Week 1 t 1/7 Introduction to Course Class Introductions, "Getting to Know You" Activity Student Objectives



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American Journalism History (JOU 4004)

Spring 2014 Course Timeline

WEEK 1

T 1/7 -- Introduction to Course

Class Introductions, "Getting to Know You" Activity
Student Objectives: List reasons why journalism history and the development of Watchdog Journalism is applicable to student career goals; Recall behaviors and activities required to excel in this course; Recognize where to locate important information in the syllabus; Identify fellow classmates in order to perform various activities within the classroom and build rapport

Activities: Begin class with PollEverywhere.com activity to poll students over want they want to do in their careers (using various media-based careers, plus “other”); Go over course information, syllabus; Students break into pairs for 3 minutes then introduce each other in 60 seconds or less; Homework: read introductory chapter in textbook or find the chapter in the Sakai resources

Audio/Visual: Brief PPT with course name, YouTube clip from “All the President’s Men,” learning objectives, instructor bio, highlights from syllabus; Internet walk-through for where to locate course materials uploaded to Sakai

Homework: Read Introduction chapter from book or via .pdf on Sakai, read syllabus

R 1/9 -- Historical background that led to the idea of a Free Press

American Media History, Introduction: Before the American Experience
Student Objectives: Recognize how unique and relatively new Freedom of the Press is to western society; Describe how information was communicated prior to the printing press and how that created an environment subject to misinformation; Identify why knowledge and written communication was limited to the upper classes of society; Recognize how the printing press not only changed the business of reproducing books and documents, but introduced significant social and societal changes; Explain why those in power were threatened by the printing press and what actions they took to curb the influence of the written word; Outline the significant contributions of Milton, Hobbes, Locke, and Cato's Letters in terms of laying the groundwork for the American Revolution, the ideal of Freedom of the Press, and the First Amendment

Activities: Brief introductions for any “add” students; Lecture with points of discussion; Divide class into pairs, choose 5 out of 7 points brought out in the lesson, write brief answers describing those points for a quiz grade

Audio/Visual: PPT on how information was relayed in ancient Rome up until the rule of King Charles I of England and Colonial philosophers

Homework: Read chapter one from book or via .pdf on Sakai, review syllabus

WEEK 2

T 1/14 – Review of prior lesson (to accommodate drop/add)

The press in Colonial America

American Media History, Chapter One: The Colonial Years
Student Objectives: Recall the political and social background that led to the idea of press freedom; Describe how the press played a role in unifying and solidifying ideas among Colonial leaders; Reinforce the behaviors and activities required to excel in this course; Recognize where to find specific information in the course syllabus

Activities: Review prior lesson to accommodate new students and reinforce the SLOs from the prior class; Return graded lecture quiz from prior class; Lecture with points of class discussion; Administer syllabus quiz

Audio/Visual: PPT of Intro lesson with students describing the slides (instructor calls on students) allowing students to review along with their graded lecture quiz; Begin new PPT on Press in Colonial America (will not get through entire chapter)

Homework: Review chapter one in textbook or via .pdf on Sakai; Read chapter two in textbook or via .pdf in Sakai

R 1/16 -- Continue American Media History, Chapter One: The Colonial Years

American Media History, Chapter Two: The Press & The Revolution

Alert class to upcoming group presentations and divide class into assigned groups
Student Objectives: Describe how the press energized and contributed to the American Revolution; Name the individuals who pushed for press freedom; Distinguish how the crown restrictions encouraged rebellion rather than discouraged it; Recognize individual contributions to press freedom and locate one individual who might be worthy of a group project

Activities: Review prior lesson and continue to finish information from Colonial Years chapter; break up class with group activity/quiz grade on which phrases would be permissible under the laws of the crown; segue into the Press & the Revolution lecture; brief discussion of upcoming group projects to recommend preliminary research on possible choice of person

Audio/Visual: PPT reviewing information from prior class with students describing the slides (instructor calls on students) continue and finish Chapter One information; Clip from “John Adams” illustrating frustration with the crown rule and press restrictions to segue into group activity; PPT for Chapter Two discussion on Press & Revolution

Homework: Make certain to have copy of textbook or work out an agreement with a fellow student; Generate preferences for possible group project topic with some preliminary research

WEEK 3

T 1/21 -- Explain group presentation assignment, handout examples, take questions

