity and pluralism of the Indian subcontinent provides an excellent ground for contextualizing the discourse between literature and gender. We will read and critique the fiction and poetry of culturally specific regions while reflecting on the assumption that experiences and identities are fundamentally gendered. We will explore issues associated with women writing in regional languages to writing in mainstream languages like Hindi, Urdu and English. We will also examine how the publication and dissemination of women’s texts are related to the women movements in India and Pakistan and to South Asian literature as a whole. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.

POLITICS
PLAP 4140 – Gender and American Political Behavior (Primary)



Nicholas Winter

Gender is a social system that defines relevant categories of people, prescribes appropriate attributes and behaviors to those categories, and regularizes power relations among individuals and between society and individuals. Children are socialized very early to recognize, understand, and enact gender, and adults understand and enact it as well.


Yet an amazing proportion of the work on gender and mass political behavior has focused on the gender gap—the average difference between women and men in political attitudes, voting, and other political action. These differences are important, both theoretically and politically, but the gender gap only scratches the surface of the ways that gender can matter for mass politics. This course, therefore, explores the ways gender structures the political system and our understanding of it, and therefore affects political behavior in ways that go well beyond the gender gap.

We will consider the theoretical place of gender in American politics. Has politics been constructed as a symbolically masculine realm? What effects does that have on citizens' attitudes and behavior? Is that changing? In exploring these themes, we will take up a number of topics, including the unavoidable gender gap, the role of masculinity and femininity in conditioning our perceptions of issues and political candidates, and the ways race and gender (and class) interacts in conditioning political behavior.


Prerequisite: Students must have taken at least one class on gender or one class on public opinion or political behavior. Priority will be given to politics majors and to fourth year students.
PLCP 4840 – Gender Politics in Africa (Primary)

Denise Walsh

Comprehensive introduction to gender politics in Africa, including gender transformations under imperial rule, gender and national struggles, gender and culture claims, women’s movements and the gendering of the post-colonial state.

Prerequisite: Some background in comparative politics or at least one social science course in SWAG/WGS. Including: gender and the state; feminist perspectives on war and peace, security, international political economy and the politics of development; and women and human rights. No prior knowledge of feminist theory or international relations is assumed or required. Second Writing Requirement. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 4603 – Sexual Orientation and Human Development (Primary)

Charlotte Patterson

This course is intended as an overview of issues related to sexual orientation across the

life course from the standpoint of the social sciences. The first part of the course is designed to

highlight recent and historical dimensions of controversies about approaches to conceptualization

of sexual identity, origins and development of sexual orientation, and issues related to identity

formation and disclosure in adolescence and early adulthood. The course then moves on to

consider concerns related to sexual orientation during adulthood, such as relationships within

couples, employment and careers, lesbian and gay parenthood, and gay/lesbian aging.

Requirements include two exams, oral participation in one structured in-class debate, a short

paper summarizing an in-class debate, and active participation in class discussion. The course is

intended for advanced undergraduate students in the social sciences; others may enroll with

permission of the instructor.


PSYC 5410 – Juvenile Justice and Violence (Adjunct)

N. Dick Reppucci

RELIGIOUS STUDIES


RELA 3000 – Women and Religion in Africa (Primary)

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

Combined with AAS 3000

This seminar examines women’s religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts.  Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa.  Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women’s agency in indigenous religious movements, Muslim communities and Christian congregations in Africa. Meets the WGS global perspectives requirement.


RELB 3150 – Buddhism and Gender (Primary)

Karen Lang

This seminar takes as its point of departure Carolyn Bynum’s statements: “No scholar studying religion, no participant in ritual, is ever neuter. Religious experience is the experience of men and women, and in no known society is this experience the same.” The unifying theme is gender and Buddhism, exploring historical, textual and social questions relevant to the status of women and men in the Buddhist world from its origins to the present day.


