Winter 2012 Instructor: Dickman envs 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr)



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Environmental Studies Program

Course Descriptions

2011-2012

WINTER 2012

Instructor: Dickman

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr)

This is an introductory course in environmental natural sciences. It is part of the core sequence in Environmental Studies and is required for the Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. It is an introductory course, designed for freshmen and sophomores, and satisfies University general education breadth requirements for natural sciences. The only prerequisite is Math 95 or equivalent. Course goals include to promote understanding of the value and limitations of science in understanding environmental issues; to increase familiarity with scientific concepts underlying selected environmental issues and quantitative techniques that scientists use to evaluate them; to promote an understanding of how science is used to manage natural resources to promote a sustainable economy; to enhance ability to think creatively, analytically, and without bias (i.e. to think critically); and to understand how environmental science issues pervade our lives and gain confidence to understand these issues and make decisions based on your understanding and values. Four environmental issues are examined in some depth: human population growth, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and energy use. (Winter)



ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr) TBA

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (Winter)



Instructor: Cameron

ENVS 335 Allocation of Scarce Environmental Resources (4 cr)

Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society’s preferences and the cost of environmental protection and resources conservations. (Winter)


Instructor: Bothum

ENVS 350 Energy Footprint (4 cr)

Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation, including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources. (Winter)


Instructor: Toth/Roddy

ENVS 411 Topic: Communicating Environmental Issues with Theatre (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Winter)


Instructor: Barger

ENVS 411 Topic: The Federal Conservation System (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Winter)


Instructor: Lynch

ENVS 425/525 Environmental Education: Theory & Practice (4 cr)

In-depth examination of environmental education in theory and practice. Topics include learning theories, environmental literacy, and how to successfully plan, implement and evaluate educational programs. We will also examine how EE is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. A major focus is the group project, in which you will work in collaboration with a community partner to help develop EE materials. (Winter)


Instructor: Boulay

ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (4 cr)

An introduction to the theory, techniques, and practice of environmental and ecological monitoring designed to ground students in the data collection, analysis, and presentation methods; local case studies. Lectures, laboratories, field trips. Calculus of statistics recommended. (Winter)


Instructor: Norgaard

ENVS 435/535 Environmental Justice (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Winter)


Instructor: Bridgham

ENVS 465/565 Wetland Ecology and Management (4 cr)

Examines management, law, and policies related to wetlands in an ecological framework; includes wetland type definitions, classification, distribution, formation and development, and restoration. (Winter)


Instructor: Walker

ENVS 607 Seminar: Political Ecology (4 cr)

Political ecology examines the politics (in the broadest sense of the word) of the environment. Whereas environmental politics courses often focus on the role of government and interest groups in shaping specific environmental policies, political ecology expands our understanding of ‘politics’ to examine the roles of: 1) environmental rhetoric (‘discourse’), ideology, and knowledge; 2) politics and environmental change; 3) economic systems (including ‘globalization’); 4) gender-based dimensions of resource ownership and use; 5) and everyday struggles within communities and households (including ‘community’-based resource management) as they shape human relationships with nature. Although much of the political ecology literature comes from studies of the less-developed ‘third world,’ this course also examines the political ecology of the ‘first world.’ (Winter)



Instructor: TBA

ENVS 610 PhD Seminar

Pending course description (Winter)


Instructor: Bridgham

ENVS 632 Environmental Studies Research Methodology (2 cr)

Identifying a clear and concise research problem, developing methodology to address that problem, and engaging the process of developing a thorough knowledge of relevant literature. (Winter)


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SPRING 2012

Instructor: TBA

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr)

This course introduces some of the major contributions of the social sciences to understanding how and why environmental problems happen—the social ‘root causes’ of these problems. Environmentally harmful human behavior is not simply a fact of life: it is a product of specific social conditions, which can be studied, understood, and changed. This course also examines social approaches to resolving environmental problems, including ideas such as ‘sustainability’, ‘market-based’ environmental policies, reforms of property systems, and social movements that promote concepts such as environmental justice, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. In this course, students practice applying these conceptual approaches by using them to analyze the root causes, consequences, and possible solutions to specific environmental topics. In previous years, the course has focused on topics such as global warming, energy, and the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis. (Spring)



Instructor: Toadvine

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr)

This course is a survey of the contribution of humanities disciplines (e.g., literature, intellectual history, religious studies, and philosophy) to understanding the relationship between human beings and the natural environment. Theoretical perspectives covered in the course include the intellectual history of Western cultural attitudes and perceptions of nature, the role of religion in shaping environmental values, Native American perspectives on the environment, and the suggestions of contemporary radical ecology movements – deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism – for revitalizing human relationships with the environment. The last segment of the course examines humanities perspectives on several current environmental issues: wilderness preservation, the Pacific Northwest salmon crisis, population and resource use, and global climate collapse. The course emphasizes the skills of textual and cultural interpretation, value reasoning, and critical inquiry as these are demonstrated in the engagement of the humanities with environmental concerns. This course fulfills the Arts and Letters Group Requirement and is a core course requirement for Environmental Studies and Environmental Science majors. (Spring)



Instructor: Bothun

ENVS 355 Environmental Data Analysis and Modeling (4 cr)

Statistical methods of data modeling and analysis with specific application to environmental data sets. (Spring)



Instructor: Dennis, Roering, Roy

ENVS 399 Seminar: Natural and Cultural History (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Spring)



Instructor: Knapp

ENVS 411 Topic: Envir. Conservation and Restoration in the Pacific Northwest (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Spring)


Instructor: Lynch/Boulay

ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: (Project) (1-4 cr)

This class is the first quarter of the Environmental Leadership Program’s two-quarter Environmental Education Initiative. During this winter we will explore various progressive educational theories and see how environmental education is practiced in Oregon, nationally and around the globe. You will work in teams to apply your skills, strengths and creativity towards developing educational materials that will make a difference in our community and wider world. (Spring)


This year the teams and community partners are:

Canopy Connection (Lynch)

People and Plants I (Lynch)

People and Plants II (Lynch)

Conservation Research (Boulay)

Prairie Restoration (Boulay)

Stream Stewardship (Boulay)
Instructor: Martin

ENVS 411/511 Topic: Sustainable Agriculture (4 cr)

Examines traditional non-industrialized, modern industrialized, modern organic, and genetically modified crop-based systems through the lens of sustainability. (Spring)


Instructor: Westling

ENVS 633 Thesis Development (3 cr)

Interdisciplinary readings in environmental studies focused on student thesis topics.  Preparation for presentations at the Joint Environmental Conference and preparation to complete the MA/MS thesis/terminal project proposals. (Spring)



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SUMMER 2012
Instructor: TBA

ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences (4 cr) TBA

Contributions of social sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include human population; relations between social institutions and environmental problems; and associated historical, political, legal, policy and economic processes. (Summer)


Instructor: TBA

ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences (4 cr)

Online course. Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery. (Summer)


Instructor: TBA

ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities (4 cr)

Contributions of the humanities and arts to understandings of the environment. Emphasis on diverse ways of thinking, writing, creating, and engaging in environmental discourse. (Summer)


Instructor: TBA

ENVS 411/511 Topic: (4 cr)

(Pending course description) (Summer)


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