Groups meet to discuss preferred choice of topics

Groups submit top choices; topics are decided first come first served through classroom

contest

Groups use remainder of class to discuss presentation and divide individual

responsibilities with input from the Instructor
Student Objectives: Distinguish an individual from the textbook worthy of further study and class instruction; Discuss selections with group members in such a way that the group collectively agrees on a single individual to highlight; Outline how to proceed with the group assignment; Identify how to divide up work among individuals in such a way as to encourage productivity and fairness; Recognize the importance of keeping up with current news events

Activities: Instructor passes out paper handouts describing presentation assignment with examples; Instructor divides up class into predetermined groups of 4-to-5 people; Groups meet to determine their first selections and two backups (with instructor guidance and input); Quick current event contest in class (Jeopardy style) to determine selection order; Remainder of class given to groups to divide up work individually

Audio/Visual: Jeopardy-style contest on current events to determine the order that groups get to select their individual (from high score to low)

Homework: Research and activity to support group project; Read chapter three in textbook

R 1/23 -- American Media History, Chapter Three: The Press & the Founding of a Nation

Limited group work on presentations; Instructor receives updates, groups assigned

presentation dates
Student Objectives: Recognize the struggles of the early nation with regards to the role of the press; describe how Forefathers addressed and debated what the role of the press ought to be; Discuss completed work for group project; Identify what work needs to come next; Recall group progress and explain that to the instructor

Activities: Lecture/discussion of information in Chapter Three; Pair up students to complete quiz activity; Review information from Chapters 1-to-3 ahead of exam with students describing the slides (instructor calls on students); Groups meet in last 20 minutes of class to discuss progress and relay information to the instructor for review and guidance; In last 5 minutes of class, instructor announces which days which groups will present

Audio/Visual: PPT for Chapter Three discussion, PPTs from Chapters 1 & 2 for review purposes

Homework: Continue work on group projects; review/study all material covered so far for upcoming exam

WEEK 4

T 1/28 -- Exam (Chapters 1-3)
Student Objectives: Recall important details regarding the development of the printed word, how it impacted western society and knowledge, and why it was so important to the U.S. Founding Fathers.

Activities: 50 question exam using Scantron multiple choice questions along with a section of fill-in-the-blank questions

Homework: Continue work on group projects; read/study chapter four in the textbook

R 1/30 -- American Media History, Chapter Four: A Press for the Masses

Review Exam results, grades returned
Student Objectives: Identify what areas of course knowledge need more study attention; Infer individual grade standing; Appreciate how the role of the press influenced early American thought and literacy; Recognize how many newspapers began and how important those early papers were for community building; Discuss how different newspapers looked before and after the advertising business model was established; Identify how the advertising business model made newspapers much more affordable for the general public and helped to make the population more literate

Activities: Review exam results and discuss the top 10 most missed questions plus any other specific questions requested by students; Lecture & discussion over chapter four material; reinforce group presentations coming up and open the floor to questions about the project

Audio/Visual: PPT for Chapter Four discussion

Homework: Continue work on group projects

WEEK 5

T 2/4 -- Groups meet in and around classroom to finalize presentations; Instructor meets with

each group to provide immediate feedback and evaluate progress
Student Objectives: Practice group-building productivity; identify the strengths and weaknesses of the collective group work ethic; modify the group work flow as needed in order to complete the project; explain the contributions of the individual featured in the project; outline the delivery method and individual responsibilities

Activities: Groups meet in and around the classroom with the instructor checking progress, identifying weaknesses, and suggesting modifications

Audio/Visual: None

Homework: Completion of group work; read chapter five

R 2/6 -- Groups 1-4 Presentations on Colonial & Revolutionary Journalists

American Media History, Chapter Five: A Divided Nation, A Divided Media
Student Objectives: Demonstrate to the class the importance and significance of a colonial-era journalist while non-presenting classmates recognize the effort and contribution; Discuss the significance of journalism during the Civil War era and the extreme limitations brought on by a lack of reliable transportation or communication arteries

Activities: First groups present for first 40-45 minutes of class; remainder of of class is Lecture/Discussion;

Audio/Visual: Handout of actual Civil War era article; PPT supporting chapter five material

Homework: Read Civil War article and prepare to discuss its more noteworthy characteristics; review chapter five; Groups who did not yet present finish preparations for presentation

WEEK 6

T 2/11 -- Groups 5-7 Presentations on Colonial & Revolutionary Journalists

Continue American Media History, Chapter Five: A Divided Nation, A Divided Media
Student Objectives: Demonstrate to the class the importance and significance of a colonial-era journalist while non-presenting classmates recognize the effort and contribution; Discuss the significance of journalism during the Civil War era and the extreme limitations brought on by a lack of reliable transportation or communication arteries

Activities: Remaining groups present for first 25-30 minutes; finish Chapter Five lecture/Discussion PPT; discussion of Civil War article—how does it differ from the news articles of today?

