Videos on Africa Camosun College Library Video Holdings (Jan 2012)



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Part 4 of a series on how the globalized world economy affects ordinary people. A group of health professionals spends nine months each year touring the poorest and most remote areas of South Africa. With a full contingent of volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists and health educators on board, the "good clean health train" delivers quality health care to deprived rural communities.

2000

South Africa

The Third sex

This program examines intersexuality through four case studies: ambiguous genitalia deriving from a missing sex chromosome, Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome, 5-Alpha-Reductase Deficiency in an insular Caribbean community and hermaphroditism in South Africa. The issue of societal acceptance is addressed as well, along with the vital importance of emotional support and counseling. Contains nudity.

1997

South Africa

You can't beat a woman

This documentary explores the problem of violence against women on a global level. The abuse of women is followed through Canada, Russia, South Africa, Israel, Japan and Chile.

1997

South Africa

The human race

A four-part documentary series in which historian and journalist Gwynne Dyer weighs the implications of the way we live together, the way we organize societies, and our complex relationship with the environment. Part 1: Examines the implications of large developing countries like India adopting full-scale consumer economies. Part 2: Documents the experience of a remarkable group of South Africans engaged in moving their society beyond racial and tribal compartments built by apartheid. Part 3: Visits the Nile Valley to chart the emergence of patriarchy in ancient history, and to counter the notion that male domination somehow represents a natural an inevitable order. Part 4: Examines the effects of industrialization on Mexico, and the impact of its development on the rest of the world

1994

South Africa

Political organization

Examines major types of political organization as categorized by anthropology, illustrating each with footage from a representative culture. Topics include: bands (Kung of South Africa), tribes (Mendi of New Guinea), chiefdoms (Kpelle of Liberia), theocracy (Tibet), sovereign states; role of kinship and religion; recent trends toward decentralization (Soviet Union, Africa).

1994

South Africa

Economic anthropology

Examines economic behaviour in a variety of cultures, focussing largely on methods for the distribution of goods and trading patterns. Topics include: generalized reciprocity (Kung of South Africa), balanced reciprocity (Yanomamo of Venuzuela & Trobriand Islanders), central redistribution (Mendi of New Guinea), marketplace (Asante of Ghana), mixed local/world market (carpet makers of Afghanistan), cash economy (United States).

1994

South Africa

Family and household

Examines concepts of family as a social unit and household as an economic unit in a variety of cultures. Topics include: naming customs, socialization of children (Mbuti pygmies of Zaire, North American nuclear family), family violence, extended family (India), matrilineal/patrilocal households (Asante of Ghana), single mothers (United States), effects of social change e.g. settlement on traditional family structures (Yanomamo of South America, Kung of South Africa).

1994

South Africa

Culture change

Discusses factors that precipitate social change (innovation, invention, diffusion) and documents their impact on a number of cultures. Topics include: modern agriculture vs. traditional rice farming (Bali), colonialism and land tenure (Kung of South Africa), resource development (mining) and environmental destruction (Yanonamo of Venezuela, Brazil), technology - roads, electricity, etc. (Maya of Mexico).

1994

South Africa

Age, common interest and stratification

Examines social groupings based on age, common interest or class, detailing their role in a variety of cultures. Topics include: recreational associations, Black railway porters, street gangs, upper class society (United States); Masai male age sets (East Africa), Blacks (South Africa), caste system (India).

1994

South Africa

Gender matters

Despite making a substantial contribution to Third World economy, gender differences in India, Africa and South America result in women having no control of their lives or the resources they produce. Examines the different forms of gender subordination and their historical roots and how women need a public voice to influence levels of government and development planners.

1994

South Africa

The Muvver tongue

During the 19th century, the English language spread throughout the British Empire to New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia, India, Singapore, Hong Kong and the Falkland Islands. This program gives an overview of the spread and influence of English through British colonialism.

1986

Sudan

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24 days in Brooks

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In a decade, tiny Brooks, Alberta has been transformed from a socially conservative, primarily Caucasian town to one of the most diverse places in Canada. Hijabs have become commonplace, downtown bars feature calypso and residents speak 90 different languages. Immigrants and refugees have flocked here to work at Lakeside Packers - one of the world's largest slaughterhouses. Centring on the 24 days of the first-ever strike at Lakeside, this film is a nuanced portrait of people working together and adapting to change. They are people like Peter Jany Khwai, who escaped war in Sudan, wears an African shirt and a cowboy hat, and affirms his Canadian identity as well as his determination to fight for his rights. Or Edil Hassan, a devout Muslim born in Somalia, who counts her hours of organizing and picketing among her proudest moments. As 24 Days in Brooks shows, people from widely different backgrounds can work together for respect, dignity, and change - even though getting there is not easy.

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2007

Sudan

The new killing fields

Travels behind the rebel lines in Darfur, Sudan, uncovering evidence of systematic killings on a horrific scale, possibly the first genocide of the twenty-first century. Attempts to find out more about the Janjaweed and their leaders

2004

Sudan

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Patterns of subsistence. Food foragers and pastoralists

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Examines food supply techniques of hunter-gatherers and pastoral (herder, nomad) societies, and discusses ensuing cultural characteristics. Includes segments on: the Kung people of the Kalahari Desert, Mbuti pygmies of Zaire, Netsilik Inuit, Nuer of Sudan, Sherpas of Nepal, Baseri of Iran, and Kwakiutl Indians.