RELC 3150 – Salem Witch Trials (Adjunct)

Benjamin Ray

The seminar will explore the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692. How and why did the accusations begin? How and why did they stop? Serious theories and wild speculations abound both in 1692 and now. Who were the female and male heroes, victims, and villains in this tragic episode? The most gripping personal stories are to be found in the primary sources and in literary portrayals by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Arthur Miller. Explore the impact of this small-scale, 300 year-old event upon America’s cultural heritage – how and why did “Salem witchcraft” become part of the American cultural imagination? The course will draw upon the following recent historical works:  Salem Possessed by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum, Entertaining Satan by John Demos, Salem Story by Bernard Rosenthal, In the Devil’s Snare by Mary Beth Norton, and Judge Sewall’s Apology by Richard Francis in addition to selected journal articles, as well as Arthur Miller’s classic play The Crucible. The seminar will include short presentations of reading materials and culminates in two short essays to be written on important figures and/or topics related to the witch trials, based entirely on the primary sources. The best of these essays will become part of the “Notable People & Topics” section of online “Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive” . The class will make extensive use of the online Salem  Archive which contains all the original court documents and contemporary accounts.


RELC 4610 – Sex and Morality (Primary)

John Portmann

Scholarly analysis of women’s sexual experience in the United States, with a focus on family planning, abortion, marital rape, prostitution, sexual consent, sexual equality, and gay marriage.  Particular attention to the role of Judaism and Christianity in shaping sexual attitudes and norms.


RELI 2559 – Women, Gender and Islam

Staff

SLAVIC STUDIES


SLFK 2120 – Ritual and Family Life (Adjunct)

Anne Ingram

Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the rituals of birth, marriage, and death as practiced in 19th-century peasant Russia and in Russia today and the oral literature associated with these rituals. Topics include family patterns, child socialization and child rearing practices, gender issues, and problems of the elderly in their 19th century and current manifestations.

SOCIOLOGY
SOC 2052 – Sociology of Families (Primary)

Allison Pugh

Families are under siege, although not all of them for the same reasons.  The fragile bonds that hold families together are buffeted by time demands at the workplace, the struggle to make it in the market economy, even the challenge of trust when forging relationships in a divorce culture.  In this class, we’ll consider competing explanations for what makes families spin apart, and our study of these will form the first two-thirds of the course.  The latter third of the course will look at different ways people are trying to remake families, fighting back against the fragmenting forces with alternative ways of caring and providing for each other.  At the end of this class, you should be able to think critically about where families have been and where they are going.


SOC 3306 – Gender, Class, Race in Teen Film (Primary)

Andrea Press

Combined with WGS 3306 and MDST 3306.

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

SPANISH
SPAN 4310 – Latin American Women Writers from 1900 to the Present (Primary)

Omar Velazquez Mendoza

Study of major Latin American women writers from 1900 to the present—poets, essayists, playwrights, and fiction writers. We will read works by authors of various generations and countries as well as essays on gender theory. Discussion will focus on the literary representation of issues related to gender and culture, with emphasis on how women from various backgrounds have articulated their female experience in societies that establish strong differences between the roles of men and women. Films and other audiovisual materials will be used to illustrate the social and cultural context. Class participation, oral presentation, two exams, several short essays, one research paper. Prerequisite: SPAN 330; SPAN 343 highly recommended.


SPAN 4620 – Hispanic Women Writers (Primary)

Alison Weber

This course will explore texts written by women in Spanish from the late Middle Ages to 1800. The unifying theme will be the creation of feminist consciousness. Among the issues we will consider are how women claimed the authority to write or teach during periods when these activities were discouraged; female monasticism and mysticism and their relationship to self-actualization; the means by which women writers emulated, rejected or appropriated male-authored literary models; the development of a separate feminine literary tradition; Enlightenment feminism; and women’s awareness of gender roles as historically constructed. Pre-requisites: Spanish 3300 (or equivalent experience); highly recommended: at least one other literature or culture courses in Spanish at 3000 or 4000 level. The course will be conducted in Spanish.




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