Audio/Visual: Final pages of Chapter Five PPT

Homework: Supplemental readings uploaded to Sakai—more Civil War articles from various influential journalists of the period

R 2/13 -- Supplemental Readings: Civil War Journalism (See the "Resources" folder in Sakai)
Student Objectives: Define the significant characteristics of journalism during the Civil War era and the extreme limitations brought on by a lack of reliable transportation or communication arteries; Recognize the desperation and urgency of families who had loved ones on the battle field; Discuss how the lack of technological advances and resources contributed to the difficulties of the war and its aftermath

Activities: Read and discuss points from the collection of Civil War articles; incorporate the biographical information and significance of the different journalists of the period

Audio/Visual: Brief PPT of biographical information on the various journalists whose articles were read by the class in advance; Search for civil war documentary excerpt focusing on the struggle of journalists trying to cover the war and the frustration of the Generals trying not to give away too much information

Homework: Read Chapter 6 on the Yellow Press


WEEK 7

T 2/18 -- American Media History, Chapter Six: The Yellow Press & The Times
Student Objectives: Define the characteristics of the Yellow Press and what set it apart from other periods of journalism; Recognize what competition means to publishers and owners of media companies both in this era and in the modern day; Explain why the Times went in a different direction and how that came to help/hurt reputation/circulation

Activities: Begin class with Pop Quiz on the chapter; Lecture & Discussion on a portion of Chapter 6; break students into groups and have them collectively retake the pop quiz

Audio/Visual: PPT on first portion of Chapter 6

Homework: Review chapter six

R 2/20 -- Continue American Media History, Chapter Six: The Yellow Press & The Times

Assign Individual Presentations on Muckrakers

Review material for Midterm Exam
Student Objectives: Define the characteristics of the Yellow Press and what set it apart from other periods of journalism; Recognize what competition means to publishers and owners of media companies both in this era and in the modern day; Explain why the Times went in a different direction and how that came to help/hurt reputation/circulation; Explain the assignment for individual presentations on muckrakers (to be discussed in the next chapter)

Activities: Lecture/discussion over remaining material of chapter six; Handout assignment for upcoming individual presentations on muckrakers and answer any questions; In second hour, quickly review material from prior lessons with students explaining PPT points

Audio/Visual: PPT on remainder of Chapter Six; Replay PPTs from prior lessons

Homework: Study all materials for comprehensive midterm exam

WEEK 8

T 2/25 -- Midterm Exam (comprehensive)

Submit Proposed Topic for Individual Presentations via e-mail by noon on 2/26

Wednesday
Student Objectives: Recall important details from beginning of course; Interpret what material is most important; Demonstrate understanding and comprehension of material and points discussed in class

Activities: 75 question exam using Scantron multiple choice questions along with a section of fill-in-the-blank questions; student selects one of three questions to write a 1 page essay (handwritten on college ruled paper, single spaced)

Homework: Read Chapter 7 in textbook; submit proposed topic for individual presentations by noon 2/26

R 2/27 -- American Media History, Chapter Seven: Magazines, Muckraking, & Public Relations

Review Exam results, grades returned

Feedback on topics for Individual Presentations; presentation day assigned
Student Objectives: Define muckrakers and their significance for readers of the day; Recognize the difference between magazines of this era and the magazines of today and why this is important; Describe what public relations is, how its mission differs from other forms of mass media, and what spurred its development; Identify what areas of course knowledge need more study attention; Infer individual grade standing; Assess knowledge gained so far and its relevance to career choice

Activities: Begin lecture/discussion on Chapter 7; Return exams and topic selection for individual presentations; Announce dates for individual presentations; Allow students to look over materials and ask questions

Audio/Visual: PPT on Chapter 7

Homework: None (but encourage students to review Chapter 7 and begin research for individual presentations if possible over the break, understanding that is unlikely)

SPRING BREAK 3/1-3/8

WEEK 9

T 3/11 -- Review & Continue American Media History, Chapter Seven: Magazines, Muckraking, &