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1994

Sudan

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Language and communication

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Examines the relationship between language and culture. Topics include: language structure and acquisition, non-verbal communication, social/historical factors in dialect development (Black English); role in cultural renaissance (Kwakiutl Indians), as a shaper of worldview (Hopi Indians), and reflector of socio-economic conditions (Nuer people of Sudan).

1994

Tanzania

Darwin's nightmare

Darwin's nightmare is an essential documentary on the perverse aspects of globalization. A documentary film that exposes the poverty and misery of the people living on the shores on Lake Victoria in Tanzania who are dependent upon fishing the Nile perch from the lake for their meager earnings. The fish are exported by air to Europe to be sold cheaply and the planes that arrive to transport the fish at first seem to arrive empty, but turn out to carry weapons to Africa and fish away. Enter the Nile perch, a voracious predator implanted into Lake Victoria in Africa in the '60's which extinguished native fish species and multiplied so fast that its fillets are today exported worldwide - predominantly in exchange for the countless weapons used to wage war in the dark centre of the continent.

2005

Tanzania

Africa, who is to blame?

Civil wars rage in at least 16 African countries and, despite an abundance of natural resources, millions of Africans live in abject poverty. But who's responsible? And, more importantly, what can be done to promote peace and prosperity? Tony Blair has described the plight of Africa as 'a scar on the conscience of the world'. And for older Africans, Africa's woes are due to factors beyond the continent's control: colonialism, the slave trade, racist plots, greedy multinationals and deteriorating terms of trade. But for a new generation, personified by June Arunga 'widely touted as a future leader of Kenya' this picture of Africa as global victim doesn't wash. The history and present day situations in Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, and Rwanda are explored. In this program ex-president of Ghana, JJ Rawlings, together with Arunga, talk to Africa's political and economic elites, and meet ordinary Africans. They set out to uncover the root causes of Africa's misery.

2005

Tunisia

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The silver age

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Part 13 of a series on how the globalized world economy affects ordinary people. Advances in healthcare mean that more people are living longer with over 560 million age 60 and over in the world today. In parts of Europe, North America, and Japan, the proportion of older people is rising faster than any other group. The result, often, is a growing population of old people with too few young people to take care of them. This program explores the implications in three different countries: India, Japan and Tunisia.



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2003

Uganda

Educating Lucia

Part 25 of a series on how the globalized world economy affects ordinary people. Focuses on the story of three African sisters who want to graduate to secondary school but are more likely to receive no formal education, working as seasonal laborers on one of Zimbabwe's large tobacco farms. They're being raised by their grandmother who can only afford school fees for one girl. In African countries such as Zimbabwe, Uganda and Benin the odds are dramatically against girls getting an education.

2005

Uganda

The dollar a day dress

Steve Bradshaw travels to Mali, Uganda, Peru and Cambodia. In each country he tries to collect locally-produced fabric for London College of Fashion students to make into a symbolic dress. This dress represents the plight of the more than one billion people who live on a dollar a day or less because of the world's trade system, specifically subsidies to farmers in Europe and the U.S. of almost $300 billion a year, six times the amount the West gives in aid, which makes it extremely difficult for poor countries to exploit their trade advantage.

2003

Uganda

Speaking out : women of Uganda

Until recently, Uganda garnered attention for its policy of placing women in decision-making roles. For over 10 years, the country not only had women in the roles of Vice President, Minister of Ethics and Integrity and frequently members of parliament, they also focused substantial dollars on education and community development for girls and women. Speaking Out: Women of Uganda introduces not only these high-level politicians, but also a diverse array of women empowering themselves and their communities. From the child-led Girls Education Movement (GEM), to the Cow Project initiated by AIDS widows to improve their financial status, to the hosting of the 2002 International Interdisciplinary Congress on Women, Ugandan women demonstrate their ability to develop and implement solutions to the social issues plaguing their people. Many initiatives focus on the education of young girls, most of whom can ill afford school fees and represent the group most vulnerable to HIV infection. Interviews with these young scholars and their mentors reveal a savvy new generation of women ready to tackle the many challenges in today's Africa.

2003

Uganda

The debt police

Part 29 of a series on how the globalized world economy affects ordinary people. Uganda has recently benefited from a debt relief initiative, but in a country where corruption is rife, is this relief really going to reach the poor? This program travels in rural Uganda with the Uganda Debt Network, an NGO working to ensure that this aid does reach the poor and improves their lives, and reports on the thriving anti-corruption movement that has sprung up, with popular theater and campaigning schoolchildren.

2003

Zambia

Their brothers' keepers : orphaned by AIDS

Looks at two child-headed families living in Chazanga Compound, a shantytown in Lusaka, Zambia. Orphaned by AIDS, they must scramble for necessities and education. Local aid workers and the community try to help, but they also have meager resources. Includes excerpts from a speech given by Stephen Lewis, the UN Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa.

2003

Zimbabwe

Educating Lucia

Part 25 of a series on how the globalized world economy affects ordinary people. Focuses on the story of three African sisters who want to graduate to secondary school but are more likely to receive no formal education, working as seasonal laborers on one of Zimbabwe's large tobacco farms. They're being raised by their grandmother who can only afford school fees for one girl. In African countries such as Zimbabwe, Uganda and Benin the odds are dramatically against girls getting an education.

 
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