Public Relations

Discussion of research paper assignment and potential topics
Student Objectives: Define muckrakers and their significance for readers of the day; Recognize the difference between magazines of this era and the magazines of today and why this is important; Describe what public relations is, how its mission differs from other forms of mass media, and what spurred its development; Recall an interesting topic in journalism history that may make a good topic for indepth research

Activities: Review material discussed prior to Spring Break; Continue with Lecture/Discussion on Chapter 7 on Magazines, Muckraking and Public Relations; Review upcoming individual presentations and assigned dates

Audio/Visual: PPT on Chapter 7

Homework: Read Chapter 8 in textbook; Find interesting research topic

R 3/13 -- American Media History, Chapter Eight: American Film

Submit Research Paper Topic via e-mail before class time
Student Objectives: Define how the film industry began in America and its early impact on society; Explain why the film industry survived in spite of economic or social downturns; Recognize what early film looked like, why audiences responded as they did, how filmmaking was produced and progressed;

Activities: Begin class with pop quiz on chapter 8 content; lecture on and discuss chapter 8 content incorporating old movie clips to show various historic films; break into groups and retake pop quiz, allowing groups to debate and correct their answers

Audio/Visual: PPT of chapter eight; black and white film clips including the Trip to the Moon and The Great Train Robbery

Homework: Complete individual presentations; students schedule to present for the following class period must submit a bibliography ahead of class time

WEEK 10

T 3/18 -- Group 1/Individual Presentations: Muckrakers & Early Investigative Journalists

Group 1/Bibliography for Presentations due uploaded to Sakai before class time

Feedback on Research Paper Topic
Student Objectives: Define muckrakers and their significance for readers of the day; Identify how journalism inspired changes that benefitted society and individuals; Recognize the power of Watchdog Journalism and its potential benefits; Explain the historical significance of the Muckrakers and why it is relevant today

Activities: Individual presentations; Instructor returns students' research topic proposals with feedback; Any student needing further topic action is scheduled to meet with the instructor outside of class to follow up and submit an approved topic

Audio/Visual: Students' individual PPTs for their presentations

Homework: Complete individual presentations; students schedule to present for the following class period must submit a bibliography ahead of class time; Review chapter eight; Locate ten sources for research paper

R 3/20 -- Group 2/Individual Presentations: Muckrakers & Early Investigative Journalists

Group 2/Bibliography for Presentations due uploaded to Sakai before class time

Continue American Media History, Chapter Eight: American Film
Student Objectives: Define muckrakers and their significance for readers of the day; Identify how journalism inspired changes that benefitted society and individuals; Recognize the power of Watchdog Journalism and its potential benefits; Explain the historical significance of the Muckrakers and why it is relevant today; Define how the film industry began in America and its early impact on society; Explain why the film industry survived in spite of economic or social downturns; Recognize what early film looked like, why audiences responded as they did, how filmmaking was produced and progressed;

Activities: Individual presentations; review chapter eight materials; incorporate clips of historically significant films

Audio/Visual: Students' individual PPTs for their presentations; PPT for chapter eight review and completion; Film clips from Citizen Kane, Gone with the Wind, and North by Northwest

Homework: Complete individual presentations; students schedule to present for the following class period must submit a bibliography ahead of class time; Review chapter eight; Locate ten sources for research paper

WEEK 11

T 3/25 -- Group 3/Individual Presentations: Muckrakers & Early Investigative Journalists

Group 3/Bibliography for Presentations due uploaded to Sakai before class time
Student Objectives: Define muckrakers and their significance for readers of the day; Identify how journalism inspired changes that benefitted society and individuals; Recognize the power of Watchdog Journalism and its potential benefits; Explain the historical significance of the Muckrakers and why it is relevant today

Activities: Individual presentations

Audio/Visual: Students' individual PPTs for their presentations

Homework: Read Chapter nine and supplemental readings on World War II Journalism via Sakai; Finish early draft of bibliography for research paper; begin outline for research paper

R 3/27 -- American Media History, Chapter Nine: Radio & Its Promises

Supplemental Readings: World War II Journalism

Early Draft of Bibliography for Research Paper Due

Review for Exam

Student Objectives: Explain the early development of radio; Define its significance in American homes in terms of news and entertainment; Recognize the significance of FDR's Fireside Chats and Orson Wells' War of the Worlds broadcast; Recall the significance of radio news during World War II

Activities: Lecture and discuss radio history and its early significance; class pairs up to fill out pop quiz on the lecture using discussion and notes; Review material following midterms using PPTs and students explaining the slides

Audio/Visual: PPT with multiple radio clips including War of the Worlds, Little Orphan Annie, FDR, and Edward R. Murrow during the World War II bombing of London; PPTs of prior lessons to review

Homework: Study for exam; continue working on outline for research paper

WEEK 12

T 4/1 -- Exam over all material covered after midterm exam

Bibliography for Research Paper Returned with Feedback
Student Objectives: Recall important details from lessons after midterms; Interpret what material is most important; Demonstrate understanding and comprehension of material and points discussed in class

Activities: 50 question exam using Scantron multiple choice questions along with a section of fill-in-the-blank questions; bibliographies returned with feedback

Homework: Read Chapter Ten from beginning through Quiz Show Scandals section; Complete outline for research paper

R 4/3 -- American Media History, Chapter Ten: Progress & Problems

Topic focus: Early TV Inventors through Quiz Show Scandals

Review Exam results, grades returned

Outline for Research Paper Due e-mailed by class time
Student Objectives: Explain the early development of television; Define its significance in American homes in terms of news and entertainment; Recognize the significance of entertainment television legends Milton Berle, Lucille Ball, Ed Sullivan, and other entertainers; Recall the significance and business model of early television and regulation; Discuss the Quiz Show Scandal and its historical significance

Activities: Begin with a pop quiz over the material; Lecture, discussion, and illustration of the history of television with a focus on the entertainment aspects; students pair up and retake pop quiz at the end of class

Audio/Visual: PPTs with lots of old television clips; longer clip of 21; movie clip from Quiz Show

Homework: Read Chapter ten sections on Edward R. Murrow, Television News, and 60 Minutes

WEEK 13

T 4/8 -- American Media History, Chapter Ten: Progress & Problems

Topic focus: Edward R. Murrow, Television News, & 60 Minutes

Outline for Research Paper Returned with Feedback
Student Objectives: Explain the significance of Edward R. Murrow, the Red Scare, and McCarthyism; Define the development and growth of television news and documentary programs; Recognize what is similar and what is different with television news programs compared to then and now

Activities:

Audio/Visual: PPTs with lots of old television clips including See It Now, old Cold War "duck and cover" films, Senator McCarthy speech, 60 Minutes

Homework: Read chapter ten sections on women in media and the Vietnam war in media

R 4/10 -- American Media History, Chapter Ten: Progress & Problems

Topic focus: Women in Media, The Vietnam War in Media
Student Objectives: Explain the significance of women in the media and their struggle for career advancement; Recall some of the early female role models, especially with regard to broadcast journalism; Define the historical significance of the Vietnam War as it was presented in the media and why the media is blamed for contributing to the social discord associated with the war;

Activities: Lecture and discussion of topics interspersed with television clips; students pair up and take quiz at the end of class

Audio/Visual: PPT with lots of television clips, including early television newscasts with Barbara Walters and disturbing images of the Tet Offensive (with a warning for the class about the images being difficult for some to see and why that was historically significant);

Homework: Complete research paper, read chapter ten section on civil rights and the media

WEEK 14

T 4/15 -- No Class, Completed Research Paper Uploaded to Sakai by 11:59 p.m.


R 4/17 -- American Media History, Chapter Ten: Progress & Problems

Topic focus: Civil Rights and the Media
Student Objectives: Explain the significance of the Civil Rights Movement and in particular how the media contributed to the effort for change; Recall some of the more significant protests including the Freedom Riders, Alabama Governor George Wallace, and the Little Rock Nine and how those stories were covered by the media; Define the significance of the MLK I Have a Dream speech

Activities: Lecture and discussion of topics interspersed with television clips; students pair up and take quiz at the end of class

Audio/Visual: PPT with lots of television clips from the aforementioned events

Homework: Read chapter ten section on JFK

WEEK 15

T 4/22 -- American Media History, Chapter Ten: Progress & Problems

Topic focus: JFK: The First Television President

Final day of class
Student Objectives: Explain why JFK was called The First Television President; Recall some of the more significant events of JFK's presidency and how those events were covered in the media; Describe why there are so many conspiracy theories surrounding the JFK assassination and the enormous amount of books, articles, movies, and programs dedicated to addressing the issue

Activities: Lecture and discussion of topics interspersed with television clips; students pair up and take quiz at the end of class

Audio/Visual: PPT interspersed with clips including the JFK/Nixon debate, JFK's inaugural address "Ask not...", and the Zapruder film

R 4/24 -- Reading Day, No Classes


FINAL EXAM

M 4/28 -- 5:30 p.m., covers all course content


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